EttiquettePPT

Information about EttiquettePPT

Published on February 4, 2008

Author: Davide

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Etiquette A leadership training lesson from The Pennsylvania State University.:  Etiquette A leadership training lesson from The Pennsylvania State University. *This powerpoint should be used in conjunction with the Etiquette lesson plan found at http://leadership.cas.psu.edu/Training.html Effective Meetings: Overview:  Effective Meetings: Overview Introduction Lesson Objectives Lesson Content Reflection Questions References Introduction:  Introduction Leaders are often in public situations Important to display the utmost diplomacy and tact Portray a positive and professional image Interacting with different people and in different situations is key Learning some etiquette can help when navigating difficult situations Lesson Objectives:  Lesson Objectives At the end of the lesson, you will be able to: Understand some basic manner rules Describe the different codes of dress Understand the rules of communications etiquette including phone, cell phone, and e-mail Describe various rules for dining etiquette Etiquette:  Etiquette Leaders live in a fishbowl, with lives on display It is important to practice some simple rules of etiquette More than knowing which fork is for salad Showing that you care about others, how you treat them, and how you make them feel Some Basics to Remember:  Some Basics to Remember Open doors for others and allow them to enter first Hold the door open until those behind you can grab it Say “Thank you” to someone who holds a door for you Greet someone when the come to meetings, conferences, etc. If you are a guest, be pleasant and introduce yourself to people Regardless of location, pick up after yourself Wait your turn and do not interrupt others Some Basics to Remember:  Some Basics to Remember Be a good sport. Win graciously Lose MORE graciously Take compliments well. Say “thank you” Avoid putting yourself down or pointing out flaws When people do things differently, be respectful Attire:  Attire A key piece to positive image People to look to how leaders act, dress, and speak The way we dress sends a message about the way we feel about ourselves Select clothes with confidence and authority Clothes should easily allow movement and standing Clean, wrinkle, stain, and lint free Shoes should be polished and clean Attire List Provided by the University of Texas at Dallas:  Attire List Provided by the University of Texas at Dallas Dressy Casual Neatly pressed and clean slacks, skirts, or dresses Solid color t-shirts, mock turtleneck, polo shirt, collared or button down shirts/blouses Semi-Formal Men: neatly pressed dress pants, slacks, button shirts and ties (jackets are optional but preferred) Ladies: evening dress, dinner dress, some pant suits Attire List Provided by the University of Texas at Dallas:  Attire List Provided by the University of Texas at Dallas Formal Men: tuxedos, dark suits and ties Ladies: cocktail to floor length dresses (avoid sequins), nylons, dress shoes Black tie Men: black tuxedo coat, trousers with satin ribbon, cummerbund and bow tie Ladies: ball gowns Attire List Provided by the University of Texas at Dallas:  Attire List Provided by the University of Texas at Dallas Black tie optional Men: option of wearing a regular suit with a tie Ladies: cocktail gown or dinner dress. Long to full-length skirts are preferred White tie (the most formal category) Men: black tailcoat with matching trousers, a white pique’ tie, white pique’ single or double-breasted vest, and a wing-collar shirt with a stiff pique’ front Ladies: ball gown with a full skirt. Elbow-length gloves Attire List:  Attire List DO NOT WEAR category Tube/Halter tops and shirts Dresses with spaghetti straps Shorts, skirts or dresses that are not lower than your finger tips Ripped jeans Cut offs Attire with inappropriate messages/slogans/etc. Hats are never allowed in buildings Grooming:  Grooming Hair should be clean and in place Females: make up should be tastefully applied Less is more Wash your hands and groom your nails before attending an event Meeting People:  Meeting People Verbal and nonverbal behavior define social skills Signs of good etiquette and good manners: Effective handshakes Good eye contact Proper introductions Always pay careful attention to what others are saying Smile, be at ease, self-confident, composed Speak well of others (regardless of your true feelings) Look directly at a person when speaking and always use respectful words Meeting People:  Meeting People Respectful words include Ma’am Sir Yes, please No, thank you Yes, please, Mr. Jones No, thank you, Mrs Johnson Meeting People:  Meeting People Handshakes As important as the smile and tone of your voice Firm, with substance NOT a bone crusher, and