BPP Period 6

Information about BPP Period 6

Published on January 12, 2008

Author: Bernardo

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Ground Plants:  Ground Plants Along Brushy Creek Slide2:  Many of the ground plants include: whitebrush, agarito, Mexican persimmon, woollybucket bumelia, elbowbush, buffalograss, curly mesquite, Texas grama, sideoats grama, hairy grama, little bluestem, Texas wintergrass, purple three-awn, Indian mallow, firewheel. Types What types of ground plants are there? Location:  Location Where along the creek are plants located? All the types of plants are located along the creek. You will not be able to find all of the types together but spread out along the creek in Round Rock. For maps of the creek look at www.tpwd.com/nature . Agronomics:  Agronomics What economic value do the plants have? The plants along the creek have xeriscape marketablity. The plants are used in low water use landscaping which means drought tolerant. These plants live through the heat and the cold of the Texas seasons and have a homeowner demand in local nurseries. Climate:  Climate What temperature range and rainfall fluctuations? The plants live in the very wet seasons with floods and the very dry, prolonged heat seasons. They live in ice and the 100+ temperatures. For months we can go without rainfall or have rain everyday for a weeks. Adaptations:  Adaptations How do the plants survive? All of the plants have special adaptations but they all have one in common. Waxy leaves. The leaves are the trick to moisture. In the flood the waxy leaves do not absorb too much water to keep from drowning the plant. The leaves also keep water in during the drought when water is scarce. Slide7:  flowering plant (flour-ng plnt) n. A plant that produces flowers and fruit; an angiosperm angiosperm \An"gi*o*sperm\ A plant which has its seeds enclosed in a pericarp The stamen has two parts: anthers and filaments . The anthers carry the pollen. These are generally yellow in color. Anthers are held up by a thread-like part called a filament. Male Female The pistil has three parts: stigma, style, and ovary. The stigma is the sticky surface at the top of the pistil; it traps and holds the pollen. The style is the tube-like structure that holds up the stigma. The style leads down to the ovary that contains the ovules. Flowering Plants Flowering Plants:  Flowering Plants Female Plant Male Plant Flowering Plants:  Flowering Plants The area around Brushy Creek consists of mostly dark gray, loamy clay. It supports many species of grasses. Most of the area of flat to rolling terrain. Brushy creek is located at (29°29' N, 96°54' W). Tamarix ramosissima Tamarisk (salt cedar):  Tamarix ramosissima Tamarisk (salt cedar) Takes all the water from to ground with its widespread root system Makes bad habitat Causes area to become inundated with floods Salt cedar causes increase in sediment Brazos river flow velocity reduced 71% between 1941 and 1979 by ponding effect of dense Tamarix Mesquite Tree:  Mesquite Tree Deep far-spread roots Flower has many stamens, one pistil Most famous species grows to about 40 ft. Produces pod fruit which is highly edible A Mesquite tree’s flower is surrounded by spiky thorns Other plants:  Other plants Cedar Antennaria fallax (picture at bottom left) sorghum Cactus such as prickly pear Wild flowers Weeds and Flowers Links:  Links More info on Mesquite trees More info on plant parts More info on wild flowers Aquatic Plants of Brushy Creek:  Aquatic Plants of Brushy Creek Mistflower Goose grass Smartweed Pale Smartweed Bristly Buttercup Drummond’s Rattlebox Cat-Tails Palafoxia Slide15:  Common Name: Mistflower Conoclinium coelestinum Mist flower Is found along streams, wet meadows, and ditches. It is also around lakes and pools. It is erect standing up to two and a half feet. Found in wet soil growing on creek bank in the shade. Common Name: Smartweed Polygonum hydropiperoides It is a smart weed and water pepper. Found along streams, in swamps, ditches and around ponds and lakes. Found along edge of