Conservation_The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation

Information about Conservation_The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation

Published on July 15, 2014

Author: csimkovich

Source: authorstream.com

Content

The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation: Target 8 and Beyond: The Global Strategy for Plant Conservation: Target 8 and Beyond N. Cavender, the Vice President of Science and Conservation, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, Illinois J. Cruse-Sanders, Science and Conservation Department, Atlanta Botanical Garden, Atlanta, Georgia D. A. Galbraith, Head of Science, Biodiversity Programs Division, Royal Botanical Gardens, Burlington, Ontario A. Hird, Botanic Gardens Conservation International U.S., Rancho Santa Anna Botanical Garden, Claremont, California M. Westwood, Tree Conservation Specialist, The Morton Arboretum, Lisle, Illinois Wednesday, 25 June 2014 1:30 PM APGA 2014 Denver, Colorado Today’s Session: Today’s Session An introduction to the GSPC Elevate awareness, discuss approaches by gardens/how gardens can benefit from considering it We want to: Demonstrate how the GSPC can be used as a foundation for relevance and mission of public gardens Session Format: GSPC background and development Overview of GSPC Objectives  and Targets A high level description. We really want audience engagement! Discussion, be interactive! Have you new ideas/examples/case studies? D How can the GSPC be used as a foundation for relevance and mission of public gardens?: How can the GSPC be used as a foundation for relevance and mission of public gardens ? How is what we do relevant on the global stage? How can we use the products of GSPC-related efforts to promote our own missions? D What is the GSPC?: What is the GSPC? A grass-roots program for slowing extinction of plant diversity and related societal and economic benefits Part of the UNEP Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) Voluntary, cooperative approach to 16 measurable targets with 2020 target date Adopted by CBD 2002 (for 2010) Revised by CBD 2010 (for 2020) D The GSPC: What it is and isn’t: The GSPC: What it is and isn’t The GSPC is: Voluntary World-Wide Flexible Inclusive & welcoming of all contributions to plant conservation A gap-filling tool Specific in targets and goals Helpful in reporting and providing context The GSPC isn’t: A funding source A set of regulations Perfect The only set of recommendations conservation guidance D International Agenda for Botanic Gardens in Conservation: International Agenda for Botanic Gardens in Conservation More than 200 recommendations for gardens and networks for conservation, biodiversity and education More than 400 institutions have formally endorsed Recognized by CBD as Botanical Garden’s Contribution to the GSPC Revised in 2011 North American Botanic Garden Strategy for Plant Conservation: North American Botanic Garden Strategy for Plant Conservation Initial draft 2004; revised and published in 2007; English, French, Spanish all published A regional summary of botanical gardens’ contributions to plant conservation issues Includes targets important for North America based on global botanic gardens targets developed in 2004 Supports international programs like the Global Strategy for Plant Conservation and International Agenda for Botanic Gardens in Conservation How Others Might See Gardens Contributing to the GSPC: How Others Might See Gardens Contributing to the GSPC North American Botanic Gardens Conservation Strategy (2007) International Agenda for Botanic Gardens in Conservation (2011) Convention on Biological Diversity A Cross-cutting Program A Voluntary Sectoral Action Plan A Voluntary Regional Action Plan GSPC (targets to 2020) Garden Garden Garden D How We Can Use the GSPC: Reinforcing our Relevance: How We Can Use the GSPC: Reinforcing our Relevance Regional Relevance North American Botanic Gardens Conservation Strategy (2007) Sectoral Relevance International Agenda for Botanic Gardens in Conservation (2011) International Relevance Convention on Biological Diversity Global Relevance for Plants GSPC (targets to 2020) Nationa l Relevance National Action Plans, if available Your Own Gardens’ Preferences D Sophie Williams (2010) How influential is the GSPC on Botanical Gardens?: Sophie Williams (2010) How influential is the GSPC on Botanical Gardens? Sophie Williams (2010): The number of botanic gardens implementing the GSPC targets in different regions of the world: Sophie Williams (2010): The number of botanic gardens implementing the GSPC targets in different regions of the world The on-line GSPC Tool Kit: http://www.plants2020.net/: D The on-line GSPC Tool Kit: http ://www.plants2020.net/ Five Overall Objectives: Five Overall Objectives Objective I: Plant diversity is well understood, documented and recognized Objective II: Plant diversity is urgently and effectively conserved Objective III: Plant diversity is used in a