early care & education

Information about early care & education

Published on July 29, 2014

Author: CPEIP

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PowerPoint Presentation: Trauma Informed Early Care and Education Trauma-Informed Early Care & Education: Trauma-Informed Early Care & Education PowerPoint Presentation: Early Care & Education: The Need What We Know: The emotional life of the child sets the course for health, learning and happiness . 4 What We Know Early Childhood Holds the Greatest Opportunity and the Most Vulnerability: Early Childhood Holds the Greatest Opportunity and the Most Vulnerability 5 Many Children Are Already Left Behind By Kindergarten: Many Children Are Already Left Behind By Kindergarten 6 Hart, B. and Risley , T.R., (2003). The Early Catastrophe: the 30 Million Word Gap by Age 3. American Educator, 27 (1), 4-9. Most Maltreated Children Have Developmental Problems: 7 Most Maltreated Children Have Developmental Problems PowerPoint Presentation: 54% < Age 5: Infants are Florida’s Largest Age Group 8 Trauma Informed Schools: Trauma Informed Schools 9 * Source: National Child Traumatic Stress Network 1 of 4 School children exposed to a traumatic event. Family Income Is Best Predictor of Children’s School Success: Family Income I s Best Predictor of Children’s School Success Widening Academic Gap Rich students are increasingly entering kindergarten much better prepared to succeed than middle class students or poor students. This difference in preparation persists through high school. Reardon, Sean. (2013, April 27). No Rich Child Left Behind. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/27/no-rich-child-left-behind / At kindergarten 15 IQ point difference In high school 125 point difference on 800 SAT test The Effects of Poverty on Development: The Effects of Poverty on Development Impact of Poverty on the Brain: Impact of Poverty on the Brain Inadequate Nutrition Substance Abuse Maternal Depression Exposure to Environmental Toxins Trauma/Abuse Quality of Daily Care To Early Brain Development Impact of Poverty Impact of Poverty on School Readiness: Impact of Poverty on School Readiness Children in poverty Fare worse than peers on almost every indicator of health and well-being Score 15 IQ points lower at kindergarten Have 30 million fewer words Poverty is the strongest pr edictor of neglect, abuse, exposure to violence, substance abuse, toxic stress, or trauma. Drivers of Developmental Trajectories: Nurturing & Responsive Care PreK & Quality Child Care Targeted Supports Health Services Early Intervention Healthy At-Risk Delayed or Disordered Ready to Learn Drivers of Developmental Trajectories Poverty Lack of Health Services Trauma & Toxic Stress Wrong Direction for Florida’s Children: Wrong Direction for Florida’s Children Trends are up Special healthcare needs Child behavior problems Child maltreatment Births to women with HS education or less Poverty ACE Study: ACE Study Physical abuse Emotional abuse Sexual abuse An alcohol and/or drug abuser in the household Someone who is chronically depressed, mentally, ill, institutionalized, or suicidal One or no parents Emotional or physical neglect ACEs Questionnaire The Relationship of Adverse Childhood Experiences & Adult Health Widespread Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences : Source: V. Felitti , 2005 Widespread Prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences Substance abuse 27% Parental separation/divorce 23% Mental illness 17% Battered mother 13% Incarcerated family member 6% Household dysfunction Psychological 11% Physical 28% Sexual 21% Emotional 15% Physical 10% Abuse Neglect Of 17,000 respondents , 2/3s had at least 1 ACE . ACE Scores Linked to Physical & Mental Health Problems: ACE Scores Linked to Physical & Mental Health Problems One in six people had 4 or more ACEs. People with 4 or more ACEs were: Twice as likely to be smokers . Seven times as likely to be alcoholics . Men with 6 or more ACEs were 46 times as likely to inject drugs. ACE Scores Linked to Physical & Mental Health Problems: ACE Scores Linked to Physical & Mental Health Problems People with 4+ ACEs were likely to: Be sexually active before