E80480 20070801144125716

Information about E80480 20070801144125716

Published on February 5, 2008

Author: Manuele

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Construction:  Construction Path Surface Materials Path Edge Treatments and Infill Kerb Ramps Road Paving Materials Roadworks and Temporary Closures Maintenance of Cycling Facilities Path Surface Materials:  Path Surface Materials Objective: To illustrate preferred path surface materials, as well as some alternatives which may be useful under special circumstances. Asphalt Paths:  Asphalt Paths MRWA policy is to use asphalt, coloured with red oxide, for shared paths. Despite the preference for red asphalt, other materials such as concrete or brick paving are sometimes used at special locations. Concrete Paths:  Concrete Paths The lifetime and ride quality of concrete paths can be maximised by following construction techniques developed by the Cement and Concrete Association of Australia. Concrete Paths:  Concrete Paths Techniques Include: Use of corrugated lock joints at contraction joints to prevent vertical displacement between concrete sections. Flexible sealing strips at contraction joints to minimise “sand jacking”. Use of closed-cell foam at expansion joints rather than caneite which can encourage growth of grass and weeds. Concrete Paths:  Concrete Paths Techniques (continued): Broom finishing right up to joints rather than traditional tooled joints which raise the surface either side of the joint. Special floating techniques to minimise longitudinal undulations in the surface. Proper surface preparation and compaction. The extra cost for the lock joints, etc. is typically 2-3% of the path cost. Brick Paved Paths:  Brick Paved Paths Particularly in inner city areas, brick paving may be preferred for aesthetic reasons. Brick Paved Paths:  Brick Paved Paths Brick paving can be suitable for short sections of shared paths, provided it is: Laid so as to provide a smooth, flat surface, Adequately constrained, e.g. by kerbs or edging to prevent movement. In particular, any longitudinal gaps can be very hazardous for cyclists. Bricks with bevelled edges should not be used as the resultant longitudinal grooves can affect bicycle steering and handling. Timber Surfaces:  Timber Surfaces Although less common on road bridges in Western Australia than in other states, timber decks are sometimes used on shared path bridges. New bridges should be constructed with the planking perpendicular to the direction of travel to avoid the situation pictured, where longitudinal gaps can trap bicycle wheels. Timber Surfaces:  Timber Surfaces Austroads Part 14 also highlights the need to avoid timber surfaces where damp or shady conditions are to be expected, as a slippery surface is likely. Alternatively, a non-slip coating may be applied to the timber surface. Path Surface Materials:  Path Surface Materials Key Points: MRWA policy is for red asphalt paths. References: MRWA Cycling Policy, Section 2.2.7. Austroads Part 14, Section 8.5 Path Edge Treatments and Infill:  Path Edge Treatments and Infill Objective: To illustrate treatments for path edges to delineate obstructions and minimise maintenance requirements. Path Edge Treatments:  Path Edge Treatments Often, the useful width of a shared path beside a road is reduced due to the presence of sign and light poles. Path Edge Treatments:  Path Edge Treatments Provided there is sufficient width, line marking can be used to delineate the nominal path width. As this example shows, the edgelines defines the usable path area, with reasonable clearance to poles, fences, etc. The distance between the kerb and the nearest edgeline also provides an additional safety margin for path users, especially important where the road carries heavy, fast moving traffic. Path Edge Treatments:  Path Edge Treatments In this example, awkward areas between the path and road have been filled with lightly textured limestone paving. Path Edge Treatments:  Path Edge Treatments Although clearance is required between the edge of a path and a retaining wall, the narrow strip of ground between the path and wall can be a hazard, especially if it has a soft surface. A better alternative would be to extend the path surface up to the wall and apply an edgeline to indicate the clearance zone. Path Edge Treatments:  Path Edge Treatments In grassed areas, a concrete edging strip on asphalt paths reduces damage to the path edge from grass growing into it. The concrete edge also provides a permanent visual contrast at the path edge. Path Edge Treatments and Infill:  Path Edge Treatments and Infill Key Points: Treatments should be safe if cyclists ride onto them. Treatments should be visually distinctive. Kerb Ramps:  Kerb Ramps Objective: To illustrate important construction requirements for kerb ramps. Kerb Ramps:  Kerb Ramps Construction details from MRWA standard drawing: Edge of ramp to be flush with finished road pavement. If asphalt to be applied later, it shall overlay lower section of ramp. Concrete to be broom finished, across direction of pedestrian or bicycle traffic to provide a non-slip surface. Concrete class shall be N20. Kerb Ramps:  Kerb Ramps The depth of concrete at edge of kerb ramp should be at least 100 mm to ensure adequate strength. The photo shows a kerb ramp in which the concrete has been placed on top of the road surface. The resulting thin concrete has little strength and has broken away at the thin edge. The edge of the road should be excavated to achieve the required depth at the edge of the kerb ramp. Kerb Ramps:  Kerb Ramps Note that mountable kerb is not a suitable alternative to a kerb ramp. Typically, the slope of mountable kerb is about 1 in 5 – twice as steep as the maximum of 1 in 10 for a kerb ramp. Also, mountable kerb usually has a lip of 20 – 30 mm which is totally unacceptable for bicycle or wheelchair use. Kerb Ramps:  Kerb Ramps Key Points: Road surface must be cut out to get sufficient depth for concrete. Junction with road surface must be flush. Slope and other design requirements must be adhered to. References: MRWA Cycling Policy Section 2.2.9. MRWA Drawing 9831-5649. Austroads Part 14, Section 6.7.3.3. AS 1428 Road Paving Materials:  Road Paving Materials Objective: To highlight special considerations for road surfacing, to cater for on-road cycling. Road Paving Materials:  Road Paving Materials As mentioned in the Design section, LATM treatments can introduce rough