sustainable and equitable manner Objective IV: Education and awareness about plant diversity, its role in sustainable livelihoods Objective V: The capacities and public engagement necessary to implement the Strategy have been developed D GSPC Reporting and Measurement: GSPC Reporting and Measurement Progress toward achievement of the GSPC Targets GSPC Mid-term Review, 2011-2014 A PowerPoint Presentation: A PowerPoint Presentation: Progress towards achievement of the GSPC Targets GSPC Mid-term Review 2011-2014 A Botanic Gardens and Biodiversity Hotspots: Botanic Gardens and Biodiversity Hotspots A PowerPoint Presentation: A PowerPoint Presentation: A How can we use GardenSearch?: How can we use GardenSearch? Global directory of botanical facilities and expertise: # with seed bank: 279 (56 in the U.S.) # with herbarium: 370 (65 in the U.S.) # with computerised plant record system: 542 (175 in the U.S.) # with a conservation program: 375 (103 in the U.S.) # involved in reintroduction: 204 (47 in the U.S.) # that interpret threatened plants in collections: 134 (36 in the U.S.) # that offer public education courses: 335 (129 in the U.S.) GardenSearch can help us measure global progress toward relevant GSPC targets A PowerPoint Presentation: Location of botanic gardens with seed banks A PowerPoint Presentation: A How can we use PlantSearch?: How can we use PlantSearch ? Global status of plants in cultivation and which ones are threatened – monitoring GSPC Target 8 Overview of ex situ collections by country / region Ex situ surveys by taxon (e.g. Magnolias, Oaks) 2014 241 US collections 39% native taxa in US collections 41% in 1 collection 2010 230 NA collections 39% native taxa in NA collections 37% native taxa in US collections 42% in 1 collection A PowerPoint Presentation: 1 Herbaria, Botanic gardens , Bioinformatics specialists, GBIF Focal Point, University taxonomy depts , National Flora Societies 2 Herbaria, Botanic gardens , Conservation specialists, Universities, Research Institutes, National Red List Authority, IUCN SGs 3 Universities, Research institutes, Botanic gardens , Indigenous and local communities 4 Protected area managers, Ecologists, Community Based Organizations(CBOs ) 5 Protected area managers, Universities, Research Inst , Botanic gardens , Indigenous communities, Environmental NGOs, CBOs 6 Farmers and land owners, Agri-business sector, Forest managers, Logging companies, CBOs, Women’s associations 7 Protected area managers, Botanic gardens , National flora societies, Universities 8 Botanic gardens , Seed banks, Universities, Research institutes, CBOs 9 Plant genetic resource institutes, Seed banks, Agricultural research institutes, Plant breeders, Universities, indigenous and local communities, Women’s Associations, Traditional healers, Farmers ’ associations 10 Protected area managers, Quarantine agencies, Horticultural trade, Research institutes, Universities 11 National CITES authority, Customs officials, medicinal plant traders, plant product importers/exporters, horticulture trade. 12 I ndigenous communities, plant product traders, medicinal/horticultural trade, Women’s associations, Traditional healers 13 Indigenous communities, Universities, Women’s associations 14 Botanic gardens , Teachers, Environmental NGOs, Communication specialists, Universities, Media groups, CBOs 15 Universities, Schools, Research Institutes 16 All stakeholders GSPC Targets and Botanic Gardens OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS: Breakout Discussions: OBJECTIVES AND TARGETS: Breakout Discussions N Objective I: Plant diversity is well understood, documented and recognized : Objective I: Plant diversity is well understood, documented and recognized Target 1: An online flora of all known plants Target 2: An assessment of the conservation status of all known plant species, as far as possible, to guide conservation action Target 3: Information, research and associated outputs, and methods necessary to implement the Strategy developed and shared N PowerPoint Presentation: Does your institution contribute to Objective 1? How does Objective 1 help your organization fulfil its mission? Does your institution: Collect native plants for your living collection? Employ taxonomy, conservation and/or research staff? Publish or present on taxonomy, conservation and/or research? Specialize in a particular taxonomic group or maintain a special collection? Have a staff or board conservation/research committee or external advisory committee? Provide web content about plant diversity ? D Example Contributions to Objective I: Example Contributions to Objective I Curate and make available collections to support identification and monitoring Support floras and other publications and online references Monitor locally threatened species and invasive species Research impacts of climate change, land use, invasive species, pollution and other priority threats on plant diversity Build collaborative research and publish results Offer