age 15: 6x Have cancer or heart disease: 2x Attempt suicide: 12x People with 7+ ACEs had: A 360% higher risk for heart disease, even if they did not smoke, drink, or carry extra weight Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. Information available at http://www.cdc.gov/ace/index.htm High ACEs in Head Start Sample: High ACEs in Head Start Sample Source: C . Blodgett, 2012 60% exposed to violence when <age 4 Mean ACE was >3 Mean ACE of their parent’s score was >5 2/3 of children with positive ACE screen had one report of social-emotional development concerns, as determined by teacher and parent DECA Head Start Children (N=50) ACEs Among Young Children: SOURCE: National Survey of Children's Health. NSCH 2011/12 All Children 0-5 Years Old In Households Between 0%-100% of Family Poverty Level All Children 0-5 Years Old ACEs Among Young Children ACEs Increase Odds for Academic & Health Problems: Academic Failure Severe Attendance Problems Severe School Behavior Concerns Frequent Reported Poor Health 3 or More ACEs N =248 3 5 6 4 2 ACEs N=213 2.5 2.5 4 2.5 1 ACE N=476 1.5 2 2.5 2 No Known ACEs N=1,164 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.0 Source: C. Blodgett, 2012 ACEs Increase Odds for Academic & Health Problems Impact of Toxic Stress Over Lifetime: Impact of Toxic Stress Over Lifetime ACE Study Shows an indisputable relationship b etween Adverse Childhood Experiences & Adult Health PowerPoint Presentation: Early Care & Education: The Vision Trauma Informed Care : Trauma Informed Care 25 Have I considered whether trauma has played a role? Ask trauma informed questions Use a trauma lens to understand behavior Screen as part of services Ensure emotional safety Avoid re - traumatization Consider trauma in all decisions (childcare placement, referrals, etc). Success by Kindergarten Predicts Life Success: Success by Kindergarten Predicts Life Success 26 Chetty , R. Friedman, J., Hilger , N., Saez , Emmanuel, Schanzenback , D. & Yagan , D. (2010) Wage Earnings College Attendance Home Ownership Retirement Savings “The more we do to ensure that all children have similar cognitively stimulating early childhood experiences, the less we will have to worry about failing schools.” : “The more we do to ensure that all children have similar cognitively stimulating early childhood experiences, the less we will have to worry about failing schools.” “We need to take a lesson from the rich and invest much more heavily as a society in our children’s educational opportunities from the day they are born. Investments in early childhood education pay very high societal dividends. That means investing in developing high-quality childcare and preschool that is available to poor and middle class children. It also means recruiting and training a cadre of skilled preschool teachers and child care providers. These are not new ideas, but we have to stop talking about how expensive and difficult they are to implement and just get on with it!” Reardon, Sean. (2013, April 27). No Rich Child Left Behind. The New York Times. Retrieved from http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/27/no-rich-child-left-behind / Opportunity for Change: Opportunity for Change With growing attention and investments in early childhood, we have an unprecedented opportunity for the next generation of children. B uilding health, school readiness and social well-being for children requires embracing the science of early brain and child development, mitigating risk and building resiliency. Early childhood leaders must embrace the science and adopt a collective impact approach to lead transformation and change. 