surfaces, due to use of diverse paving materials. In this example, the brick paving at the flush entry statement has settled over time, resulting in serious bumps at the junction with the asphalt paving. Road Paving Materials:  Road Paving Materials A faux brick overlay over a concrete surface, can provide a more durable surface for entry statements and other LATM treatments. Road Paving Materials:  Road Paving Materials The surface of shoulders and bicycle lanes should be at least as smooth as the adjoining road surface, to provide a smooth cycling surface. In this example, the brown surface for the shoulder provides a colour contrast, but the surface is noticeable rougher than the road. Surface materials such as brick paving should not be used for shoulders or bicycle lanes. Road Paving Materials:  Road Paving Materials Key Points: Surfaces should be smooth and stable. References: Austroads Part 14, Section 8.2 Roadwork’s and Maintenance :  Roadwork’s and Maintenance Objective: To outline measures for roadworks and temporary closures, to minimise the impact in terms of both convenience and safety for cyclists and other path users. There are guidelines on the provisions for all path users at roadwork sites in built up areas available at Main Roads website www.mainroads.wa.gov.au under cycling/pedestrians. Roadwork Signs:  Roadwork Signs Temporary roadworks signs should be placed clear of bicycle lanes or shoulders and shared paths. Roadwork Signs:  Roadwork Signs This is a good example of a roadworks information sign which has a cantilever support to avoid obstructing the path (in this case, a footpath). Path Closures:  Path Closures Occasionally, it may be necessary to close a shared path due to major construction work or special events. Path Closures:  Path Closures Wherever possible, signs should be erected in advance of the closure (e.g. 7 days) so that regular path users can plan alternative routes. Bear in mind that viable alternative routes may not be available for some key sections of shared path. Path Closures:  Path Closures Alternatives to total closure may be: Temporary use of a lane of an adjacent road. Maintaining limited path access, e.g. requiring cyclists to walk their bikes past the work site. Path Closures and Detours:  Path Closures and Detours Detour signs should be placed at key locations. Note that information and/or detour signs may be required some distance from the actual closure, to avoid path users having to backtrack to reach alternative routes. Path Closures and Detours:  Path Closures and Detours As an example, Rally Australian usually involves closure of the shared path along the Perth foreshore between Plain Street and Victoria Avenue. Signs are needed at both ends of the Causeway and Narrows bridges, to enable path users to use the alternative route via the South Perth foreshore. Path Closures and Detours:  Path Closures and Detours In this example, part of a disused road pavement (to the right of the barriers) was excluded from the construction site and used as a temporary shared path. The original shared path (approx. 100 m away) had to be removed to make way for the construction works. Path Closures and Detours:  Path Closures and Detours Even for short term works, signs should be placed near approach path far enough in advance to allow cyclists to slow down and stop if necessary. Path Closures and Detours:  Path Closures and Detours Note that orange “safety” mesh can itself be a hazard adjacent to shared paths, as the open mesh can catch bicycle pedals, etc. Ideally, such mesh should not be used immediately adjacent to the path surface. The danger can be minimised by ensuring that the mesh is well supported and tightly stretched, otherwise it can be affected by winds and billow out. Path Closures and Detours:  Path Closures and Detours Barriers such as gates across paths should have prominent reflective treatment if they are to be left in place during hours of darkness. Typically galvanised fence components, such as in this example, do not show up well at night. Note that minor adjustments to the boundaries of the fence compound would have left the path open to access the underpass at right. Works Near Paths:  Works Near Paths Temporary fences or structures adjacent to operating paths should follow Austroads Part 14 guidelines for clearances, etc. or be suitably delineated. This metal stake associated with event infrastructure is an obvious hazard and should not have been located in close proximity to a path. Works Near Paths:  Works Near Paths Temporary hoses or cables across paths should be placed at right angle to the path, to minimise the risk to cyclists. This is a poor example as the hose runs diagonally across a T-junction. Works Near Paths:  Works Near Paths Temporary power cables across paths may require protection from path traffic but, unlike this example, the cover treatment should be smoothly ramped to avoid damage to bicycle wheels, etc. Roadworks and Temporary Closures:  Roadworks and Temporary Closures Key Points: Consideration for cyclists and, in the case of paths, for other path users should be an integral part of planning for roadworks and closures. Closures and detours should be implemented in a safe manner, with adequate warning. References: MRWA Cycling Policy, Section 2.4. Austroads Part 14, Appendix B Maintenance of Cycling Facilities:  Maintenance of Cycling Facilities Objective: To highlight particular maintenance requirements for on-road and off-road cycling facilities Maintenance of Cycling Facilities:  Maintenance of Cycling Facilities Removal of debris and foreign materials. Maintenance of Cycling Facilities:  Maintenance of Cycling Facilities Repair of damaged paths. Maintenance of Cycling Facilities:  Maintenance of Cycling Facilities Removal of vegetation obstructing vision or affecting the pavement. Maintenance of Cycling Facilities:  Maintenance of Cycling Facilities Repair of vandal damage to signs, structures or paths. Maintenance of Cycling Facilities:  Maintenance of Cycling Facilities Maintenance of drainage grates is important to maintain a smooth riding surface. Road resurfacing may require adjustments to drainage grates to match the new pavement level. Maintenance of Cycling Facilities:  Maintenance of Cycling Facilities Key Points: Prompt attention to maintenance is essential to preserve integrity of cycling facilities. References: MRWA Cycling Policy, Section 2.3 Austroads Part 14, Section 8