a citizen science program to support conservation Integrate research program with the broader institution A Objective II: Plant diversity is urgently and effectively conserved: Objective II: Plant diversity is urgently and effectively conserved Target 4: At least 15 per cent of each ecological region or vegetation type secured through effective management and/or restoration Target 5: At least 75 per cent of the most important areas for plant diversity of each ecological region protected with effective management in place for conserving plants and their genetic diversity Target 6: At least 75 per cent of production lands in each sector managed sustainably, consistent with the conservation of plant diversity Target 7: At least 75 per cent of known threatened plant species conserved in situ . D Objective II: Plant diversity is urgently and effectively conserved (continued): Objective II: Plant diversity is urgently and effectively conserved (continued) Target 8: At least 75 per cent of threatened plant species in ex situ collections, preferably in the country of origin, and at least 20 per cent available for recovery and restoration programmes Target 9: 70 per cent of the genetic diversity of crops including their wild relatives and other socio-economically valuable plant species conserved, while respecting, preserving and maintaining associated indigenous and local knowledge Target 10: Effective management plans in place to prevent new biological invasions and to manage important areas for plant diversity that are invaded D Pop Quiz! Does your institution…: Pop Quiz! Does your institution… Employ plant records and horticulture staff ? Participate in any ecosystem restoration or sustainable management initiatives? Participate in any in situ conservation initiatives? Publish/maintain a living collections inventory? Have a living collections policy that includes threatened and invasive species ?   Prioritize genetically diverse wild collections ? Conduct any genetic analysis on threatened species in your collection and/or in the wild? D Contributions to Objective II: Contributions to Objective II Develop a relationship with your state’s Natural Heritage Botanist(s) Maintain natural areas and manage invasive species Use horticulture skills and facilities to research and share information on the culture/biology of threatened species Offer volunteer opportunities in conservation research Include threatened and invasive species in collections policy Upload taxa lists to BGCI’s PlantSearch database on an annual basis Report expertise and facilities to BGCI’s GardenSearch database on a regular basis A PowerPoint Presentation: Track conservation status in plant records and assess the conservation value of collections Record use and distribution of collection materials Monitor collections for known and potential invasive species Research impacts of invasive species on biodiversity Verify, build, backup and carefully manage genetic diversity within collections Record population/habitat data for wild-origin accessions Support regional/national/global conservation strategies/priorities Advocate to policy makers on importance of plant diversity and conservation Develop ex situ conservation and in situ reintroduction programs D PowerPoint Presentation: Develop field genebanks for species that cannot be seed banked Buy/sell only sustainably-grown and -harvested plant products Partner with and support sustainable land use and biodiversity assessment efforts Partner with existing conservation initiatives A Target 7: At least 75 per cent of known threatened plant species conserved in situ. : High Impact Target 7: At least 75 per cent of known threatened plant species conserved in situ . J Target 7 example: Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance – Conservation through PARTNERSHIP: Target 7 example: Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance – Conservation through PARTNERSHIP Benchmark recommendations: Track in situ conservation and restoration How large an area and where? Number of species that are monitored? Number of species that are restored? Areas acquired for conservation? Tracking impacts of climate change? Addressing invasive species impacts? Number of partners for in situ conservation? Objective III: Plant diversity is used in a sustainable and equitable manner : Objective III: Plant diversity is used in a sustainable and equitable manner Target 11: No species of wild flora endangered by international trade Target 12: All wild harvested plant-based products sourced sustainably Target 13: Indigenous and local knowledge innovations and practices associated with plant resources maintained or increased, as appropriate, to support customary use, sustainable livelihoods, local food security and health care D Target 11: No species of wild flora endangered by international trade: Lower Impact Because CITES has primary responsibility for the issue, but we are Still important links in education and awareness