28 PowerPoint Presentation: Early Care & Education: In Practice Trauma in Young Children: Trauma in Young Children Trauma is an event that is unpredictable, produces a feeling of helplessness, and overwhelms one’s capacity to cope. Toxic Stress & Trauma: Toxic Stress & Trauma Frequent or continual stress on young children who lack adequate protection and support from adults is strongly associated with increases in the risks of lifelong health and social problems . “Trauma can be a single event, connected series of traumatic events, or chronic lasting stress.” Diagnostic Classification: 0-3R : “ Trauma can be a single event, connected series of traumatic events, or chronic lasting stress.” Diagnostic Classification : 0- 3R Illness or medical procedure Serious accident or hospitalization Traumatic grief or separation Fire , hurricane, flood, earthquake, or other disaster War, terrorism, political violence Physical, sexual, emotional or psychological maltreatment Witness to violence at home, school, or neighborhood Neglect Family disruption (moves, loss of job, illness, death , divorce, incarceration ) Myths About Early Childhood Trauma: 33 Myths About Early Childhood Trauma First Five Years Hold Most Opportunity & Vulnerability : First Five Years Hold Most Opportunity & Vulnerability 34 Left Behind By Kindergarten Baby’s Brain: Baby’s Brain 35 Exquisitely dependent on relationships & experiences to thrive. Critical Periods for Brain Development : Critical Periods for Brain Development 36 Time: 5:18 Brain Plasticity: The Capacity to Grow or Diminish: Brain Plasticity: The Capacity to Grow or Diminish Raising children in enriched or impoverished environments impacts the development of neural circuits. ZERO TO THREE BrainWonders 37 Cognitive Development Neglect Impacts Prefrontal Lobe Reducing Executive Functions: Cognitive Development Neglect Impacts Prefrontal Lobe Reducing Executive Functions Healthy Child Neglected Child Courtesy of Dr. H.T. Chugani from the Children’s Hospital of Michigan, Wayne State University PowerPoint Presentation: 39 Shawn insert the NSCDC slide on Persistent Stress Changes Brain Architecture 39 Executive Functioning: Higher order mental abilities are needed to deal with confusing and unpredictable situations or information . Executive Functioning Stress Compromises Learning & Executive Functioning : Stress Compromises Learning & Executive Functioning The prefrontal cortex, an essential part of the brain for self regulation, is most affected by early stress. As a result, children in stressful environments find it harder to concentrate , sit still, follow directions, or rebound from disappointment. Uncontrollable impulses and negative feelings make it hard to learn. 41 Symptoms of Trauma in Young Children: Symptoms of Trauma in Young Children Sleep troubles, nightmares, fear of falling asleep Loss of appetite, refusal to eat Headaches, stomach aches, aches and pains Increased aggressive behavior and angry feelings Hyperactivity (very high activity level) Hyper vigilance (constant worry about possible danger) Repetitive play about a violent event Loss of skills learned earlier (toilet training, language skills) Different Aged Children React Differently to Trauma: Different Aged Children React Differently to Trauma Babies Toddlers From clingy to flat affect with no joy Prolonged u ncontrollable crying Doesn’t explore No preferred caregiver Failure to thrive Biting, kicking, tantrums, unprovoked aggression Disinterested in toys Indiscriminate preferences of caregivers. No appetite Preschool School Age Repetitive play about violent event Sleep troubles or nightmares Hyper vigilance Skill r egression Grades drop Preoccupied with the trauma Poor self-esteem Bedwetting or thumb sucking may reappear 43 Infant/Toddler Reactions to Stress: Infant/Toddler Reactions to Stress Aggression Clinging Crying Defiance Eating problems Fearfulness Inattention Irritability Nightmares Over-activity Physical complaints Rebellion Regression Sadness Sleep disturbance Temper tantrums Under-activity Vomiting Infant Toddler Feelings Associated with Separation: Infant Toddler Feelings Associated with Separation Abandonment Ambivalence Anger Anxiety Confusion Depression Fearfulness Frustration Grief Guilt Loss of control Loss of power Rejection Relief Sadness Trauma Informed Early Care & Education: Signs of Trauma in Toddlers Biting , kicking, tantrums, unprovoked aggression Lack of verbal skills to express emotions Disengagement with others Indiscriminate preferences of caregivers Skill regression Trauma Informed Early Care & Education Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child: Harvard University’s Center on the Developing Child Untreated Adverse Early Childhood Events Only Exacerbate