cardio cerebral resuscitation

Information about cardio cerebral resuscitation

Published on August 2, 2014

Author: toufiqurrahman52

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Cardio-cerebral resuscitation: Cardio-cerebral resuscitation Dr. Md.Toufiqur Rahman MBBS, FCPS , MD, FACC , FESC, FRCPE , FSCAI, FAPSC, FAPSIC , FAHA, FCCP, FRCPG Associate Professor of Cardiology National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Sher -e- Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207 Consultant, Medinova , Malibagh branch Honorary Consultant, Apollo Hospitals, Dhaka and STS Life Care Centre, Dhanmondi [email protected] CRT 2014 Washington DC , USA PowerPoint Presentation: Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of mortality in the United States, Canada,  and  Europe.   Unfortunately, the  firs t sign  of cardiovascular disease is often the  last, as the first sign is  often sudden death.  In the United States alone,  thereare  about 275,000 sudden deaths  per year from  out­of­hospital  cardiac arrests (OHCAs).   Despite national  guidelinesand  their near  semi­decennial  update,  the reported survival  rates for OHCA between 1978 and 2008  remained unchanged at 7.6%.  Obviously, OHCA is a major public health problem that has not  previously been adequately addressed. Patients with OHCA are not a homogeneous group.  Therefore, just looking at the overall survival of patients with  OHCAmight  not be the best indicator of the effectiveness of therapy.   Introduction PowerPoint Presentation: In­hospital  cardiac arrests are most often secondary to  hypotension  and shock, which is the end result of  physiologi c deterioration   from  underlying medical conditions such as infections, renal failure,  anemia, toxins, electrolyte  imbalances,hypoxia , drugs, and trauma.  In these cases, the best approach is prevention, by treating the  underlying disease to prevent the cardiac arrest. " cardiocerebral  resuscitation"  approachhas  resulted in a significant improvement in the survival of patients with OHCA.  Classic cardiopulmonary resuscitation(CPR) should be reserved for secondary cardiac arrest, secondary to respiratory insufficiency  from conditions such  as,drowning , drug overdose, or advanced  pulmonary disease . Introduction PowerPoint Presentation: The modern era of CPR began in 1960 at Johns Hopkins Hospital when  Kouwenhoven   (a retired engineer), Jude ( asurgical  resident), and  Knickerbocker  (an engineer)  reported successful resuscitation of patients with cardiac  arrest,without  performing a   thoracotomy .   This approach was based on their experimental animal studies .  There were  norandomized  clinical trials assessing this technique or comparing it to  other approaches. In the beginning, these pioneers taught that assisted ventilations were not necessary  during resuscitation efforts as  theanimal  gasped .  However, others thought that assisted ventilation was necessary, so  mouth­to­mouth  "rescue  breathing"interposed  between closed chest compressions became cardiopulmonary resuscitation, known as CPR.   Over the next50 years, using CPR meant performing chest compressions and assisted ventilations . It then became evident that most unexpected sudden deaths were not occurring in hospitals.  Historical Perspective PowerPoint Presentation:  During the 1970s,researchers from Belfast, NY, and Seattle launched  programs in which medical care was delivered in the field by  traine d medics   who rode the ambulance services and were able to defibrillate patients in  the community who were in cardiac arrest.  This was a conceptual change in the way medical care for patients with  OHCA was deliveredÍž initial  emergenc y care  was delivered by  nonphysicians   (i.e., paramedics) in the community under  physician­guided  protocols. Soon thereafter, researchers again changed the paradigm by initiating care  for patients with cardiac arrest b y laypersons.  Again, these major advances in treating patients with OHCA were not  subjected to randomized  clinicaltrials .   The ABCs (airway, breathing, compressions) of CPR became the standard of  care for patients with cardiac arrest. Over approximately the past decade, the use of automated external  defibrillators has gained increasing importance. Historical Perspective PowerPoint Presentation: There are two general types of cardiac arrest.  A primary cardiac arrest is an unexpected witnessed (seen or heard)  collapse in a person who is not responsive. Gasping occurs in the majority (55%) of patients with OHCA, and is often interpreted as  breathing.  During primary cardiac arrest, the heart suddenly stops pumping blood  andthe  arterial blood is oxygenated at the time of the arrest. Secondary cardiac arrest is secondary to severe hypoxia, often from  drowning,  respiratory failure, drug overdose, or hypotension due to shock or hemorrhage . In patients with cardiac arrest, each chest compression is the patient's  heart beat.  If chest compressions  areinterrupted  for any reason, blood flow to the  heart and brain essentially stops,  decreasing the chance for neurologically intact survival. PowerPoint Presentation: The previous fixation on ventilations interrupted essential blood flow to the body, and  in the excitement  ofresuscitation  efforts, hyperventilation was  common. A new approach for patients with primary cardiac arrest, called  cardiocerebral  resuscitation, has been shown  tosignificantly  increase survival. Studies in Arizona have shown that the survival rate of patients with OHCA is  significantly increased when CO­CPR is advocated and taught to the public. For primary cardiac arrest,  cardiocerebral  resuscitation prohibits early  intubation, advocates passive  ventilation,emphasizes  minimal interruptions of chest compressions, and encourages early administration of epinephrine. For patients with ROSC but in a coma following cardiac arrest, new approaches include therapeutic  hypothermia,consideration  of early cardiac catheterization for those with  possible acute coronary occlusion as the etiology  oftheir  arrest, delay in terminating  care, and appropriate intensive care. PowerPoint Presentation: Resuscitation science is a dynamic field.   Resuscitation of patients in cardiac arrest is dependent on  a carefully  followed system of care and is no stronger than its  weakest link .  Cardiac arrest is a public health problem.  A s such , solutions depend upon accurate data measuring the  effectiveness of the system of care.   Resuscitation  science ,b oth  in the laboratory and in  clinical arenas, provides guides to  developing the best models of care to fit  each community. Conclusion Thank You: Thank You [email protected] Asia Pacific Congress of Hypertension , 2014, February Cebu city, Phillipines Seminar on Management of Hypertension , Gulshan, Dhaka

Related presentations


Other presentations created by toufiqurrahman52

echo reporting basics
22. 07. 2014
0 views

echo reporting basics

Cardiovascular system assessment
01. 08. 2014
0 views

Cardiovascular system assessment

Management of Hypertension
11. 08. 2014
0 views

Management of Hypertension

echo evaluation 4
18. 08. 2014
0 views

echo evaluation 4

Echocardiography evaluation  3
18. 08. 2014
0 views

Echocardiography evaluation 3