Related presentations


Other presentations created by Manuele

Behavior and Attitudes
17. 01. 2008
0 views

Behavior and Attitudes

11128130511Andrea Goldstein
08. 05. 2008
0 views

11128130511Andrea Goldstein

Research
02. 05. 2008
0 views

Research

HOCU Trivia Bee
24. 04. 2008
0 views

HOCU Trivia Bee

2007410123747218
16. 04. 2008
0 views

2007410123747218

GC London pres good pr
08. 04. 2008
0 views

GC London pres good pr

gpmfbkgrnd
03. 04. 2008
0 views

gpmfbkgrnd

mentals
21. 03. 2008
0 views

mentals

16 hotelreps
19. 03. 2008
0 views

16 hotelreps

MobilityProject
14. 03. 2008
0 views

MobilityProject

silverswords
11. 03. 2008
0 views

silverswords

REMOTE SENSING
22. 01. 2008
0 views

REMOTE SENSING

democracy
09. 01. 2008
0 views

democracy

accidents
18. 01. 2008
0 views

accidents

TenSecretsChallenges
29. 01. 2008
0 views

TenSecretsChallenges

orientation 2007
10. 01. 2008
0 views

orientation 2007

Ch19
24. 01. 2008
0 views

Ch19

socrates plato aristotle
05. 02. 2008
0 views

socrates plato aristotle

3CH9L7
14. 01. 2008
0 views

3CH9L7

winch14
28. 01. 2008
0 views

winch14

Personal Eschatology
29. 01. 2008
0 views

Personal Eschatology

symposium NOLA updated
14. 02. 2008
0 views

symposium NOLA updated

VSA Power Point Presentation
26. 02. 2008
0 views

VSA Power Point Presentation

T Suni
08. 01. 2008
0 views

T Suni

01PMTCTPackage
15. 01. 2008
0 views

01PMTCTPackage

redistricting
11. 01. 2008
0 views

redistricting

GMCotton
25. 01. 2008
0 views

GMCotton

WorldBankBondWeb
15. 01. 2008
0 views

WorldBankBondWeb

MLA Breakfast Memphis Feb06
15. 01. 2008
0 views

MLA Breakfast Memphis Feb06

YSF 2006 Kehinde Adesanya
07. 02. 2008
0 views

YSF 2006 Kehinde Adesanya

rize
07. 02. 2008
0 views

rize