Over Time : Untreated Adverse Early Childhood Events Only Exacerbate Over Time Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study. Information available at http://www.cdc.gov/ace/index.htm Transgenerational Transmission: Transgenerational Transmission Mothers who report experiencing stress during pregnancy are more likely to have babies who are hyperactive and developmentally delayed. Newborns of depressed mothers are more irritable and hard to soothe, have more problems sleeping, and have higher levels of the stress hormone cortisol in their blood. “ …the handing down of a susceptibility from parent to child. ” 49 Critical & Sensitive Periods for Development: Critical & Sensitive Periods for Development 50 Trajectory for Billy’s Mom with Her Untreated Adverse Early Childhood: Trajectory for Billy’s Mom with Her Untreated Adverse Early Childhood 51 Adulthood ACEs Suffers Psychiatric Problems Is Depressed Battles Addictions Adolescence ACEs Has Mental Health Issues Sexually Active & Becomes Pregnant as a Teen Smokes Childhood ACEs Witnesses Domestic Violence Experiences Child Abuse & Neglect Physical Development Height & Weight, Nutrition, Physical Activity, Dental, Vision & Hearing : On target for height & weight Regular checkups Immunizations up-to-date Good teeth Excellent health Breastfed, so good immunities Bottom percentile for weight Malnourished and anemic Bottle mouth & rotten teeth Chronic untreated ear infections with possible hearing loss Compromised lung function from second-hand smoke No immunizations Bleeding diaper rash Physical Development Height & Weight, Nutrition, Physical Activity , Dental , Vision & Hearing 52 Lucian Billy Speech & Language Development: Points to get what he needs Ear infections make it hard to hear words No words No books in the house Watches TV Never been read to or sung to Vocabulary of 300 words Can point and name correct animal in book “ Show me the dog ” Carries out directions Initiates 5-word sentences Asks for what he needs Knows songs, rhymes & fingerplays Speech & Language Development 53 Lucian Billy Speech & Language Development: Speech & Language Development Vocabulary at age 3 Poor children: 525 words Working class: 749 words Professional: 1,116 words According to Hart & Risley , By age 4, the average child in a poor family might have been exposed to 30 million fewer words than a child in a professional family . 54 Left behind by kindergarten, children living in poverty average 15 IQ points below their peers. Motor Development Gross & Fine Motor Development, Self-Help Skills : Billy Prefers crawling but can run Drinks from bottle not cup Eats with fingers Has never used spoon or fork Uses pincher grasp to pick up cigarette butts & food from floor Still in diapers Lucian Runs & jumps Drinks unassisted from a cup Feeds self with spoon & fork Can undress self Sits on potty but still wears pull-ups at night Can work puzzles & stack blocks Can turn on dad ’ s iPhone & play Motor Development Gross & Fine Motor Development , Self-Help Skills 55 Motor Development: Motor Development Skill regression: prefers crawling but can run Uses pincher grasp to pick up cigarette butts and food from floor Still in diapers Cognitive Development: Cognitive Development Eagerness & Curiosity Persistence Creativity & Problem-Solving Vocabulary 57 Cognitive Development Eagerness & Curiosity; Persistence; Creativity & Problem-Solving; Vocabulary: Cognitive Development Eagerness & Curiosity; Persistence; Creativity & Problem-Solving; Vocabulary Creativity & Problem-Solving Curiosity Persistence-finds hidden food Imitates mom smoking with stick Minimum receptive language Creativity & Problem-Solving Plays make believe with stuffed animals Can name all his body parts Can count to 10 Can work mechanical toy Vocabulary 58 Lucian Billy Social & Emotional Development: Social & Emotional Development Trust & Emotional Security Self-Regulation Self-Concept 59 What are their emotional needs?: What are their emotional needs? 60 Trust & Emotional Security: . 