lecture5

Information about lecture5

Published on November 28, 2007

Author: Haggrid

Source: authorstream.com

Content

5. Massive black holes in galactic nuclei Frontiers of Astronomy Workshop/School Bibliotheca Alexandrina March-April 2006:  5. Massive black holes in galactic nuclei Frontiers of Astronomy Workshop/School Bibliotheca Alexandrina March-April 2006 Active galactic nuclei:  Active galactic nuclei ~ 1% of galaxies contain a bright, unresolved, central nucleus that emits non-stellar radiation there is a large zoo of AGNs: radio galaxies, Seyfert galaxies (type 1, type 2), BL Lacs, emission-line galaxies, quasars (QSOs), optically violent variables, blazars, etc. quasars or QSOs are the most luminous AGNs, ~1046 erg/sec or 1013 L, or 100–1000 times typical galaxy luminosity Slide3:  Croom et al. (2004) 1013 L increasing redshift galaxies 2dF quasar redshift survey Active galactic nuclei:  Active galactic nuclei ~ 1% of galaxies contain a bright, unresolved, central nucleus that emits non-stellar radiation there is a large zoo of AGNs: radio galaxies, Seyfert galaxies (type 1, type 2), BL Lacs, emission-line galaxies, quasars (QSOs), optically violent variables, blazars, etc. quasars or QSOs are the most luminous AGNs, ~1046 erg/sec, or 1013 L, or 100–1000 times typical galaxy luminosity QSOs are usually bright enough to hide host galaxy at ground-based resolution Active galactic nuclei:  Active galactic nuclei ~ 1% of galaxies contain a bright, unresolved, central nucleus that emits non-stellar radiation there is a large zoo of AGNs: radio galaxies, Seyfert galaxies (type 1, type 2), BL Lacs, emission-line galaxies, quasars (QSOs), optically violent variables, blazars, etc. quasars or QSOs are the most luminous AGNs, ~1046 erg/sec, or 1013 L, or 100–1000 times typical galaxy luminosity QSOs are usually bright enough to hide host galaxy at ground-based resolution bright QSOs are concentrated at redshifts 2–3 Slide7:  Sloan Digital Sky Survey Richards et al. (2006) Active galactic nuclei:  Active galactic nuclei ~ 1% of galaxies contain a bright, unresolved, central nucleus that emits non-stellar radiation there is a large zoo of AGN: radio galaxies, Seyfert galaxies (type 1, type 2), BL Lacs, emission-line galaxies, quasars (QSOs), optically violent variables, blazars, etc. quasars or QSOs are the most luminous AGNs, ~1046 erg/sec, or 1013 L, or 100–1000 times typical galaxy luminosity QSOs are usually bright enough to hide host galaxy at ground-based resolution QSOs are concentrated at redshifts 2–3 most of the X-ray background is due to obscured AGN at smaller redshift (z  0.7) and lower luminosity Slide9:  Cowie et al. (2003) Ueda et al. (2003) Ueda et al. (2003) faint bright Active galactic nuclei:  Active galactic nuclei ~ 1% of galaxies contain a bright, unresolved, central nucleus that emits non-stellar radiation there is a large zoo of AGN: radio galaxies, Seyfert galaxies (type 1, type 2), BL Lacs, emission-line galaxies, quasars (QSOs), optically violent variables, blazars, etc. quasars or QSOs are the most luminous AGNs, ~1046 erg/sec, or 1013 L, or 100–1000 times typical galaxy luminosity QSOs are usually bright enough to hide host galaxy at ground-based resolution QSOs are concentrated at redshifts 2–3 most of the X-ray background is due to obscured AGN at smaller redshift and lower luminosity the power source for AGNs is accretion onto a black hole (Salpeter 1964; Lynden-Bell 1969) Black holes as the power source for AGN:  Black holes as the power source for AGN directional stability of radio jets maintained for 1 Myr or more Slide12:  Bridle et al. (1994) Black holes as the power source for AGN:  Black holes as the power source for AGN directional stability of radio jets maintained for 1 Myr or more relativistic velocities in radio jets Black holes as the power source for AGN:  Black holes as the power source for AGN directional stability of radio jets maintained for 1 Myr or more relativistic velocities in radio jets rapid time variability: flickering in BL Lac objects on timescales down to 30 s X-ray flare in PKS 0558-504 on timescale 200 s X-ray flares common in Seyfert galaxies on timescale of hours For comparison, Schwarzschild radius RSch= 2.9 1013 M8 cm, M8=M/108 M minimum variability timescale is