Introduction Why Study Greek Audio

Information about Introduction Why Study Greek Audio

Published on August 1, 2014

Author: dmmay150

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Learning Greek: The Adventure Begins Learning Greek You Would Think . . . : You Would Think . . . Martin Luther on Greek: Martin Luther on Greek “For the devil smelled a rat and perceived that if the languages [Greek and Hebrew] were revived a hole would be knocked in his kingdom which he could not easily stop up again.” Huldrych Zwingli on Greek: Huldrych Zwingli on Greek “I have firmly decided to study Greek; nobody except God can prevent it. It is not a matter of personal ambition but one of understanding the most Sacred Writings.” N. T. Wright on Greek: N. T. Wright on Greek “Trying to study the Bible without knowing the original languages is like trying to play Beethoven on a mouth organ. It’s just not going to be huge . . . You may get something of the tune, but it won’t be what the guy actually had in mind.” Helen Barrett Montgomery on Greek: Helen Barrett Montgomery on Greek One translates the Greek New Testament “to try to make it plain” for “young people, Sunday-School teachers, and foreigners.” Translator of the Centenary Translation Learning Greek?: Learning Greek? Romans 8:28: Romans 8:28 We know that God works all things together for good for the ones who love God, for those who are called according to his purpose . (CEB) We know that all things work together for good for those who love God, who are called according to his purpose. (NRSV) And in everything, as we know, he [Holy Spirit] co-operates for good with those who love God and are called according to his purpose. (REB) Electronic Resources: Electronic Resources Tyndale House Project: Tyndale House Project Scripture Tools for Every Person STEP http://www.stepbible.org / Approaches: Approaches Communicative Language Vs. Grammatical-Translation Terminology for Analysis: Terminology for Analysis The Study of Koine Greek: The Study of Koine Greek όπου πλείων κόπος πολύ κέρδος Ignatius to Polycarp (AD 108) “Where [there is] much toil, [there is] much gain.” “No pain, no gain.”

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