Aste1710 syllabus for Fall 2017

Information about Aste1710 syllabus for Fall 2017

Published on August 28, 2017

Author: klhall700

Source: slideshare.net

Content

1. ASTE 1710: Introduction to Agricultural Communication Learning Objectives & Assessment Tools Upon completion of this course, students should be able to: Communicate. Advocate. Educate. IDEA Objectives Course Objectives Gain factual knowledge (terminology, trends) To do this, students will complete quizzes and in- class activities that assess their knowledge of important historical dates and uses for different media to communicate agricultural and environmental topics. • Define agricultural communication • Summarize the history of agricultural communication • Summarize trends in agricultural communication • Describe the role of social media in agriculture • Describe career opportunities in agricultural communication • Identify criteria needed to create a crisis communication plan Develop specific skills, competencies, and points of view needed by professionals in the field most closely related to this course To do this, students will conduct an audience analysis, interview sources, create a podcast, blog, take digital photographs, complete a media relations simulation, develop a crisis communication plan, and learn about business etiquette. • Provide examples and explain the role of crisis communication in agriculture • Create a crisis communication plan • Research and gather information for blog posts using appropriate methods • Interview sources for blog posts • Use Associated Press (AP) style • Write social media posts • Digitally photograph agriculture • Write headline and photo caption for digital images Instructor Dr. Kelsey Hall Office: 107 ASTE 797-3289 or [email protected] Course Fees No course fees are associated with this course. Course Information Class is held in ASTE 108 on Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays from 9:30 a.m. - 10:20 a.m. Course Description This course provides students with an introduction to the field of agricultural communications and journalism by providing an overview of the history, importance to society, and role media plays in agriculture. This course will introduce the communication process, how media serves as a communication channel, and how agricultural communicators utilize media to reach a variety of audiences. Students will specifically investigate historical and contemporary media including magazines, radio, television, movies, public relations, internet, and social media. Availability If my door is open, you are welcome to come in. Even if it’s closed, knock. If I’m available, you can see me. If you need to see me at a specific time, please call or e-mail to make an appointment. Note—I do not read nor reply to e-mail on weekends or weekdays between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. If you are having trouble understanding a concept from this course, please visit with me quickly so that I can help you understand.

2. Course Grading The instructor grades each assignment using a rubric that will be given to the students after the course material for the assignment was explained in lecture. The rubric and comments/edits on your document are returned for each assignment. Your grade will be calculated using the university's standard scale. Grade Percentage Range Grade Percentage Range Grade Percentage Range A 93-100% C+ 77-79% D+ 67-69% A- 90-92% C 73-76% D 60-66% B+ 87-89% C- 70-72% F 59% or below B 83-86% B- 80-82% Syllabus Changes This syllabus is subject to change. I will notify the class regarding all changes. In the event of any discrepancy between this syllabus and content found in Canvas, the information in CANVAS WILL TAKE PRECEDENCE. Late Work As a professional in the agricultural communications field, you will work with many deadlines. It is imperative that you start learning now how to organize yourself to meet such deadlines. Because this is so important, a 20 percent per day deduction will be assessed for all assignments turned in late. Assignments will not be accepted if they are more than 2 days late. Suggested Supplies You will periodically receive readings and handouts, and for that reason I recommend getting a three-ring binder or pocket folder. You may want a USB or media storage (Box, Google Drive) for preparing your course assignments. Course Technology Requirements Canvas is where course content, grades, reading assignments, assignment rubrics, and communication will reside for this course. Here’s how you log in: 1. Go to http://usu.instructure.com 2. Enter your A-Number & password (the same one you use for Banner or Aggiemail) 3. Click “Login” 4. Under courses on the navigation bar, click on Fa17 ASTE-1710-001 5. Click on the navigation bar on the left side of the site to find what you need • Announcements – Messages relevant to the course • Syllabus – Electronic and PDF version of syllabus and schedule • Pages – Each topic can have an overview, readings & videos, lecture materials & more resources posted • Assignments – Assignment descriptions, grading rubrics, & deadlines posted • Grades – Assignment grades For Canvas, Passwords or any other computer-related technical support, contact the IT Service Desk: 435-797-4357 (797-HELP) or 877-878-8325 or http://it.usu.edu or [email protected] Textbook The Communication Scarcity in Agriculture by Jessica Eise & Whitney Hodde Required Readings & Videos Most readings and the videos are available through links in Canvas. Readings not available through Canvas will be provided in class. Socrative We will use a free app that will quickly assess your understanding of concepts during the History Game or on-the- fly questions during lecture. Please download Socrative Student on your mobile phone, tablet or login on your laptop (http://www.socrative.com/).