61 Capacity to f orm close, secure relationships Security in “going out” to explore Trust & Emotional Security Social Emotional Development Trust & Emotional Security, Self-Regulation, Self-Concept: Social Emotional Development Trust & Emotional Security, Self-Regulation, Self-Concept Flat affect Mother is his attachment figure Runs to mother when distressed Stays near mother for protection Needs his “cup” filled Range of emotions Happy, emotionally calm, balanced Expresses affection warmly Comforts other kids when hurt Uses Dad as secure base from which to explore world Reciprocity in relationship “Fills up his cup” 62 Billy Lucian Still Face Video: Edward Tronick, Time: 4:22: Still Face Video: Edward Tronick , Time: 4:22 63 Still Face Video B/W Version Time: 2:08: Still Face Video B/W Version Time: 2 :08 64 PowerPoint Presentation: Early Care & Education: Recommendations Challenging Behaviors: Challenging Behaviors How often do we punish or redirect challenging behaviors without addressing the underlying trauma? 66 Understand Executive Functioning to Reframe “Bad Kids” : Understand Executive Functioning to Reframe “Bad Kids” Often, these are kids with history of toxic stress and adverse childhood experiences. What is Infant Mental Health?: What is Infant Mental Health? Social, emotional & behavioral well-being; Capacity to experience, regulate, express emotion; Form close, secure relationships; Explore the environment and learn Is the child happy?: Is the child happy ? Think of “ being with ” rather than “ doing ” activities. Pyramid to Promote Social Emotional Competence in Infants & Young Children: Source: The Center on the Social and Emotional Foundations for Early Learning Pyramid to Promote Social Emotional Competence in Infants & Young Children 70 Universal Promotion Prevention Treatment 80% 15% 5% High quality parenting is a powerful buffer against the damage that adversity inflicts on a child’s stress-response system.: High quality parenting is a powerful buffer against the damage that adversity inflicts on a child’s stress-response system. 71 Development of Attachment: Development of Attachment 0-7 months 7-12 months 12-24 months 24-35 months Social with all. Preferences limited to voice and smell. May have more comfort with same caregiver. Hierarchy of preferred caregivers. Stranger anxiety. Separation protests appear. Looks to familiar adult to determine if situation is safe or dangerous. Attachment figure becomes secure base. Proximity promotes security. Returns to attachment figure, if distressed. Clings to familiar adult when in strange situations. Balance between autonomy and dependence. Legacy of Early Nurturing: 73 Legacy of Early Nurturing Zhang, Tie-Yuan; Meaney , Michael (2010). Epigenetics and the Environmental Regulation of the Genome and Its Function. Annual Review of Psychology (61): 439-466. Pups of high licking mothers were much better off (healthier, more social, better at mazes, lived longer) than pups of low licking moms. Licking triggers a cascade of hormonal responses that reduces stress. Pups of high licking moms had biological changes (big variations in the size and complexity in the part of the brain regulating stress) O ffspring of low licking mothers placed with high licking foster moms were able to produce high licking offspring. When pup received high licking as baby, it grew up to be healthier & better adjusted, whether or not its biological mother did the licking. Foster mother rats compensated for inadequate biological mother rats. Strengthening Families: Protective Factors to Prevent Child Abuse Center for the Study of Social Policy: Nurturing & attachment Knowledge of child development and parenting Parental resilience and ability to cope Network family, friends & neighbors Concrete supports for basic needs Strengthening Families: Protective Factors to Prevent Child Abuse Center for the Study of Social Policy What Can Improve Parents’ Capacity for Nurturing?: What Can Improve Parents’ Capacity for Nurturing? Address parents' issues so their problems do not interfere with caregiving . 