Target 11: No species of wild flora endangered by international trade D Target 11 example: CITES rescue centers: Target 11 example: CITES rescue centers EG: US Botanic Garden Plant Rescue Center Program (from their web site): The Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Flora and Fauna (CITES) is an agreement among most countries of the world to document and regulate international trade in specimens of wild animals and plants to ensure that uncontrolled trade does not threaten their survival. Occasionally , plants transported across international boundaries without required CITES permits are confiscated by border authorities. If plants cannot be sent back to their country of origin, they are placed into a Plant Rescue Center, which agrees to maintain and care for them in perpetuity. 62 botanical gardens, arboretums, zoos and research institutions participate in the US Plant Rescue Center Program. The Plant Rescue Program was established in 1978 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the agency in charge of implementing the requirements of CITES in the United States. Hundreds of protected and threatened plants, mostly orchids and succulents, have been accepted into the USBG collections through the Plant Rescue Center Program and used for conservation and education programs D Target 13: Indigenous and local knowledge innovations and practices associated with plant resources maintained or increased, as appropriate, to support customary use, sustainable livelihoods, local food security and health care: High Impact Conservaton of Biocultural Diversity is a key goal for botanical gardens Target 13: Indigenous and local knowledge innovations and practices associated with plant resources maintained or increased, as appropriate, to support customary use, sustainable livelihoods, local food security and health care A Target 13 example: Sacred Seeds program at Missouri Botanical Garden: Target 13 example: Sacred Seeds program at Missouri Botanical Garden http://sacredseedssanctuary.org A Pop Quiz: Does your institution…: Pop Quiz: Does your institution… Offer classes, tours, and lectures on plant diversity and conservation? Provide conservation and sustainability messages on interpretative signs or special displays? Provide information on how the public can participate in conservation initiatives (native plants in home landscaping, volunteer opportunities, “adopt a plant” donations)? D Contributions to Objective III: Contributions to Objective III Support sustainable harvest certification programs Serve as a CITES rescue center Track CITES status via plant records Develop a repatriation program for exotic species Develop/offer an ethnobotany program Partner with local Native American tribes and other cultural groups to study and promote traditional uses of plants Grow, display and interpret traditionally important species Develop and share propagation protocols to reduce collecting pressure on highly desirable species D Objective IV: Education and awareness about plant diversity, its role in sustainable livelihoods and importance to all life on earth is promoted : Objective IV: Education and awareness about plant diversity, its role in sustainable livelihoods and importance to all life on earth is promoted Target 14: The importance of plant diversity and the need for its conservation incorporated into communication, education and public awareness programmes. JN Target 14 example: Science Café: Target 14 example: Science Café Atlanta Botanical Garden, PLANTS and HUMAN HEALTH Benchmarks: School groups Interns Visitors Continuing Ed. Special events Volunteers University/Grad. Community groups # Staff # Programs # Engaged Contributions to Objective IV: Contributions to Objective IV Offer conservation- and biodiversity-focused classes, lectures, tours and information Employ qualified education staff Evaluate conservation-based education effectiveness and integrate with ongoing conservation and research efforts Develop an environmental education strategy Build programs appropriate for local cultures and environmental issues Promote and support environmental education in schools Establish strong marketing programs to effectively communicate and raise awareness of the value of plants D Objective V: The capacities and public engagement necessary to implement the Strategy have been developed : Objective V: The capacities and public engagement necessary to implement the Strategy have been developed Target 15: The number of trained people working with appropriate facilities sufficient according to national needs, to achieve the targets of this Strategy Target 16: Institutions, networks and partnerships for plant conservation established or strengthened at national, regional and international levels to achieve the targets of this Strategy M Target 15 example: IUCN Red List Training: Target 15 example: IUCN Red List Training Most comprehensive, objective, global process for evaluating the extinction risk of species