ebipres

Information about ebipres

Published on January 7, 2008

Author: Ariane

Source: authorstream.com

Content

The Elimination of Barriers Initiative Florida Jackie Beck MSW Department of Children and Families:  The Elimination of Barriers Initiative Florida Jackie Beck MSW Department of Children and Families What is Stigma?:  What is Stigma? Negative attitudes and beliefs that lead the general public to fear, reject, avoid, and discriminate against people with mental illnesses. Unfortunately, many incorrectly think that people living with mental health problems are violent, unpredictable, and unable to recover or succeed Stigma:  Stigma “Stigma leads to isolation and discourages people from seeking the treatment they need.”  — President George W. Bush April 28, 2002 Stigma and Discrimination:  Stigma and Discrimination Misconceptions can lead to discrimination, which can prevent people with mental health problems from: Seeking treatment Getting a job Finding housing Taking advantage of opportunities Attitudes and the Numbers:  Attitudes and the Numbers 56% of Americans know someone who has been diagnosed with a mental illness Female, more educated, and wealthier respondents report more comfort with and knowledge of mental health issues. 38% say there is little or no truth to the statement that mental illnesses are genetically inherited and run in families. Sources: National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI), nationwide telephone survey, Feb. 1996. National Mental Health Awareness Campaign (NMHAC), nationwide telephone survey, Sept. The majority of the public views depression, schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, and drug dependence as “very serious” problems. • 57% Americans disagree with the statement that mental illnesses can be diagnosed as accurately as physical illnesses. • 33% of African Americans and 44% of whites say there is a lot or some truth to the idea that medications are as effective for mental illnesses as they are for physical illnesses. Sources: MacArthur Mental Health Module, General Social Survey, 1996. National Mental Health Association (NMHA), nationwide telephone survey, June 1999. NMHAC, Sept. 2000.:  The majority of the public views depression, schizophrenia, alcohol dependence, and drug dependence as “very serious” problems. • 57% Americans disagree with the statement that mental illnesses can be diagnosed as accurately as physical illnesses. • 33% of African Americans and 44% of whites say there is a lot or some truth to the idea that medications are as effective for mental illnesses as they are for physical illnesses. Sources: MacArthur Mental Health Module, General Social Survey, 1996. National Mental Health Association (NMHA), nationwide telephone survey, June 1999. NMHAC, Sept. 2000. Attitudes and the Numbers (2) Slide7:  If faced with a friend with mental health problems, young people pride themselves on their loyalty and ability not to violate a confidence. A majority of young people are skeptical that mental health professionals are useful in treating mental illnesses, and harbor suspicions about their value and motives. While parents’ tolerance for difficult children is growing, young people often think that their peers use mental illnesses as an excuse for bad behavior. Source: NMHAC, eight youth focus groups, April 2000. Attitudes and the Numbers (3) Slide8:  Americans are hesitant to interact with persons with mental illnesses: 38% are unwilling to be friends with a person having mental health difficulties. 64% are unwilling to have a person with schizophrenia as a close co-worker. More than 68% are unwilling to have a person with depression marry into their family.   Source: MacArthur Mental Health Module, 1996. Attitudes and the Numbers (4) Slide9:  Almost half of all Americans—46%—believe that mentally ill people are more violent than the general population. Between 1950 and 1996, the number of Americans who describe mental illness in terms consistent with violent or dangerous behavior nearly doubled. Sources: NMHA, June 1999. MacArthur Mental Health Module, 1996. Attitudes and the Numbers (5) Slide10:  The vast majority of Americans believe that the media too often ridicules people with mental illnesses and portrays them as depressed and dangerous: 84% say people with mental disorders are targets of ridicule. 85% of respondents say the media shows people with mental illnesses as sad and lonely. Only 49% note that people with mental illness are often or sometimes shown as having recovered. Source: NMHAC, Sept. 2000. Attitudes and the Numbers (6) Slide11:  Attitudes and the Numbers (7) Only 45% say people with mental illnesses are often or sometimes portrayed as productive members of society who have jobs and stable relationships. 