RSch/c=1000 M8 s Black holes as the power source for AGN:  Black holes as the power source for AGN directional stability of radio jets maintained for 1 Myr or more relativistic velocities in radio jets rapid time variability iron emission line Slide16:  Shih, Iwasawa & Fabian (2002) Seyfert galaxy MCG-6-30-15 relativistically broadened and redshifted iron K a line model fit to inner and outer accretion disk radii, disk inclination, total line flux, power-law radial emissivity distribution required radius range is ~1-10 rSch rest-frame energy Black holes as the power source for AGN:  Black holes as the power source for AGN directional stability of radio jets maintained for 1 Myr or more relativistic velocities in radio jets rapid time variability efficiency Burning a mass DM produces energy DE with efficiency  < 0.008 for nuclear reactions  < 10-4 for supernovae (excluding neutrinos)  = 0.057 for accretion onto a non-rotating (Schwarzschild) black hole  = 0.3 for accretion onto a Kerr black hole in equilibrium spin state  = 0.423 for accretion onto a maximally rotating black hole Black holes as the power source for AGN:  Black holes as the power source for AGN directional stability of radio jets maintained for 1 Myr or more relativistic velocities in radio jets rapid time variability efficiency most other plausible sources eventually turn into black holes anyway, and the black holes provide more efficient engines than their precursors Slide19:  Rees (1984) Black holes as the power source for AGN:  Black holes as the power source for AGN if black holes are the power source for quasars the present comoving number density of quasars is much less than the density at earlier epochs quasars are found in the centers of galaxies then many nearby galaxies must contain black holes at their centers Lynden-Bell (1969) “Galactic nuclei as collapsed old quasars” “…it seems probable that a dead quasar-like object inhabits the Local Group of galaxies and we must expect many nearer than the Virgo cluster” Massive black holes in nearby galaxies:  Massive black holes in nearby galaxies the detections are of massive dark objects (105 - 106 rSch) but There are no plausible candidates other than black holes Black holes are needed anyway to power AGN 40 nearby galaxies have measured black-hole masses in the literature: 26 from stellar kinematics 10 from gas kinematics 3 from maser kinematics Milky Way data and models have varying quality The Milky Way Galaxy:  The Milky Way Galaxy center is believed to be marked by radio source Sgr A* (+) probes distances as small as 0.01 pc ~10 light days ~31016 cm ~5104 Schwarzschild radii highest spatial resolution of any galactic center  strongest constraints on alternatives to black holes orbits  gravitational potential Genzel et al. (2003) The Milky Way Galaxy:  Genzel et al. (2000) The Milky Way Galaxy P = pressure = density P  2    = number density  = velocity dispersion gas stars The Milky Way Galaxy:  The Milky Way Galaxy Schodel et al. (2002) Ghez et al. (2003) P = 15.8 ± 0.8 yr e = 0.874 ± 0.008 a = 125.6 ± 5.5 milliarcsec = 1000 ± 40 AU q = a(1-e) = 125 AU The Milky Way Galaxy:  The Milky Way Galaxy Genzel et al. (2000) central dark mass M=(1.8±0.4)×106 M from proper motions and velocities (Chakrabarty & Saha 2001) M=(4.1±0.6)×106 M from orbit of S2 (Ghez et al. 2003) or M=(3.3±0.7)×106 M (Schoedel et al. 2003) no sign of extended mass distribution to 100 AU R0=7.9±0.4 kpc (Eisenhauer et al. 2003) Genzel et al. (2000) S2 NGC 4258:  NGC 4258 high-velocity maser emission from disk shows Keplerian rotation at r~0.2 pc M=(3.9±0.1)×107 M disk mass < 10% of black-hole mass masers at systemic velocity show proper motion 31.5±1 mas/yr and acceleration 9.3±0.3 km/s/yr proper motion and acceleration yield independent distance estimates of 7.1±0.2 Mpc and 7.2±0.2 Mpc Miyoshi et al. (1995), Herrnstein et al. (1999) Black hole detection by stellar kinematics :  Black hole detection by stellar kinematics black hole is guaranteed to be at the center of the galaxy (orbits decay by dynamical friction) photometry gives surface-brightness distribution of stars on the sky I(x,y) spectroscopy gives mean velocity <v> (Doppler shift of spectral lines) rms velocity dispersion along the line of sight  (smoothing of spectral lines) characteristic