Scientific basis for CBD threat indicators Foundation for governments to enact conservation policies Target 15 example: IUCN Red List Training: Target 15 example: IUCN Red List Training Most comprehensive, objective, global process for evaluating the extinction risk of species Scientific basis for CBD threat indicators Foundation for governments to enact conservation policies CRITICAL GAP: Lack of fundamental biological/distribution data Bottleneck in gathering/uploading data 2013  Only 6% (18,291) of plant species assessed! Target 15 example: IUCN Red List Training: Target 15 example: IUCN Red List Training Target 16: Institutions, networks and partnerships for plant conservation established or strengthened at national, regional and international levels to achieve the targets of this Strategy : High Impact Target 16: Institutions, networks and partnerships for plant conservation established or strengthened at national, regional and international levels to achieve the targets of this Strategy D Target 16 examples: Networks: Target 16 examples: Networks Global Networks: BGCI GPPC Global Trees Campaign ArbNet Regional Networks: APGA, NAPCC National Networks: CPC: Network of botanical gardens across USA CBCN: network of museums, zoos, botanical gardens, arboreta across Canada – becoming a GSPC-focused network Local Networks: Georgia Plant Conservation Alliance Denver RPCI Chicago Wilderness D Pop Quiz: Does your institution…: Pop Quiz: Does your institution… Support undergraduate or graduate conservation training? Offer staff/volunteer training on conservation issues and techniques? Partner with networks that support conservation collections such as the NAPCC? Collaborate with researchers outside of the public garden community (academia, government research facilities, private institutes)? D Concluding Remarks, and Results of Audience Survey: Concluding Remarks, and Results of Audience Survey D Have We: Demonstrated how the GSPC can be used as a foundation for relevance and mission of public gardens?: Have We: Demonstrated how the GSPC can be used as a foundation for relevance and mission of public gardens ? D BACKUP MATERIAL: BACKUP MATERIAL D Not Going It Alone: Global Partnership for Plant Conservation: Not Going It Alone: Global Partnership for Plant Conservation Loose voluntary association of organizations supportive of GSPC Recognized by CBD Secretariat as part of flexible coordinating mechanism for GSPC http://www.plants2020.org Secretariat provided by BGCI All contributing to GSPC targets in own ways National Action Plans: e.g., Canada: National Action Plans: e.g., Canada Biodiversity Action Plan for Botanical Gardens and Arboreta in Canada (2001) “2010 Challenge” published in 2006 as update to 2001 action plan, reporting on progress and integrating GSPC targets as well as North American Botanic Garden Strategy for Plant Conservation Target 1: An online flora of all known plants: High Impact Target 1 : An online flora of all known plants A Target 1 example: World Flora Online: Target 1 example: World Flora Online A Target 2: An assessment of the conservation status of all known plant species, as far as possible, to guide conservation action: High Impact Target 2: An assessment of the conservation status of all known plant species, as far as possible, to guide conservation action M Target 3: Information, research and associated outputs, and methods necessary to implement the Strategy developed and shared: High Impact Target 3: Information , research and associated outputs, and methods necessary to implement the Strategy developed and shared N Target 3 example: The Morton Arboretum’s Center for Tree Science: Target 3 example: The Morton Arboretum’s Center for Tree Science N Target 4: At least 15 per cent of each ecological region or vegetation type secured through effective management and/or restoration: High Impact Target 4 : At least 15 per cent of each ecological region or vegetation type secured through effective management and/or restoration D Target 4 example: Ecological Restoration Alliance: Target 4 example: Ecological Restoration Alliance www.erabg.org D Target 8: At least 75 per cent of threatened plant species in ex situ collections, preferably in the country of origin, and at least 20 per cent available for recovery and restoration programmes: High Impact Target 8: At least 75 per cent of threatened plant species in ex situ collections, preferably in the country of origin, and at least 20 per cent available for recovery and restoration programmes M Target 8 example: Palm and cycad collections at Montgomery Botanical Center: Target 8 example: Palm and cycad collections at Montgomery Botanical Center M Target 10: Effective management plans in place to prevent new biological invasions and to manage important areas for plant diversity that are invaded : High Impact Target 10: Effective management plans in place to prevent new biological invasions and to manage important areas for plant diversity that are invaded