37% of people surveyed single Depression out as the most commonly portrayed illness, compared to 15% who cite eating disorders and 8% who cite schizophrenia or attention deficit disorder. Suicide:  Suicide Stigma surrounding mental illnesses makes us uncomfortable talking about suicide. Suicide deaths take a tremendous toll on society. Suicide = a serious public health problem- 30,000 suicides annually in U.S. Suicide attempts = 650,000 emergency room visits Florida Statistics:  Florida Statistics Suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death for Florida youth age 15-24. More than twice as many Floridians die by suicide than homicide. In 2002, there were 2,332 suicides – 1004 homicides. More than 10 of Florida’s elderly over age 65 take their own life each week. Florida ranks 13th in the U.S. Source: Florida 2002 Vital Statistics Annual Report Myths vs. Facts:  Myths vs. Facts Myth: Mental health problems cannot affect me. Fact: Mental health problems do not discriminate—they can affect anyone from all ages and all walks of life. Myth: People with mental health problems can’t hold jobs. Fact: Many are productive employees and contributing members of their communities. Myth: There’s no hope for people with mental health problems. Fact: There are more effective treatments, strategies, and community supports than ever before, and even more are on the horizon. Myths vs. Facts (2):  Myths vs. Facts (2) Myth: If you ask someone about his or her suicidal intentions, you may encourage the idea of suicide. Fact: Talking about or asking about suicide will NOT cause a person to kill him or herself nor give them the idea. Myth: Suicide happens without warning and people who talk about killing themselves rarely actually kill themselves. Fact: Most people who die by suicide have given some verbal clues or warning of their intention. Myths vs. Facts (3):  Myth: A person who has lost a close family member to suicide has a lower risk for suicide. Fact: Research has shown that a family history of suicide is a significant risk factor and survivors are 6 times as likely to die by suicide than people that have not been touched by suicide. Myth: All suicidal people are deeply depressed. Fact: Depression is often closely associated with suicidal feelings, but not all people who kill themselves are obviously depressed. Myths vs. Facts (3) Where People First Seek Help:  Where People First Seek Help Family and Friends Prescription Medication 0.2% Non-Prescription Medication 3% Institutional Facility 7% Psychiatrist 8% Religious Figure (Priest, Minister, Rabbi) 9% Therapist/ Counselor 10% General Medical Doctor 16% 47% Recovery & People From Minority Groups:  Recovery & People From Minority Groups Less access to care Often poorer quality of care Underrepresented in research Racism and discrimination is stressful Ethnic and racial communities are often exposed to poverty, and people at the lowest socioeconomic levels are 2 to 3 times move likely to have a mental disorder Culture and Mental Health:  Culture and Mental Health African-Americans In the community, rates of mental illness similar to whites However, higher rates of homelessness and incarceration, leading to higher overall rates of mental illness Less access to mental health care than whites Less likely to receive treatment More frequent misdiagnosis Approximately 63% of African Americans, but only 54% of all Americans believe that depression is a “personal weakness” Culture and Mental Health:  Culture and Mental Health American-Indians and Alaska Natives Research is limited, but suggests that youth and adults have higher rates of mental health problems and disorders Suicide rate is 50% higher than the national rate Availability of care severely limited by poverty, isolation of communities; 20% do not have health insurance, vs. 14% of whites Many use traditional healing Culture and Mental Health:  Culture and Mental Health Asian-Americans Prevalence of mental illnesses is about the same as other Americans However, nearly half experience language barriers when seeking services Stigma and shame are major barriers to getting help Asian-American women have one of the highest suicide rates among all women between 15-24 years of age Culture and Mental Health:  Culture and Mental Health Hispanic-Americans Hispanic youth have higher rates of depressive and anxiety symptoms and suicide attempts than other minority groups Hispanic-Americans are the least likely of ethnic groups to have health insurance After diagnosis, less than 18% actually access mental health services Most Hispanic-Americans seek services from their primary health care providers Older Americans and Mental Health:  Older Americans and Mental Health Mental health problems are not a normal part of aging The rate of suicide is highest among older adults compared to any other age group The suicide rate for persons 85 years and older is twice the national rate Mental Health in the Workplace:  Mental Health in the Workplace Approximately 23% of the workforce experiences a mental health problem annually 66% of workers who have mental illnesses have not sought treatment Children and Serious Emotional Disturbances:  Children and Serious Emotional