not lifeless Two to three seconds is long enough Never shake hands with your left hand in your pocket Never reach across a table to shake hands with someone Meeting People:  Meeting People Introductions Always take initiative to introduce yourself When in doubt, introduce people (even if they already know each other) The youngest is always introduced to oldest, or lower rank is introduced to higher rank Group: “(Group name), this is Brandon Jones.” Individual: “Brandon, I would like for you to meet Emma Bean. Emma, this is Brandon Jones.” Meeting People:  Meeting People Always use titles in introductions and in general conversation ALWAYS use Mr. and Ms. Only use Mrs. if you are sure someone is married AND prefers that title Dr. is most appropriate if someone has a PhD, DVM, or MD When in doubt, err on the side of being too formal Communications:  Communications Effective communication is important to leaders Leaders may be called upon to Write letters Send e-mails Attend conference calls Do presentations Knowing the proper etiquette for e-mai, voice mail, and phone calls will aid in conducting yourself in a professional manner Communications: Cell Phones:  Communications: Cell Phones Public Cell Phone Etiquette, provided by Info World If you cannot move away from others (bus, theater, meeting, dinner table) you should not be using your cell phone If you use your phone, keep the ringer to a normal phone ring, not the latest Top 40 hit or a childhood favorite Turn your cell phone off during public performances Carry one electronic device at a time. Either use your cell phone or your PDA, but not both Do not ever use your cell phone while driving; pull over if you must use your cell phone when in the car Communications: Cell Phones:  Communications: Cell Phones Do not wear an earpiece or other attachment for you phone when in a business situation Use a normal speaking voice; do not scream into your cell phone. You do not need to have your cell phone everywhere Hospital, House of Worship, Classroom, etc. Show off your phone’s features in private, not in public Turn on your phone’s vibrate feature, or leave the ringer at a reasonably low volume when in a meeting, meal, or other public venue Communications: e-mail:  Communications: e-mail Good e-mail Etiquette, provided by Dynamoo.com Do find out if your place of business or organization has a policy about e-mail Do think about message content before you hit the send button Do send relevant messages to people; nobody likes junk mail Do be polite Do delete old messages when you hit the reply button Do use jokes and attempts at humor sparingly Do include a subject line and make it relevant to the message you are sending Communications:  Communications Do include information from previous e-mails if it is necessary to understand the current situation Do be patient with people not familiar with e-mail Do always sign your e-mails with your actual name Do pay attention to whether or not a message is sent to a whole list of people Do delete information that isn’t necessary Do tell people if you are sending an attachment, what the attachment is, and why they need it Do let people know if you are forwarding their message to someone else and, if appropriate, ask if you may do so Communications: e-mail:  Communications: e-mail Bad e-mail Etiquette, provided by Dynamoo.com Don’t reply to an e-mail message when angry Don’t copy a long message just to add a line or two of text, such as “I agree” DON’T TYPE IN CAPITALS AS THIS IS CONSIDERED SHOUTING! Don’t over use punctuation such as exclamation marks!!! Don’t send irrelevant messages, especially to mailing lists or newsgroups Don’t send large attachments without first checking with the recipient Don’t send chain letters Communications:  Communications Don’t send an e-mail without first proofreading Don’t conduct arguments in public, like on a mailing list Don’t make personal remarks about third parties Don’t send unsuitable e-mail or attachments Don’t use an over elaborate signature on your message Don’t mark things as urgent if they aren’t Don’t post your e-mail address on web sites and other public parts of the internet Communications: Telephones:  Communications: Telephones Use proper etiquette when using the phone for business Make an agenda for the call Speak slowly Be polite and friendly, and smile Reply to voice mail within 24 hours When leaving messages Start with your name, phone number, and the time and date of your call Speak slowly and clearly, and be brief Announce the level of importance (urgent, ASAP, etc.) End the message by repeating your name and number Communications: Telephones:  Communications: Telephones When speaking with a business for the first time Know who you need and ask for them directly For your records, write down the name of the person with whom you are