sphere of influence radius GMBH/2 is small combine Hubble observations (high resolution, expensive, small field of view) with ground-based observations Black hole detection by stellar kinematics:  Black hole detection by stellar kinematics advantages: no non-gravitational forces on stars can be applied to systems with no gas, dust, young star formation, M/L gradients disadvantages: no guarantee that velocity distribution is isotropic doesn’t work well for high-luminosity galaxies complicated dynamical modeling M31 M32 Slide29:  NGC 5845 Gebhardt et al. (2003) “nukers” black = major axis blue = minor axis red = intermediate axis radius in arcsec Orbit-based axisymmetric dynamical models:  Orbit-based axisymmetric dynamical models photometry  surface brightness I(x,y) assume inclination, assume emissivity constant on spheroids  emissivity j(R,z) assume mass-to-light ratio independent of position  density (R,z)=(M/L)j(R,z) solve Poisson’s equation 2=4G add potential due to black hole, GM/r divide phase space into a grid of cells, j=1,…,N numerically integrate orbits in the potential  from i=1,…,M different initial conditions and compute fij, the fraction of time orbit i spends in cell j find weights wi for each orbit i such that we reproduce surface brightness I(x,y), <v>, and  at each position choose M, M/L, inclination to minimize 2 problem is underconstrained so find maximum-entropy solution M32:  M32 data from van der Marel et al. (1998) their black-hole mass is (3.4±0.7)×106 M Nuker analysis of their data with our programs yields very similar result NGC 4258:  NGC 4258 Miyoshi et al. (1995) Siopis et al. (2005) HST ground Slide33:  red: base model black: alternate models Siopis et al. (2005) base models agree within 15%; stellar-dynamical mass is lower than maser mass The nucleus of M31:  Hubble Space Telescope 3”x3” Lauer et al. AJ 1998 3 pc The nucleus of M31 Why M31 is important:  Why M31 is important large angular size of sphere of influence GMBH/2: 30-40 times as massive as Milky Way black hole, large enough to produce a luminous AGN little or no gas, dust, recent star formation short dynamical time L/v ~ 1 pc/100 km/s ~ 104 yr so well-mixed Slide36:  Light, Danielson & Schwarzschild (1974) “A puzzling aspect of the high-resolution images is the offset of the peak brightness with respect to the outer portions of the nucleus...if no significant dust is present, the observed asymmetry is an intrinsic property of the nucleus which will probably require a dynamical explanation.” Slide37:  P2 P1 N E Stratoscope Hubble Space Telescope Slide38:  bulge center (P2) faint component (P2) is at the bulge center P2 is cuspy P2 has a compact blue component at its center (P3) bright component P1 is smooth total luminosity 6×106 L (r~0.5 pc) and is cuspy Lauer et al. (1998) P1 A binary stellar system?:  A binary stellar system? P1 and P2 have the same colours, except for the compact source P3 isophotes cannot be decomposed into superposition of two elliptical stellar systems  P1 and P2 must be in close proximity and are not simply projected onto the same position orbital period only 50,000 yr and inspiral time due to dynamical friction from the bulge is ~ 108 (106 M/M) yr << age Dust?:  Dust? colours of P1 and P2 are the same double structure is still present in near-infrared; no evidence of colour gradient Corbin et al. (2001) Slide41:  Huygens (1659) M31:  M31 0.5” = 1.6 pc the double nucleus is probably a thick eccentric disk of stars orbiting a black hole (Tremaine 1995) black hole is at P2; P1 is apocenter region of disk Peiris & Tremaine (2003) The eccentric-disk model:  The eccentric-disk model nucleus consists of a single massive black hole at P2, surrounded by a disk of stars stars in disk are on eccentric, nearly Keplerian orbits which are aligned so that apocenters point in the same direction P1 is the portion of the disk close to apocenter; stars move slowly near apocenter so most of them are found in this region at any given time black hole dominates gravitational potential so orbits are approximately closed best-fit black-hole mass 1108M Correctly explains: rotation curve and dispersion profile why P2 is at the center of the bulge (the black hole has most of the mass) why colours of P1 and P2 are the same, and different from