Disturbances In any given year, 5-9% of children have a serious emotional disturbance (SED) Children with SEDs have a school dropout rate of 50% in comparison to 30% of all students with disabilities Early intervention can have a significant impact on the lives of children with SEDs Why Should You Care?:  Why Should You Care? It could affect you: Your friend, family member, neighbor, coworker, or even you could experience a mental health problem. It’s about fairness: Discrimination in our society is not acceptable. You don’t accept it in other areas of society. It’s preventable: Stigma can be prevented through education, understanding, and action What You Can Do To Counter Stigma:  What You Can Do To Counter Stigma Adopt a “no-stigma” policy at home, at the workplace, at school, at play, and in the community Treat people with mental health problems as you would anyone else, with respect and dignity Avoid labeling people by their diagnosis What You Can Do To Counter Stigma (2):  What You Can Do To Counter Stigma (2) Teach children that mental health is a part of their health and well-being Help develop community services to support people with mental health problems Take personal responsibility by becoming a positive role model What You Can Do To Counter Stigma (3):  What You Can Do To Counter Stigma (3) Research shows that peer-based contact and cooperative interaction with people is the most effective way to counteract prejudice Create opportunities to meet and get to know people who have mental illnesses Realize that statistically, it’s very likely that you already know someone with a mental illness What Is the Elimination of Barriers Initiative (EBI)?:  What Is the Elimination of Barriers Initiative (EBI)? A Federal initiative to reduce the stigma and discrimination associated with mental illnesses using tools such as public education and contact Barriers restrict access to treatment, employment, housing, and other opportunities. Main Goal of the EBI:  Main Goal of the EBI Achieve a society that promotes acceptance of all persons with mental illnesses Objectives of the EBI:  Objectives of the EBI Combat stigma and discrimination Reduce barriers to treatment Build public support for recovery Build public support for an array of accessible, quality community-based services EBI Pilot States:  EBI Pilot States California Florida Massachusetts North Carolina Ohio Pennsylvania Texas Wisconsin What Works to Reduce Stigma and Discrimination?:  What Works to Reduce Stigma and Discrimination? Personal contact with persons with mental illnesses Public Education Reward and Protest What Does EBI Bring to Florida?:  What Does EBI Bring to Florida? Materials targeting to specific audiences Expertise and technical assistance Communication support Strategic partnerships The Resource Center to Address Discrimination and Stigma (ADS Center) Opportunity to develop and test cutting-edge materials EBI Tools for Addressing Stigma and Discrimination:  EBI Tools for Addressing Stigma and Discrimination Public service announcements Drop-in articles Web sites: www.allmentalhealth.samhsa.gov www.nuestrasaludmental.samhsa.gov Posters Brochures Training materials and posters for businesses Speaker’s bureaus and other personal contact opportunities EBI Materials:  EBI Materials Print PSAs: Promote to local newspapers Place in newsletters Post on neighborhood bulletin boards Place in information kits Post in public libraries Use as fliers, grocery bag liners, handouts for presentations TV PSAs: Play during meetings, conferences, or presentations Loop in waiting rooms Promote to local television stations EBI Materials:  EBI Materials Radio PSAs: Adapt live read scripts for other languages/cultures Play during meetings, conferences, or presentations Promote to local radio stations Drop-in Articles: Place in your organization’s or company’s newsletter Promote to your local newspaper Place in information packets Display on bulletin boards How Can I Learn More About Resources in Florida?:  How Can I Learn More About Resources in Florida? If you or someone you know would like more information about mental health resources in your community, visit www.allmentalhealth.samhsa.gov or call 1-800-789-2647 The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) has an online resource: The National Mental Health Information Center, www.mentalhealth.samhsa.gov Florida’s Strategic Plan:  Florida’s Strategic Plan EBI website launched January 2004 Completion of State EBI Marketing Plans February 2004 Evaluation site visits February 2004 EBI Launch- Orlando May 22, 2004 PSA Release August, 2004 Site-specific technical assistance/ training delivery September 2004 Evaluation 2005 How Can I Learn More About the EBI in Florida ?:  How Can I Learn More About the EBI in Florida ? Please Contact the Florida Department of Children and Families - Mental Health Program Office Jackie Beck, MSW, (850) 921-5699 [email protected]

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