Inferring Main Ideas New

Information about Inferring Main Ideas New

Published on October 15, 2007

Author: Lindon

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Slide1:  Inferring the Main Idea Developed by: Professor Jean Van Meter Slide2:  During World War II, women of childbearing age had, on average, 2.5 children. But the 1950s saw an increase in the fertility rate. It edged up to over 3.3 children per woman in the first half of the decade and then peaked at 3.6 children in the decade’s last half. Fifteen years later, the fertility rate had dropped to the point where the average woman had 1.7 children. This trend has reversed in the past ten years, with fertility increasing to 2.0 children per woman of childbearing age in 1989. However, this apparent baby boomlet may be the result of baby-boom women having children. Topic? Slide3:  During World War II, women of childbearing age had, on average, 2.5 children. But the 1950s saw an increase in the fertility rate. It edged up to over 3.3 children per woman in the first half of the decade and then peaked at 3.6 children in the decade’s last half. Fifteen years later, the fertility rate had dropped to the point where the average woman had 1.7 children. This trend has reversed in the past ten years, with fertility increasing to 2.0 children per woman of childbearing age in 1989. However, this apparent baby boomlet may be the result of baby-boom women having children. fertility rate Did what? Topic ? Slide4:  During World War II, women of childbearing age had, on average, 2.5 children. But the 1950s saw an increase in the fertility rate. It edged up to over 3.3 children per woman in the first half of the decade and then peaked at 3.6 children in the decade’s last half. Fifteen years later, the fertility rate had dropped to the point where the average woman had 1.7 children. This trend has reversed in the past ten years, with fertility increasing to 2.0 children per woman of childbearing age in 1989. However, this apparent baby boomlet may be the result of baby-boom women having children. went up and down When? Slide5:  During World War II, women of childbearing age had, on average, 2.5 children. But the 1950s saw an increase in the fertility rate. It edged up to over 3.3 children per woman in the first half of the decade and then peaked at 3.6 children in the decade’s last half. Fifteen years later, the fertility rate had dropped to the point where the average woman had 1.7 children. This trend has reversed in the past ten years, with fertility increasing to 2.0 children per woman of childbearing age in 1989. However, this apparent baby boomlet may be the result of baby-boom women having children. went up and down When? Inferred Main Idea??? Slide6:  Since WWII, the fertility rate in the U.S. has gone up and down. Slide7:  Vitamin A helps prevent colds and other infections. A deficiency in vitamin A can produce eye diseases. Eggs, butter, and yellow vegetables all contain vitamin A. Vitamin C also helps prevent infections, and it is essential to healthy teeth. Oranges, lemons, tomatoes, and strawberries all contain this important vitamin. Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, helps keep bones and teeth strong. The lack of vitamin D can contribute to arthritis. Liver and eggs are the best sources of this vitamin. The vitamin B complex is also extremely important. It keeps the skin healthy and develops muscle tone. Vitamin B may even help reduce stress and tension. Green, leafy vegetables, milk, and grains help supply this important group of vitamins. Topic? Slide8:  Vitamin A helps prevent colds and other infections. A deficiency in vitamin A can produce eye diseases. Eggs, butter, and yellow vegetables all contain vitamin A. Vitamin C also helps prevent infections, and it is essential to healthy teeth. Oranges, lemons, tomatoes, and strawberries all contain this important vitamin. Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, helps keep bones and teeth strong. The lack of vitamin D can contribute to arthritis. Liver and eggs are the best sources of this vitamin. The vitamin B complex is also extremely important. It keeps the skin healthy and develops muscle tone. Vitamin B may even help reduce stress and tension. Green, leafy vegetables, milk, and grains help supply this important group of vitamins. vitamins What about them? Slide9:  Vitamin A helps prevent colds and other infections. A deficiency in vitamin A can produce eye diseases. Eggs, butter, and yellow vegetables all contain vitamin A. Vitamin C also helps prevent infections, and it is essential to healthy teeth. Oranges, lemons, tomatoes, and strawberries all contain this important vitamin. Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, helps keep bones and teeth strong. The lack of vitamin D can contribute to arthritis. Liver and eggs are the best sources of this vitamin. The vitamin B complex is also extremely important. It keeps the skin healthy and develops muscle tone. Vitamin B may even help reduce stress and tension. Green, leafy vegetables, milk, and grains help supply this important group of vitamins. keep you healthy Where do do we get vitamins? Slide10:  Vitamin A helps prevent colds and other infections. A deficiency in vitamin A can produce eye diseases. Eggs, butter, and yellow vegetables all contain vitamin A. Vitamin C also helps prevent infections, and it is essential to healthy teeth. Oranges, lemons, tomatoes, and strawberries all contain this important vitamin. Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, helps keep bones and teeth strong. The lack of vitamin D can contribute to arthritis. Liver and eggs are the best sources of this vitamin. The vitamin B complex is also extremely important. It keeps the skin healthy and develops muscle tone. Vitamin B may even help reduce stress and tension. Green, leafy vegetables, milk, and grains help supply this important group of vitamins. from food Inferred Main Idea??? Slide11:  Foods provide the vitamins necessary to stay healthy. Slide12:  Divorce is so commonplace nowadays that many people regard it as no more serious than a common cold. Instead of being treated as an emotional disaster, it is viewed as some sort of liberation, freeing both husband and wife to seek new partners and new disasters. Even the children are now said to prefer divorce to “a bad marriage.” I, myself, have never seen much evidence to support these indulgent views. Most of the divorced people I know have not fared much better with their second spouses than with their first, and in almost every case, the children have bitterly and helplessly resented the breakup. Topic? Slide13:  Divorce is so commonplace nowadays that many people regard it as no more serious than a common cold. Instead of being treated as an emotional disaster, it is viewed as some sort of liberation, freeing both husband and wife to seek new partners and new disasters. Even the children are now said to prefer divorce to “a bad marriage.” I, myself, have never seen much evidence to support these indulgent views. Most of the divorced people I know have not fared much better with their second spouses than with their first, and in almost every case, the children have bitterly and helplessly resented the breakup. divorce What about it? Slide14:  Divorce is so commonplace nowadays that many people regard it as no more serious than a common cold. Instead of being treated as an emotional disaster, it is viewed as some sort of liberation, freeing both husband and wife to seek new partners and new disasters. Even the children are now said to prefer divorce to “a bad marriage.” I, myself, have never seen much evidence to support these indulgent views. Most of the divorced people I know have not fared much better with their second spouses than with their first, and in almost every case, the children have bitterly and helplessly resented the breakup. Some say divorce is common and maybe even good. Others say it is not so good. Inferred Main Idea?? Slide15:  Although many people claim divorce is common and maybe good, others do not agree. Slide16:  Why is the universe expanding? According to the widely accepted “Big Bang” theory, all of matter now spread throughout the universe ( stars, planets, asteroids, etc.) was originally packed into a small volume. No one knows where the matter came from. However, according to the theory, temperatures and pressures were too high to imagine, and the mass of every cubic centimeter of this matter was over 90 billion kilograms. The theory further purports that the matter exploded, and debris was flung violently in all directions. This is where we are today: according to the theory, the universe is still expanding from that explosion. Topic? Slide17:  Why is the universe expanding? According to the widely accepted “Big Bang” theory, all of matter now spread throughout the universe ( stars, planets, asteroids, etc.) was originally packed into a small volume. No one knows where the matter came from. However, according to the theory, temperatures and pressures were too high to imagine, and the mass of every cubic centimeter of this matter was over 90 billion kilograms. The theory further purports that the matter exploded, and debris was flung violently in all directions. This is where we are today: according to the theory, the universe is still expanding from that explosion. Big Bang Theory What about it? Slide18:  Why is the universe expanding? According to the widely accepted “Big Bang” theory, all of matter now spread throughout the universe ( stars, planets, asteroids, etc.) was originally packed into a small volume. No one knows where the matter came from. However, according to the theory, temperatures and pressures were too high to imagine, and the mass of every cubic centimeter of this matter was over 90 billion kilograms. The theory further purports that the matter exploded, and debris was flung violently in all directions. This is where we are today: according to the theory, the universe is still expanding from that explosion. explains why the universe is expanding Who says? Slide19:  Why is the universe expanding? According to the widely accepted “Big Bang” theory, all of matter now spread throughout the universe ( stars, planets, asteroids, etc.) was originally packed into a small volume. No one knows where the matter came from. However, according to the theory, temperatures and pressures were too high to imagine, and the mass of every cubic centimeter of this matter was over 90 billion kilograms. The theory further purports that the matter exploded, and debris was flung violently in all directions. This is where we are today: according to the theory, the universe is still expanding from that explosion. most people Inferred Main Idea??? Slide20:  Most people believe the Big Bang theory explains why the universe seems to be expanding. Slide21:  In 1928, Dr. Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of penicillin, was a medical bacteriologist at St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London. While on duty, he noticed that a staphylococcus* culture he was cultivating had been contaminated by mold. He noticed, too, that in the area around the mold, bacteria were dissolving. Fleming isolated the mold and discovered that substances within it -substances he called penicillin - were inhibiting the bacteria’s growth. A cautious medical detective, Fleming reported in 1928 that penicillin “appears to have some advantages over the well-known chemical antiseptics.” It wasn’t until 1940 that additional research proved just how effective penicillin could be in the war against bacteria. In 1945, Fleming was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for his discovery of penicillin. * staphylococcus: a type of bacteria Topic? Slide22:  In 1928, Dr. Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of penicillin, was a medical bacteriologist at St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London. While on duty, he noticed that a staphylococcus* culture he was cultivating had been contaminated by mold. He noticed, too, that in the area around the mold, bacteria were dissolving. Fleming isolated the mold and discovered that substances within it -substances he called penicillin - were inhibiting the bacteria’s growth. A cautious medical detective, Fleming reported in 1928 that penicillin “appears to have some advantages over the well-known chemical antiseptics.” It wasn’t until 1940 that additional research proved just how effective penicillin could be in the war against bacteria. In 1945, Fleming was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for his discovery of penicillin. * staphylococcus: a type of bacteria the discovery of penicillin What about it? Slide23:  In 1928, Dr. Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of penicillin, was a medical bacteriologist at St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London. While on duty, he noticed that a staphylococcus* culture he was cultivating had been contaminated by mold. He noticed, too, that in the area around the mold, bacteria were dissolving. Fleming isolated the mold and discovered that substances within it -substances he called penicillin - were inhibiting the bacteria’s growth. A cautious medical detective, Fleming reported in 1928 that penicillin “appears to have some advantages over the well-known chemical antiseptics.” It wasn’t until 1940 that additional research proved just how effective penicillin could be in the war against bacteria. In 1945, Fleming was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for his discovery of penicillin. * staphylococcus: a type of bacteria When? happened by chance, not by deliberate research Slide24:  In 1928, Dr. Alexander Fleming, the discoverer of penicillin, was a medical bacteriologist at St. Mary’s Hospital Medical School in London. While on duty, he noticed that a staphylococcus* culture he was cultivating had been contaminated by mold. He noticed, too, that in the area around the mold, bacteria were dissolving. Fleming isolated the mold and discovered that substances within it -substances he called penicillin - were inhibiting the bacteria’s growth. A cautious medical detective, Fleming reported in 1928 that penicillin “appears to have some advantages over the well-known chemical antiseptics.” It wasn’t until 1940 that additional research proved just how effective penicillin could be in the war against bacteria. In 1945, Fleming was awarded the Nobel Prize in medicine for his discovery of penicillin. * staphylococcus: a type of bacteria Inferred Main Idea??? Slide25:  In 1928, Dr. Alexander Fleming inadvertently discovered penicillin. Slide26:  Nowadays, Bill Gates, the CEO of the computer company Microsoft, is pretty much considered to be a genius. Everything he puts his hands to seems to turn a profit. But it wasn’t always so. In the mid eighties, when Windows first came on the market, it was thought to be a dud - too flawed to be useful. But the determined Gates would not give up on it. Instead, he brought in Neil Konzen, a computer whiz barely out of his teens. In less than six months, Konzen rewrote the entire Windows program. When the new revised version of Windows 3.0 came on the market, it was immediately successful. Thanks to Konzen’s efforts and Microsoft’s smart marketing campaign, computer stores could barely keep Windows on their shelves. Topic? Slide27:  Nowadays, Bill Gates, the CEO of the computer company Microsoft, is pretty much considered to be a genius. Everything he puts his hands to seems to turn a profit. But it wasn’t always so. In the mid eighties, when Windows first came on the market, it was thought to be a dud - too flawed to be useful. But the determined Gates would not give up on it. Instead, he brought in Neil Konzen, a computer whiz barely out of his teens. In less than six months, Konzen rewrote the entire Windows program. When the new revised version of Windows 3.0 came on the market, it was immediately successful. Thanks to Konzen’s efforts and Microsoft’s smart marketing campaign, computer stores could barely keep Windows on their shelves. Microsoft Windows program What about it? Slide28:  Nowadays, Bill Gates, the CEO of the computer company Microsoft, is pretty much considered to be a genius. Everything he puts his hands to seems to turn a profit. But it wasn’t always so. In the mid eighties, when Windows first came on the market, it was thought to be a dud - too flawed to be useful. But the determined Gates would not give up on it. Instead, he brought in Neil Konzen, a computer whiz barely out of his teens. In less than six months, Konzen rewrote the entire Windows program. When the new revised version of Windows 3.0 came on the market, it was immediately successful. Thanks to Konzen’s efforts and Microsoft’s smart marketing campaign, computer stores could barely keep Windows on their shelves. took a while to be successful Inferred Main Idea??? Slide29:  Windows, by Bill Gates, was not an immediate success.

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