speaking and the date and time you called Always introduce yourself If the person you are looking for is away, Ask when they will be available Tell when you will call back When you phone later, your call will be expected Dining Etiquette:  Dining Etiquette Leaders may be called upon to attend banquets, luncheons, or parties Good manners are important to leaving a favorable impression A few key tips can make the whole experience more enjoyable The individuals at the Career Center at Ball State University and at CuisineNet have provided the following information on dinner etiquette Dining Etiquette:  Dining Etiquette Let the host take the lead (i.e. when they unfold their napkin you do the same) Avoid foods that are sloppy or are hard to eat Be polite and courteous Be comfortable and relaxed Dining Etiquette:  Dining Etiquette Basic Table Manners Eat with a fork unless the food is meant to be eaten with fingers Don’t stuff your mouth full of food Chew with your mouth closed; this includes no talking with your mouth full Don’t make any rude comments about any food being served Always say thank you when served something If the meal is not buffet style, then wait until everyone is served before eating Dining Etiquette:  Dining Etiquette Eat slowly; don’t gobble up the food When eating rolls, break off a piece of bread before buttering Ask for far items to be passed to you; don’t reach over someone’s plate for something Don’t pick anything out of your teeth Always use a napkin (which should be on your lap when not in used) to dab your mouth When at eating at someone’s home or a guest of someone in a restaurant, always thank the host and tell them how delicious it was (even if it wasn’t) Dining Etiquette:  Dining Etiquette Napkin Etiquette Place the napkin on your lap Small luncheon napkins should be completely unfolded Large dinner napkins should be folded in half lengthwise Your napkin remains on your lap during the entire meal Place your napkin on your chair if you leave the table during dinner. This signals to your server that you will be returning Place your napkin neatly on the table to the right side of the plate. Do not refold the napkin, but do not leave it crumpled up, either. Dining Etiquette:  Dining Etiquette Proper passing Food dishes are passed from left to right It is ok to help yourself when asked to pass a dish of food, but do not take the last helping Among friends it is fine to be informal and use fingers to take a cookie from a plate In more formal settings, small tongs can be used to pick up the cookie Take only one of anything and then get seconds if there are any left Dining Etiquette:  Dining Etiquette Bread Tear off a bite-sized piece and then butter that piece If you are using your hands to eat the meal, then soaking up sauce while holding a piece of bun or tortilla is fine If you are dining with a fork, tear off a bite-sized piece of bread and place it onto the plate; Use the fork to retrieve the bread from the sauce or gravy Dining Etiquette:  Dining Etiquette What to Eat with Your Fingers Artichoke and Asparagus Bacon Bread and Cookies Corn on the Cob Deviled Eggs Hors d'Oeuvres, Canapés, Crudités Pickles and Olives Sandwiches Small fruits and berries on the stem Chips, French Fries, Fried Chicken, and Hamburgers Nuts Dining Etiquette:  Dining Etiquette Pasta Cut the strands to shorten slightly before twirling You don’t have to use the spoon (if one is provided) Twirl the pasta with a fork either by rolling it around in the spoon or just use the fork alone, keeping the fork in contact with the plate Slurping pasta is the only method that is never proper Reflection Questions:  Reflection Questions What are some ways you can put etiquette to use? Where might you use these tips? Have you ever done something on one of the “Do Not Do” lists? If so, how can you correct this error for next time? Did you find something that you do on one of the “Do” lists, but didn’t know it was an etiquette rule? Where have you done it? Describe a time where you might find yourself using these tips in the future. Why are they so important to learn right now? References:  References University of Texas at Dallas. (2005). Retrieved on September 15, 2006, from http://www.utdallas.edu/~aria/dance/etiquette.html#Clothing Info World. (2007). Retrieved on January 10, 2006, from http://www.infoworld.com/articles/op/xml/00/05/26/000526opwireless.html Dynamoo.com. (1997-2003). Retrieved on September 15, 2006, from http://www.dynamoo.com/technical/etiquette.htm Career Center at Ball State University. (2007). Retrieved on January 10, 2006, from http://www.bsu.edu/students/careers/students/interviewing/dining/ Cuisine Net. (1998). Retrieved on September 15, 2006, from http://www.cuisinenet.com/digest/custom/etiquette/manners_intro.shtml

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