75 Trauma Informed Early Intervention: Trauma Informed Early Intervention 76 High Quality Environments: 77 High Quality Environments PowerPoint Presentation: High Quality Child Care Can Produce Long-Term Benefits 78 High Quality Early Childhood Programs: High Quality Early Childhood Programs Carolina Abecedarian Chicago Public Schools Perry Preschool Infant Health & Development Program Early Head Start Educare High Quality Child Care Could Turn the Curve for Florida’s Most Vulnerable Children: High Quality Child Care Could Turn the Curve for Florida’s Most Vulnerable Children Enhance development Larger vocabularies Better reading skills Higher math competencies Higher IQ and school readiness scores GRIT/Executive functioning Foster nurturing relationships Improved social emotional development Reduced behavior challenges Is a protective factor for maltreatment 80 Strategically Improve Childcare in High Risk Zip Codes: Strategically Improve Childcare in High Risk Zip Codes Child Care Options: Child Care Options 84 10 Components of Quality: 1. Licensed Programs Following Appropriate Health & Safety Practices 2. Staff Well-Trained in Early Childhood Development 3. Age Appropriate Environments 4. Small Groups with Optimal Ratios 5. Primary Caregiving & Continuity of Care 6. Active & Responsive Caregiving to Support Children ’ s Development 7. Curriculum, Observation & Individual Programming 8. Emerging Language & Literacy 9. Family Involvement & Cultural Continuity 10. Comprehensive Services 10 Components of Quality Which is quality?: Which is quality? 86 Caregivers on the floor wi th children Large groups of children in car seats Which is quality?: Floor time to explore Confined contraption Which is quality? 87 Which is quality?: Babies spending the majority of their days in their cribs Opportunities to learn Which is quality? 88 Which is quality?: Disorganized sparsely equipped room Labeled shelves with multiple sets of same toy at child’s level with lots of choices Which is quality? 89 Which is quality?: Using diaper time for connecting “How long until I can get away from these crying kids?” Which is quality? 90 What Contributes to the Emotional Quality of Childcare?: What Contributes to the Emotional Quality of Childcare? Degreed early childhood caregivers Small group size and ratios Knowledgeable caregivers Primary responsive caregiver Continuity of caregivers Understand Children’s Underlying Emotional Needs in Challenging Behaviors: Understand Children’s Underlying Emotional Needs in Challenging Behaviors Caregivers read children’s cues accurately & respond in a developmentally appropriate manner.: Caregivers read children ’ s cues accurately & respond in a developmentally appropriate manner. Cue / Miscue: Cue / Miscue Show a need Hide a need Shift From Discipline to Nurturing: Shift From Discipline to Nurturing Time in, instead of time out Do you want to put words to your tears?: Do you want to put words to your tears? Filling Up the Cup: Filling Up the Cup Being With: Being With Caregivers respond with warmth & affection to children’s attempts to engage.: Caregivers respond with warmth & affection to children ’ s attempts to engage. Children seek & caregivers provide physical and emotional comfort to children when they are upset.: Children seek & caregivers provide physical and emotional comfort to children when they are upset. Caregivers anticipate the need for reassurance and help children adjust to new situations with physical proximity and security objects. : Caregivers anticipate the need for reassurance and help children adjust to new situations with physical proximity and security objects. Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation to Child Care: Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation to Child Care Reduces children’s problem behaviors when least costly and most amenable to intervention, which reduces costs, reduces expulsions, improves school readiness, & reduces likelihood of later behavior problems. 