water in Brushy creek, limestone bedrock channel with shallow soil. Slide16:  Common Name: Palafoxia Palafoxia callosa It is made up of twenty millimeter petals and is a native annual. Found in joints of limestone bedrock along the creek. Common Name: Bristly Buttercup Ranunculus hispidus It is found in rich woods. Found in upper Brushy Creek, just off Great Valley Drive, on marshy ground. Slide17:  Common Name:Pale Smartweed Polygonum lapthifolium Is brown to dark brown, can be up to 2 millimeters long, including the style beak. It is found in wet meadows, marshes, ditches, shores, steam banks, and other places where water stands temped. Found on creek bank in wet soil, Round Rock. Common Name: Goose Grass Galium Aparine Blooming occurs May through June. Found in upper Brushy Creek North in riparian forest. Slide18:  Common Name: Drummond’s Rattlebox Sesbania Drummondii This plant is a free standing shrub that is tolerant of may soils. Found among gravel's on bed of Brushy Creek, one half mile west of Round Rock. Common Name: Cat-Tails Typha Cat-tails; fleshy; stems to 9ft. tall; leaf blades strap-like, round on back, spiraling in top half, sheathed together at base and appear “flathead.” Provide protective cover and nesting areas for birds and animals. Slide19:  Texas Endemics: checklist of all endemic in Williamson county http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/tamuherb.htm Shinners & Mahler's Illustrated Flora of North Central Texas http://artemis.austinc.edu/acad/bio/gdiggs/shinners.html Texas A&M University Bioinformatics Working Group http://www.csdl.tamu.edu/FLORA/imaxxfab.htm The Big Picture Project http://www.cyberwaysandwaterways.com Edible Plants of Brushy Creek:  Edible Plants of Brushy Creek 1.Reed Grass: Phragmites communis Habitat- edges of streams, lakes, ponds, marshes, ditches Edible Parts-Roots, tubers, corms, bulbs, rhizomes prepared as vegetables by boiling/roasting. Boiled/steamed greens, shoots, buds, flowers, or young fruits as a vegetable. Grains, nuts, other seeds, or starchy roots from which flour or meal can be ground. Syrup and sugar made from maple syrup. Grains used for cereal and for cooking whole, such as rice. 2.Chufa: Cyperus esculentus Habitat- ditches, banks of ponds and streams, low wet soil Edible Parts-Roots, tubers, corms, bulbs, rhizomes prepared as vegetables by boiling/roasting. Plant parts eaten as picked along the trail. Grains, nuts, other seeds, or starchy roots from which flour or meal can be ground. Put in fruit juices or originally hot tea or coffee- like beverages that has cooled. Plant parts or substances that may or may not contain their own sugar to produce a confection (candy). Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.) :  Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.) 3.Sweet Flag: Acorus calamus Habitat- ditches, ponds, swamps, lakes, and streams Edible Parts-Leaves large, swordlike Plant parts eaten as picked along the trail. Plant parts or substances that may or may not contain their own sugar to produce a confection (candy). Seasoning made from ground, grated, or cooked whole parts. Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.):  Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.) 4.Great bulrush: Scirpus validus Habitat- edges of ponds, streams, and marshes Small grass-like plant Plant parts eaten as picked along the trail. Edible Parts-Roots, tubers, corms, bulbs, rhizomes prepared as vegetables by boiling/roasting. Boiled/steamed greens, shoots, buds, flowers, or young fruits as a vegetable. Grains, nuts, other seeds, or starchy roots from which flour or meal can be ground. Syrup and sugar made from maple syrup. Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.):  Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.) 5.Yellow pond lily: Nuphar advena Habitat- lakes, ponds, slow streams, tidal waters Aquatic plant Edible Parts-Roots, tubers, corms, bulbs, rhizomes prepared as vegetables by boiling/roasting. Grains, nuts, other seeds, or starchy roots from which flour or meal can be ground. Grains used for cereal and for cooking whole, such as rice. Nuts, nut-lets, large seeds used whole and for oil extract. Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.):  Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.) 6.Cattail: Typha latifolia Habitat- ditches, margins of ponds and lakes Large semi-aquatic plant Plant parts eaten as picked along the trail. Edible Parts-Roots, tubers, corms, bulbs, rhizomes prepared as vegetables by boiling/roasting. Boiled/steamed greens, shoots, buds, flowers, or young fruits as a vegetable. Grains, nuts, other seeds, or starchy roots from which flour or meal can be ground. Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.):  Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.) 7.Watercress: Nasturtium officinale Habitat- springs and cool clear streams Flower white Edible Parts-Seasoning made from ground, grated, or cooked whole parts. Used raw in toss salad. Boiled/steamed greens, shoots, buds, flowers, or young fruits as a vegetable. 8.Hard-stem bulrush: cirpus acutus Habitat- edges of ponds, lakes, streams, and marshes Small grass-like plant Large semi-aquatic plant Plant parts eaten as picked along the trail. Edible Parts-Roots, tubers, corms, bulbs, rhizomes prepared as vegetables by boiling/roasting. Boiled/steamed greens, shoots, buds, flowers, or young fruits as a vegetable. Grains, nuts, other seeds, or starchy roots from which flour or meal can be ground. Syrup and sugar made from maple syrup. Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.):  Edible Plants of Brushy Creek (cont.) 9.Cleavers: Galium boreale Habitat- rich woodlands, fields, edges of streams and lakes Flowers white Prepared in coffee and tea. Used raw in toss salad. Edible Parts-Boiled/steamed greens, shoots, buds, flowers, or young fruits as a vegetables. 10.Arrowhead: Sagittaria latifolia Habitat- edges of lakes, ponds, streams ditches Semi-aquatic, flowers white Edible Parts-Roots, tubers, corms, bulbs, rhizomes prepared as vegetables by boiling/roasting. Used raw in toss salad. Red mulberry Sweet flag:  Red mulberry Sweet flag 11.Ground cherry: Physalis pubescens Habitat- old fields, open woodlands, moist sites Plant parts eaten as picked along the trail. Edible Parts-Jams, jellies, and sauces made from fruit. Fruits eaten uncooked, though perhaps with toppings. True fruit or non fruit parts used in pies, baked goods, and other dessert recipes. Poisonous: severe reaction results from eating wrong part or eating at wrong stage. Fungi:  Fungi The Kingdom Fungi includes some of the most important organisms, both in terms of their ecological and economic roles. By breaking down dead organic material, they continue the cycle of nutrients through the environment. Algae:  Algae The "green algae" is the most diverse group of algae, with more than 7000 species growing in a variety of habitats, those areas include Brushy Creek. Like the plants, the green algae contain two forms of chlorophyll, which they use to capture light energy to fuel the manufacture of sugars, but unlike plants they are primarily aquatic. Lichens:  Lichens Lichens- A type of fungi that is very large in numbers near the Brushy Creek. Lichens are in the Mushroom Group of Fungi. Today there around 15,000 kinds of Lichens. Types of Lichens:  Types of Lichens There are three main types of lichens. They are all found on certain types of trees on certain areas of the trees. The types are Foliose Lichens (leafy) Crustose Lichens (crusty) Fruticose lichens (stalked, shrubby, or hair-like) Mushrooms:  Mushrooms Mushrooms are certainly the most common of the Fungi. It is found throughout the Brushy Creek area, being around the streams and near the trees absorbing the energy of the dead plants Different types of Mushrooms:  Different types of Mushrooms 1. Collybia bakerensis - a species of wood decaying mushroom restricted to western North America. 2. Kuehneromyces lignicola - a common species of mushroom on decaying conifer wood, usually found early in the season. 