Exemplification Overview

Information about Exemplification Overview

Published on July 13, 2013

Author: tccampa

Source: authorstream.com

Content

yellow-prominent: Exemplification Using Vivid Examples Click for next  Exemplification: Why We Use Examples Click for next  PowerPoint Presentation: Why We Use Examples To show a causal relationship ( caus al, from “cause”—not cas -u-al) Click for next  Why We Use Examples: Why We Use Examples To be more interesting and take the reader beyond a simple statement Click for next  Why We Use Examples: Why We Use Examples Help to explain or clarify Click for next  Why We Use Examples: Why We Use Examples To avoid unintended ambiguity Click for next  Why We Use Examples: Forms of Examples Click for next  PowerPoint Presentation: Specific names (Names = type of example) Mao Zedong Joseph Stalin Benito Mussolini Click for next  Examples of dictators Specific names (Names = type of example): Specific items (items = type of example) Examples of unappealing dinners Rat flambe Raw fish Insect sushi Click for next  Specific items (items = type of example): Specific items (items = type of example) Examples of popular products Click for next  Specific items (items = type of example): Specific places (places = type of example) Examples of unexplained stone structures Easter Island Carnac Stones, France Stonehenge Click for next  Specific places (places = type of example): Forms of Examples Anecdotes Personal observations “I couldn’t wait to start my first day of school. My brother was actually the one who was scared, and I will never forget how everyone began to see me as his protector…” Click for next  Forms of Examples: Forms of Examples Expert opinions (from outside sources, interviews) As a roller coaster engineer, I would be considered an expert on amusement ride safety. Click for next  Forms of Examples: Forms of Examples Facts Statistics Case studies via research This formula proves everything! Click for next  Forms of Examples: 5 Example Types Click for next  PowerPoint Presentation: Example Types: Personal Experience examples Typical-case examples Hypothetical examples Generalized examples Extended examples Click for next  Example Types:: Personal Experience examples Example Types Click for next  Personal Experience examples: Personal Experience Examples From your own life Lend personal authority In 2005, I climbed the Leaning Tower of Pisa, and while I was there, I saw… Click for next  Personal Experience Examples: 1. Personal Experience Examples Create drama/interest Help readers relate to information as they empathize with you While everyone else was looking at the ocean, I turned around and snapped an amazing picture of a… Click for next  1. Personal Experience Examples: 1. Personal experience Examples Last year, a man stopped me at Wal-Mart and asked if I would be willing to…. (You want to know more, don’t you?) Click for next  1. Personal experience Examples: Typical-case Examples Example Types Click for next  Typical-case Examples: 2. Typical-case Examples Objective in nature: can be especially convincing Must be recurring to be “ typical” A typical-case hurricane Click for next  2. Typical-case Examples: 2. Typical-case Examples About an actual event/situation, but you didn’t directly experience it. Source could be newspapers, magazines, television Watergate: a typical-case government scandal Click for next  2. Typical-case Examples: 2. Typical-case Examples “A typical school cafeteria meal contains 800 calories and 30 grams of fat.” Click for next  2. Typical-case Examples: 3. Hypothetical Examples Example Types Click for next  3. Hypothetical Examples: 3. Hypothetical Examples Speculative, but be sure it’s conceivable ( believable or possible ) “Imagine a traffic jam in which the pedestrians move faster than vehicles...” Click for next  3. Hypothetical Examples: 3. Hypothetical Examples Might ask the reader to imagine a scenario Sometimes used to evoke empathy “Imagine having no home to return to after school...” Click for next  3. Hypothetical Examples: 3. Hypothetical Examples “Imagine for a moment that cars could fly…” Click for next  3. Hypothetical Examples: 3. Hypothetical Examples “Hypothetically, if everyone reduced their water usage by 1 gallon per day…” Click for next  3. Hypothetical Examples: 4. Generalized Examples Example Types Click for next  4. Generalized Examples: 4. Generalized Examples Generalized examples reflect the typical and usual situations “Nearly everyone has experienced both the convenience and the frustration of public transportation…” Click for next  4. Generalized Examples: 4. Generalized Examples “ all of us , at one time or another, have been interrupted by the ringing of someone else’s cell phone. Click for next  4. Generalized Examples: 4. Generalized Examples “ when most people receive a compliment…” Click for next  4. Generalized Examples: 5. Extended examples Example Types Click for next  5. Extended examples: 5. Extended Examples As the name implies, these examples include many details and specifics Click for next  5. Extended Examples: 5. Extended Examples Can be an entire paragraph or even an entire essay must be significant to stand alone as the only example Cousin Billy’s trip to the swamp is a good extended example of how NOT to treat wildlife! Click for next  5. Extended Examples: 5. Extended Examples “ My neighbors’ last party was an excellent example of bizarre family behavior…” (several paragraphs would be used to describe the example) Click for next  5. Extended Examples: 5. Extended Examples “The Perez family is an example of how being thrifty can also mean having more…” Click for next  5. Extended Examples: What makes Exemplification effective ? Exemplification – using examples Click for next  What makes Exemplification effective? : Enough Examples To prove that most middle-aged adults are out of shape, you would need examples of many adults . These 2 alone are not enough! Click for next  Enough Examples: Use a Wide Range of Examples Relying on stereotypes or limited examples is not fair! Click for next  Use a Wide Range of Examples: Avoid the Obvious Examples of car brands are Ford, Chevrolet, and Toyota… Colors of cars are red, white, blue, and silver. Obvious! Obvious! Click for next  Avoid the Obvious: Use Transitions For example, For instance, First, second, third Next, in addition To illustrate, Click for next  Use Transitions: Be representative avoid oddball or one-in-a-million types of examples Priscilla lost 20 lbs in 2 weeks! This does not exemplify what MOST people experience Click for next  Be representative: End of presentation. Examples of weird costumes

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