102 Findings: Reduced behavior problems in target children Reduced expulsions Improved classroom environments and teacher-child interactions Increased teacher beliefs and practices regarding developmentally appropriate and child centered practices Decreased teacher job stress and depression & increased teacher sense of job control and satisfaction Improved sensitivity and classroom management Improved classroom climate More positive interactions More skilled to handle difficult behavior Lower stress for teachers Source: Raver, et al, 2008 and Gilliam, 2007 Findings Targeted Social Emotional Supports: Targeted Social Emotional Supports Goal is to increase teaching and learning time to reduce time spent on discipline Targeted Supports: Targeted Supports 105 Screening for all children ASQ & ASQ-SE and/or trauma screen ECMHC to help with coaching on social emotional skills Fostering executive functioning skills In-depth assessment & treatment Referring child/family for more intensive therapy Challenging Behaviors & Consequences: Challenging Behaviors & Consequences Common Challenging Behaviors Don’t stay on task Impulsive Can’t sit still Lose control of emotions Easily distracted Easily frustrated Don’t follow instructions Poor coping skills Common Consequences Punishment Expulsion Medication Targeted Developmental & Emotional Supports : Targeted Developmental & Emotional Supports IDEA Part C: Ages 0-3 IDEA, Part B: Ages 3-18 Supporting Social Emotional Development: Supporting Social Emotional Development Learning Standards: Social Emotional Development Effects of Trauma on Social Emotional Development Target of ARC Model by Blaustein & Kinniburgh Trust & Emotional Security Mistrust, Insecurity & inability to form secure relationships Foster Attachment Self-Regulation Inability to control emotions & behaviors Foster Self-Regulation Self-Concept Poor self worth and inability to meet age-appropriate Foster Competency Head Start: Trauma Smart: Head Start: Trauma Smart Dr. Mimi A. Graham, Director FSU Center for Prevention & Early Intervention Policy Crittenton Children’s Center in Kansas City, MO Head Start Trauma Smart Goal: To create trauma-informed early childhood environment for all children.: Head Start T rauma Smart Goal: To create trauma-informed early childhood environment for all children. 110 Entire school staff ( teachers, bus drivers, kitchen and secretarial staff) and family trained to watch for a child’s emotional needs, help the child recognize them, then help the child problem-solve or go to a “calm down spot.” Head Start: Trauma Smart: Head Start: Trauma Smart Dr. Mimi A. Graham, Director FSU Center for Prevention & Early Intervention Policy Licensed, masters level therapists trained in trauma informed treatment models provide on-site therapy services for children and families Weekly classroom consultation Monthly parent group training by therapists Head Start Trauma Smart Improved CLASS Scores: Head Start T rauma Smart Improved CLASS Scores 112 CLASS S c o r es All Si t es Oc t ober 2010 Baseline All Si t es April 2011 All Si t es Oc t ober 2011 All Si t es April 2012 All Si t es Oc t ober 2012 National Mean P ositi v e Class r oom Clim at e 4.56 4.36 5.01 5.16 5.59 5.28 Ne g ati v e Class r oom Clim at e 1.76 1.73 1.50 1.73 1.39 1.55 T eacher Sensitivity 4.00 3.95 4.15 4.48 4.67 4.70 R espect f or Stude n t P e r specti v es 3.59 3.65 4.04 4.33 4.44 4.36 Beh a vior Mana g eme n t 4.20 4.27 4.88 4.61 4.78 4.97 P r oductivity 4.58 4.63 5.32 5.26 5.00 4.50 In s tructional Learning F orm a ts 3.29 3.05 3.75 3.71 3.83 3.90 Conce p t D e v elopme n t 1.76 1.55 1.32 1.76 1.90 2.09 Quality of F eedback 2.18 2.02 1.70 2.04 2.55 2.04 Langua g e Modeling 2.58 2.25 2.10 2.19 2.61 2.85 Emotional Support Domain 4.60 4.56 4.92 5.06 5.33 5.00 Class r oom O r g ani z ation Domain 4.02 3.99 4.65 4.52 4.54 4.50 In s tructional Support Domain 2.17 1.94 1.71 2.00 2.35 2.50 Circle of Security Parent Attending to the Child’s Needs: Circle of Security Parent Attending to the Child’s Needs Developmental Specialists: Expertise : Trauma-informed care Infant mental health for 0-5 Ability to partner with Part C and Part B, when appropriate Developmental Specialists Collective Impact…: Collective Impact… 115 “It’s the most important opportunity for the prevention of health and social problems and disease and disability that has ever been seen.” Dr. Vince Fellitti, Author, ACE Study: “ It’s the most important opportunity for the prevention of health and social problems and disease and disability that has ever been seen. ” Dr. Vince Fellitti , Author, ACE Study Time: 0:52

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