3. Chromosera cyanophylla - a highly characteristic mushroom on decaying conifer wood. 4. Tricholoma magnivelare - this mycorrhizal forest agaric is commercially harvested and shipped fresh to Japan. Links:  Links http://daphne.palomar.edu/wayne/ww0504.htm http://www.herb.lsa.umich.edu/kidpage/Kingfact.htm http://www.ucmp.berkeley.edu/fungi/fungisy.html The Trees at Brushy Creek :  The Trees at Brushy Creek Kim Francisco Dakotah Smith Jason Webb Trees At Brushy Creek:  Trees At Brushy Creek American Sycamore Eastern Redbud Chinaberry Eastern Red Cedar Live Oak Hackberry trees identified from the American Tree Identification Guide American Sycamore:  American Sycamore Platanus occidentalis can be 100 ft. tall wide-spreading crown mottled brown, white, and gray bark seeds are ball-like and dangle on stalks can live 500-600 years Eastern Redbud:  Eastern Redbud Cercis canadensis 10-30 ft. tall grows along streams scaly, reddish-brown bark lavender flowers with pinkish pods generally used as ornaments in Texas Chinaberry:  Chinaberry Melia azedarach adaptable in a variety of situations yellow, fleshy fruit eaten by birds “trash tree-” messy habits, prone to insects and diseases deciduous leaves Eastern Red Cedar:  Eastern Red Cedar Juniperus virginiana 20-50 ft. tall blunt, scaly, evergreen leaves growing close to twig found on poor, rocky soils seeds eaten by cedar waxwings, who spread them Live Oak:  Live Oak Quercus virginiana 40-50 ft. tall 3-4 ft. in diameter huge, wide-spreading crown grows small, edible acorns elliptical evergreen leaves Hackberry:  Hackberry Celtis occidentalis purple berries warty, gray-brown bark most identifiable feature 30-40 ft tall small, green flowers appear in April and May Links:  Links Http://users.ids.net/~ritrees/Nov99.htm http://www.gpnc.org/eastern.htm http://www.hcs.ohio-state.edu/ODN2/Education/ohiotrees/hackberry.com Poisonous Plants of Brushy Creek:  Poisonous Plants of Brushy Creek Wild Mushrooms:  Wild Mushrooms Not all mushrooms are poisonous but the Panther Cap Mushrooms Amanita spp. Death Cap Mushrooms Amanita spp. And the Horse Mushroom are. And if eaten they will cause vomiting, nausea or, if the dosage is high enough even death. These plants are native to Brushy Creek. Common Oak:  Common Oak The common oak (seen right) has very weak toxins and will only cause nausea but its cousins the Quercus alba, White Oak, Quercus rubra, Red Oak, and Quercus velutina, Black Oak are a bit more potent. To find more on poisonous plants click http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/comlist.html Marijuana Cannabis sativa :  Marijuana Cannabis sativa This plant is not native but years of smuggling and home growing has left these plants wild. Found in brushy areas if any part of the plant is eaten then some sort of high will become induced. Victims will experience mood shifts and possibly hallucinations if the dosage is high enough. Poison ivy Toxicodendron radicans :  Poison ivy Toxicodendron radicans As many of us know poison ivy is native and will cause a rash 24 hours after contact. To prevent rash wash within the hour. Leaves of three let it be Leaves of four eat some more Leaves of seven will take you to heaven Poison oak Toxicodendron diversiloba :  Poison oak Toxicodendron diversiloba Poison oak is similar to the poison ivy and other members of the Toxicodendron genus but it is less harmful if contacted and on the verge of edible. These plants are native but are found more in the hill country than the Brushy Creek Area. Poison Sumac Toxicodendron vernix :  Poison Sumac Toxicodendron vernix Poison Sumac causes the worst rash of all the Toxicodendron genus this plants rash will retain the longest and will spread more rapidly throughout the body. Wash after contact and drink plenty of fluids to help wash the toxins out of the body. Bibliography:  Bibliography http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/comlist.html Texas’ Poisonous Plants, software. And field research by Travis Cole and Jameson R. Photos Provided by Yahoo! Photo Archive

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