3. Course Policies Attendance Attending each class meeting is a crucial element for success in the course. We will have group discussions about agricultural communications and journalism, and your views and opinions are welcome and encouraged as long as you remain respectful of your classmates. If you must miss class, you are expected to contact the instructor prior to class. Classroom Behavior Students are expected to be respectful of fellow classmates and the instructor. In order to maintain a classroom environment that is conducive to learning, students are discouraged from using cellular phones, text messaging, or engaging in any other form of distraction. Inappropriate behavior will result in, minimally, a request to leave class. Withdrawal Policy & “I” Grade Policy Students are required to complete all courses for which they are registered by the end of the semester. In some cases, a student may be unable to complete all of the coursework because of extenuating circumstances, but not due to poor performance or to retain financial aid. The term 'extenuating' circumstances includes: 1. Incapacitating illness which prevents a student from attending classes for a minimum period of two weeks, 2. A death in the immediate family, 3. Financial responsibilities requiring a student to alter a work schedule to secure employment, 4. Change in work schedule as required by an employer, 5. Other emergencies deemed appropriate by the instructor. Instructor Communication All communication will be disseminated from Canvas or during class time. I will use Announcements in Canvas to communicate high priority and timely information. You must set your notification preferences in Canvas to receive Announcements and Conversation Messages to ASAP by email, cell phone for text messages, or other social networking services of your choice. Check out these guides on Canvas to help you. 1. How to set up notification preferences in Canvas 2. How to use the Inbox for Conversations in Canvas I will use the Assignments tool in Canvas to communicate deadlines on assignments and rubrics. I will provide timely assignment feedback through comments on your documents and rubrics. Assignments Biography Sheet & Slideshow (15 points) Please tell us a little bit about who you are and why you are taking this class on the biography sheet. You will create a slideshow of yourself to tell us more about yourself with images and words (hobbies, family, favorite music/movies/books, etc.). Share photos that reflect you, but only share what you are comfortable sharing. Post your slideshow in the discussion on Canvas. Academic Advising Activity (10 points) You will make an appointment with your academic advisor or faculty advisor to discuss something you want to know more about, such as 4-year degree plan, study abroad, internships, scholarships, research opportunities, student services, etc. You need to ask questions during the appointment. Your instructor will give a form to complete. Blogging (100 points) The purpose of this assignment is to monitor mainstream and agricultural news sources and blog about current issues that have an impact on or connection to agriculture or natural resources. Over the semester, you must blog for a total of 6 entries. You are welcome to blog more than that, but 6 are the minimum number required. You are also required to comment on at least 5 of your classmates’ entries. You are graded on the quality of your writing, so please be professional in your comments and use good grammar in all entries. Your instructor will explain this further in class. Photo Caption (5 points) During the ethics in agricultural photography lecture, we discussed how to write good photo captions. Go to the last slide in the lecture presentation and write one caption using the information provided. Photo Critique (15 points) Apply what you have learned about agricultural photography by taking photos of plants, crops, animals, or landscapes. Send an e-mail message to [email protected] edu with your photo and caption. We will critique these photos as an in-class activity. Social Media Analysis (50 points) Analyze an organziation's or agricultural journalist's use of social media and/or blog. You will get more details about this assignment and a rubric.