the bulge (they’re the same stars) why P2 is cuspy but P1 is smooth (stars are bound to P2 but not to P1) Slide44:  rotation curve velocity dispersion Slide45:  Jacobs & Sellwood (2001) The blue star cluster (P3):  The blue star cluster (P3) STIS spectroscopy by Bender, Kormendy, Bower, Green, Thomas and STIS Instrument Team (2005) Slide47:  on blue nucleus on background blue nucleus The blue source P3 at the center of P2 is a cluster of A-stars with age ~ 200 Myr, mass about 5000 Msun, and velocity dispersion s = 960 ± 106 km/s Bender et al. (2005) Slide48:  300 nm - eccentric disc PSF convolved P3 model P3’s flattening is high and consistent with a disk seen at the same inclination as the larger P1+P2 eccentric disk: inclination ~ 55o Modeling photometry and kinematics of P3, continued… Bender et al. (2005) Slide49:  P3: observed kinematics vs thin disc model blue nucleus P3 in M31 is a stellar disc in Keplerian rotation around a black hole The best fit is obtained for a point mass, i.e. a black hole of mass: MBH ~ (1.1 – 2.5) x 108 M A mass sphere of radius 0.03”=0.1 pc is 1-sigma off from the point-mass solution the P3 stellar population is dominated by A-type stars (why so young?) mass in P3 is so compact that alternatives to a black hole are ruled out mass obtained from P3 is consistent with mass obtained from modeling P1 and P2, 1108 M Bender et al. (2005) The Nuker sample:  The Nuker sample 12 galaxies (10 ellipticals, 2 S0’s) all have: HST spectroscopy using STIS (10) or FOS (2) HST photometry ground-based photometry and spectroscopy at larger radii orbit-based axisymmetric dynamical models that fit the line-of-sight velocity distribution parameters are inclination, M/L of stars, black-hole mass Gebhardt et al. (2002) Slide51:  Gebhardt et al. (2002) The mass-luminosity relation:  The mass-luminosity relation • maser kinematics • gas kinematics • stellar kinematics (Nukers) ° stellar kinematics (others) 31 galaxies with most reliable masses M~La, a=1.050.17 intrinsic dispersion in M of 0.5 dex or smaller correlation is with luminosity of hot component (ellipticals, spiral bulges) Kormendy (1993) Tremaine et al. (2002) The mass-velocity dispersion relation:  The mass-velocity dispersion relation • maser kinematics • gas kinematics • stellar kinematics (Nukers) ° stellar kinematics (others) M~b, b=4.0±0.3 intrinsic dispersion in log M of < 0.3 Gebhardt et al. (2000), Ferrarese & Merritt (2000) Tremaine et al. (2002) The mass-velocity dispersion relation:  The mass-velocity dispersion relation no evidence of systematic differences between different methods no evidence of differences between ellipticals and spiral bulges consistent with masses of Seyfert nuclei determined by reverberation mapping (Gebhardt et al. 2000) only well-determined between 130 and 300 km/s but this includes L* galaxies Tremaine et al. (2002) Slide56:  bolometric luminosity The Soltan number:  The Soltan number Assuming =0.1 and using X-ray/optical surveys of AGN, (AGN)  2  105 M/Mpc3 (Cowie et al. 2003) (AGN)  (4 – 5)  105 M/Mpc3 (Fabian 2003) (AGN)  (5 – 10)  105 M/Mpc3 (Marconi et al. 2003) Current estimates of the Kormendy number are (local)  (2 - 5)  105 M/Mpc3 which are roughly consistent if   0.1 – 0.3 (range for thin-disk accretion onto Schwarzschild and Kerr black holes) Summary – what we know:  Summary – what we know there is now strong evidence for massive dark objects in 20-30 nearby galaxies. Mass range 106-109 M there is strong circumstantial evidence that the massive dark objects are black holes M  s4 with scatter of 0.2-0.3 in log local black hole mass density is consistent with expected density of ash from QSOs if   0.1 - 0.3 (!) obscured or dark accretion cannot be important for luminous QSOs Summary – what we don’t know:  Summary – what we don’t know what is the high-mass and low-mass end of the black hole mass function? do black holes merge efficiently when galaxies merge or are there binary black holes or wandering black holes in galaxy halos? why is black-hole mass so tightly correlated with the galaxy properties? what is the event rate of gravitational-wave bursts that will be detected by LISA (estimates range from 0.1/yr to 100/yr)? where are the former hosts of the brightest QSOs?

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