A Target 10 example: Sentinel Plant Network: Target 10 example: Sentinel Plant Network SPN is a collaboration between the American Public Gardens Association (APGA) and the National Plant Diagnostic Network (NPDN) and is funded through the USDA’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS ). More than 165 member gardens in the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Daniel Stern, Sentinel Plant Network Manager [email protected] A Pop Quiz! Does your institution…: Pop Quiz! Does your institution… Track CITES status via plant records? Buy and sell sustainably-grown and –harvested plant products? Provide (multi-lingual) ethnobotanical information about traditional uses of plants ? D PowerPoint Presentation: N PowerPoint Presentation: N PowerPoint Presentation: N What is the State of the World’s Plants?: What is the State of the World’s Plants? 2009 global review of progress on the conservation and sustainable use of the world’s plants ~370,000 species of wild plants & hundreds of thousands of cultivars, varieties, hybrids About 25% are at risk of extinction Public Gardens Mission Statements: A sampler: Public Gardens Mission Statements: A sampler Toronto Botanical Garden connects people, plants and the natural world through education, inspiration and leadership. Mission of the Missouri Botanical Garden : To discover and share knowledge about plants and their environment in order to preserve and enrich life The mission of the National Tropical Botanical Garden is to enrich life through discovery, scientific research, conservation, and education by perpetuating the survival of plants, ecosystems, and cultural knowledge of tropical regions. D PowerPoint Presentation: Mission: The New York Botanical Garden is an advocate for the plant kingdom. The Garden pursues its mission through its role as a museum of living plant collections arranged in gardens and landscapes across its National Historic Landmark site; through its comprehensive education programs in horticulture and plant science; and through the wide-ranging research programs of the International Plant Science Center. D PowerPoint Presentation: U.S. Botanic Garden Mission : The U.S. Botanic Garden is dedicated to demonstrating the aesthetic, cultural, economic, therapeutic and ecological importance of plants to the well-being of humankind. The USBG fosters the exchange of ideas and information relevant to national and international partnerships. We carry out this mission by: promoting botanical knowledge through the cultivation of an ordered collection of plants; presenting displays of plants, exhibits and educational programs to the Congress and the public; and, fostering sustainability and plant conservation. D PowerPoint Presentation: Chicago Botanic Garden ’s Mission: We cultivate the power of plants to sustain and enrich life. Matthaei Botanical Gardens and Nichols Arboretum Mission: Promoting environmental enjoyment, stewardship and sustainability through education, research, and interaction with the natural world. The Santa Barbara Botanic Garden fosters the conservation of California's native plants through our gardens, education, and research, and serves as a role model of sustainable practices. D PowerPoint Presentation: Montreal Botanical Garden : Through its efforts in communication, conservation, research and education, the Botanical Garden, like the three other museums that make up the Space for Life – the Biodôme , Insectarium, and Rio Tinto Alcan Planetarium – guides humans to better experience nature. Royal Botanic Garden of Jordan : The mission of the Royal Botanic Garden is to conserve native biodiversity at the habitat level, establish a centre for scientific research and environmental education, serve as a demonstration site for sustainable development, and provide a unique ecotourism destination. D PowerPoint Presentation: The mission of Tofino Botanical Gardens is to inspire conservation of the world’s Temperate Coastal Rainforests Fairchild National Botanical Garden : O ur mission is to save tropical plant diversity by exploring, explaining and conserving the world of tropical plants; fundamental to this task is inspiring a greater knowledge and love for plants and gardening so that all can enjoy the beauty and bounty of the tropical world. D Our own institution’s missions…: Our own institution’s missions… The mission of the Atlanta Botanical Garden as a non-profit is to develop and maintain plant collections for display, education, research, conservation and enjoyment. The mission of The Morton Arboretum is to collect and study trees, shrubs, and other plants from around the world. BGCI ’s mission is: To mobilise botanic gardens and engage partners in securing plant diversity for the well-being of people and the planet. Royal Botanical Gardens mission is to promote the public’s understanding of the relationship between the plant world, society and the environment. D

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