4. Student Feedback/Communication I welcome all feedback on the course. My preferred method of communication with individual students is in person. I will respond to email within 48 hours (Monday – Friday). If you experience a legitimate emergency (according to my standards) that will prevent you from completing required coursework on time, I expect you to communicate with me at the earliest reasonable opportunity. Canvas will track communication between students and teachers providing date and time stamps. Please state the nature of the emergency, and when you expect to turn in the coursework. Over the weekend, expect a slower response time. Your messages must be PROFESSIONALLY composed. That means: • Capitalizing sentences. • Using correct grammar, spelling and punctuation to the best of your ability. • Not using “text short hand.” • Closing the message with your first and last name. • Proofreading the e-mail before you click “send.” How to Succeed in this Course Any successful learning experience requires mutual respect on the part of the student and the instructor. Neither instructor nor student should be subject to others’ behavior that is rude, disruptive, intimidating, or demeaning. The instructor has primary responsibility for and control over classroom behavior and maintenance of academic integrity. Instructor Responsibilities: • Treat all students with courtesy and respect. • Be open to constructive input from students in the course. • Listen and respond to student concerns. • Have passion for the material. • Ensure that opportunities to participate are shared equally by all students in the class. • Provide feedback on assignments. Student Responsibilities: • Come to class on time. • Complete reading assignments BEFORE lectures. • Be prepared for class activities. • When speaking or writing use courteous, respectful language and keep comments and questions relevant to the topic. • Listen to others and appreciate diverse opinions. When someone is talking, you should listen. • Learn from each other's ideas. • Seek help when appropriate. • Check for feedback and grades on Canvas. Crisis Communication Plan Activity (15 points) Develop a portion of a crisis communication plan for a real agricultural organization in Utah. The answers need to relate to the following scenario for groundwater contamination. Career Infographic (50 points) Listen to the presentations from the guest lecturers about their careers in agricultural communication. Use this information and your own research to create an infographic about careers in agricultural communication, needed skills, and/or courses needed to be successful. Business Etiquette Lesson (25 points) You will work with 2 or 3 peers to teach a 10-minute lesson on business etiquette. Topics may include but are not limited to introducing yourself, workplace manners, e-mail etiquette, business attire, meeting etiquette, texting etiquette, cell phone use at work, Facebook use at work, and networking with business cards. Details to come in class. Extra Credit #AgChat Project (10 points) Follow, even participate in, one #AgChat, an online conversation via Twitter, on Tuesdays from 6-8 p.m. Mountain Time (http://twitter.com/agchat). You will provide a reflection of your experience. IDEA Course Evaluation (10 points) If 85% or more of the class completes the IDEA evaluation for ASTE 1710, all students receive 10 points toward their overall grade. The IDEA evaluation is optional, but it greatly helps the instructor know how you evaluate the course on the course objectives. The evaluation must be completed by 5 p.m. on the last day of regular classes (not finals week).

5. Grade Dispute At some point in this course, you may disagree with a grade you receive on an assignment. Here are some guidelines to follow in the case of a grade dispute: • You are encouraged to take sufficient time, a minimum of 24 hours before responding, to think about your grade, review your assignment and respond to me in Canvas inbox. I will only review your grade if you provide me with a written response explaining your perspective and rationale concerning your grade. • You may send this response to me via Canvas inbox. Your argument should be well reasoned and based on evidence. It does not have to be long, but there should be a good rationale for why the grade should be changed. An example of a grade dispute will look something like this: On Question 26, I marked B as the correct answer. According to my notes, this is correct; however, it is marked wrong. My notes (the book, etc…) indicate B is correct because…. Please re-grade this question. Your written argument must be submitted within seven (7) days of the time the work was returned to you or the grade was posted or received. After seven days, no assignment grades will be considered for change. Schedule a meeting with me to further discuss your grade and bring your graded assignment with you to the meeting. University Policies Academic Freedom and Professional Responsibilities Academic freedom is the right to teach, study, discuss, investigate, discover, create, and publish freely. Academic freedom protects the rights of faculty members in teaching and of students in learning. Freedom in research is fundamental to the advancement of truth. Faculty members are entitled to full freedom in teaching, research, and creative activities, subject to the limitations imposed by professional responsibility. Faculty Code Policy #403 further defines academic freedom and professional responsibilities. Academic Integrity - "The Honor System" Each student has the right and duty to pursue his or her academic experience free of dishonesty. The Honor System is designed to establish the higher level of conduct expected and required of all Utah State University students. The Honor Pledge: To enhance the learning environment at Utah State University and to develop student academic integrity, each student agrees to the following Honor Pledge: "I pledge, on my honor, to conduct myself with the foremost level of academic integrity." A student who lives by the Honor Pledge is a student who does more than not cheat, falsify, or plagiarize. A student who lives by the Honor Pledge: • Espouses academic integrity as an underlying and essential principle of the Utah State University community; • Understands that each act of academic dishonesty devalues every degree that is awarded by this institution; and • Is a welcomed and valued member of Utah State University. Emergency Procedures In the case of a drill or real emergency, classes will be notified to evacuate the building by the sound of the fire/emergency alarm system or by a building representative. In the event of a disaster that may interfere with either notification, evacuate as the situation dictates (i.e., in an earthquake when shaking ceases or immediately when a fire is discovered). Turn off computers and take any personal items with you. Elevators should not be used; instead, use the closest stairs. Grievance Process Students who feel they have been unfairly treated may file a grievance through the channels and procedures described in the Student Code
(Article VII. Grievances, pages 25-30).

