Hypertension -pharmacological treatment

Information about Hypertension -pharmacological treatment

Published on August 1, 2014

Author: toufiqurrahman52

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Hypertension–Pharmacological Treatment: Hypertension–Pharmacological Treatment Dr. Md.Toufiqur Rahman MBBS, FCPS , MD, FACC , FESC, FRCPE , FSCAI, FAPSC, FAPSIC , FAHA, FCCP, FRCPG Associate Professor of Cardiology National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Sher -e- Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207 Consultant, Medinova , Malibagh branch Honorary Consultant, Apollo Hospitals, Dhaka and STS Life Care Centre, Dhanmondi [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] PowerPoint Presentation: [email protected] Summary: Summary Once hypertension develops, pharmacologic treatment is needed to reduce BP and prevent CVD outcomes. Clinical trial data indicate that lowering BP with antihypertensive drugs effectively reduces CVD outcomes, including stroke, CHD, CHF, and CV death, as well as total mortality. Outcome benefits have been seen particularly with antihypertensive regimens based on ACEIs, ARBs, CCBs, and diuretics (such as  chlorthalidone ).   Meta­analyses  of data from randomized controlled trials have not  shownsignificant  differences in total major CV  events between regimens based on ACEIs, ARBs, or CCBs, and  diuretics,with  traditional  beta­blockers  being less  effective. For outcomes other than CHF, differences in achieved SBP reduction have been shown in some analyses to be related to the extent of risk reduction, independent of treatment assignment.  Therefore, some would argue that, for hypertensive patients as a whole, reduction of BP (especially SBP) is possibly more important than choice of antihypertensive drug(s) for reducing CVD risk. However, this remains controversial. Clinical trials have shown that in most patients, two or more antihypertensive medications are required to achieve goal BP, namely <140/90 mm Hg in most; <130/80 mm Hg in those with diabetes, CKD, CAD, CAD equivalents, and  high­risk  patients, i.e., those with a Framingham risk score of ≥10%. Accordingly, initiation of therapy with two agents (in individual tablets or  fixed­dose  combination) should be started in those with BP >20/10 mm Hg above goal. [email protected] Summary: Summary JNC 7 guidelines recommend using  thiazide­type  diuretics as  first­line  treatment in most  hypertensives ,  and in combination with other drug classes where multiple drugs are required.  This differs from European guidelines, in which antihypertensive drug choices are left up to the health care provider. The American Heart Association (AHA) Scientific Statement on hypertension and CAD has emphasized ACEIs, ARBs, and CCBs as the most appropriate agents, with a diuretic.  The rationale for the preferred status of the diuretics such as  chlorthalidone  includes: 1) the favorable outcome trial data delineating their benefits, 2)  theirability  to enhance the antihypertensive efficacy of most other drug classes, and 3) their low  cost. Their biochemical adverse effects (i.e.,  hypokalemia , reduced insulin sensitivity) and diabetes are a concern, and may in the  longer­ term negate the  short­term  benefit seen in the clinical trials. A hypertensive patient may also have a  high­risk  condition (e.g., CAD, diabetes, CKD) that constitutes a compelling indication for use of other antihypertensive drug classes.  In that case, initial treatment should be dictated by the compelling indication, bearing in mind that BP control is paramount. Treatment guidelines  from JNC 7, as well as the AHA, American College of Cardiology, ADA, and the NKF concur on the  drug­class   choices for each compelling indication. [email protected] Summary: RAS agents have been shown to be beneficial in patients with CAD, diabetes, or CKD. In addition, beta­ blockers are indicated in established CAD, and CCBs can be used in patients with high CHD risk or diabetes based on outcomes data. Meta­analyses  have shown that treatment regimens based on ACEIs, ARBs, and CCBs are superior to  those based on  thiazide  diuretics or traditional  beta­blockers . The caveat is that most of these studies used hydrochlorothiazide as the diuretic and  atenolol  as the  beta­blocker .  Chlorthalidone , which is not a   thiazide  per se, has been shown to be effective, and is likely to supplant hydrochlorothiazide as the diuretic of choice. Newer  beta­blockers  ( carvedilol ,  metoprolol ,  bucindolol ,  nebivolol ), lower BP and are also effective in  improving outcomes in patients with impaired LV function. CVD is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in developed countries, and aggressive risk factor modification is needed to control this burgeoning public health problem. Tight BP control is  fundamental for primary and secondary prevention of CVD Summary [email protected] Thank You: Thank You [email protected]

Related presentations


Other presentations created by toufiqurrahman52

echo reporting basics
22. 07. 2014
0 views

echo reporting basics

cardio cerebral resuscitation
02. 08. 2014
0 views

cardio cerebral resuscitation

Cardiovascular system assessment
01. 08. 2014
0 views

Cardiovascular system assessment

Management of Hypertension
11. 08. 2014
0 views

Management of Hypertension

echo evaluation 4
18. 08. 2014
0 views

echo evaluation 4

Echocardiography evaluation  3
18. 08. 2014
0 views

Echocardiography evaluation 3