6. University Policies Diversity Statement Regardless of intent, careless or ill-informed remarks can be offensive and hurtful to others and detract from the learning climate. If you feel uncomfortable in a classroom due to offensive language or actions by an instructor or student(s) regarding ethnicity, gender, or sexual orientation, contact: • Student Services: http://www.usu.edu/studentservices/, 435.797.1712, [email protected], TSC 220 • Student Advocates: https://ususa.usu.edu/resources/student-advocacy/legal-services, 435.797.2912, TSC 326, • Access and Diversity: http://www.usu.edu/accesscenter/, 435.797.1728, [email protected]; TSC 315 • Multicultural Programs: http://www.usu.edu/accesscenter/multiculture/, 435-797-1728, TSC 315 • LGBTQA Programs: http://www.usu.edu/accesscenter/lgbtqa/, 435-797-GAYS, TSC 314 • Provost‘s Office Diversity Resources: https://www.usu.edu/provost/diversity/, (435) 797-8176 You can learn about your student rights by visiting the Code of Policies and Procedures for Students at Utah State University: http://www.usu.edu/studentservices/studentcode/advancement of truth. Faculty members are entitled to full freedom in teaching, research, and creative activities, subject to the limitations imposed by professional responsibility. Faculty Code Policy #403 further defines academic freedom and professional responsibilities. Students with Disabilities USU welcomes students with disabilities. If you have, or suspect you may have, a physical, mental health, or learning disability that may require accommodations in this course, please contact the Disability Resource Center (DRC) as early in the semester as possible (University Inn # 101, 435-797-2444, [email protected]). All disability related accommodations must be approved by the DRC. Once approved, the DRC will coordinate with faculty to provide accommodations. ACADEMIC DISHONESTY The Instructor of this course will take appropriate actions in response to Academic Dishonesty, as defined the University’s Student Code. Acts of academic dishonesty include but are not limited to the following: Cheating: using or attempting to use or providing others with any unauthorized assistance in taking quizzes, tests, examinations, or in any other academic exercise or activity, including working in a group when the instructor has designated that the quiz, test, examination, or any other academic exercise or activity be done “individually”; • Depending on the aid of sources beyond those authorized by the instructor in writing papers, preparing reports, solving problems, or carrying out other assignments; • Substituting for another student, or permitting another student to substitute for oneself, in taking an examination or preparing academic work; • Acquiring tests or other academic material belonging to a faculty member, staff member, or another student without express permission; • Continuing to write after time has been called on a quiz, test, examination, or any other academic exercise or activity; • Submitting substantially the same work for credit in more than one class, except with prior approval of the instructor; or engaging in any form of research fraud. Falsification: altering or fabricating any information or citation in an academic exercise or activity. Plagiarism: knowingly representing, by paraphrase or direct quotation, the published or unpublished work of another person as one's own in any academic exercise or activity without full and clear acknowledgment. It also includes the unacknowledged use of materials prepared by another person or agency engaged in the selling of term papers or other academic materials. The penalties for plagiarism are severe. They include warning or reprimand, grade adjustment, probation, suspension, expulsion, withholding of transcripts, denial or revocation of degrees, and referral to psychological counselling. Sexual Harassment Sexual harassment is defined by the Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Commission as any "unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature." If you feel you are a victim of sexual harassment, you may talk to or file a complaint with the Affirmative Action/Equal Employment Opportunity Office located in Old Main, Room 161, or call the AA/EEO Office at 797-1266. DO YOUR OWN WORK AND GIVE CREDIT TO THOSE FROM WHOM YOU PARAPHRASE OR QUOTE THEIR IDEAS.

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