Low-level traffic lights set to improve cyclist safety

Information about Low-level traffic lights set to improve cyclist safety

Published on July 26, 2014

Author: sophiaben2

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Low-level traffic lights set to improve cyclist safety in London Low-level traffic lights, which could cut personal injury claims involving cyclists, will be installed across London in the immediate future. The first low-level traffic lights will be installed by Transport for London (TfL) at the Bow Roundabout, with the Department for Transport working alongside TfL to have these lights installed at a further 11 sites. This will potentially reduce the risk of cyclist personal injury claims at the following junctions: Pancras Road and Euston Road Upper Thames Street and Queen Street Place Field way Crescent and Madras Place and Holloway Road Colebrooke Row and City Road Goswell Road and Owen Street Royal Mint Street and Dock Street and Cable Street Narbonne Avenue and Clapham Common Southside Cedars Avenue and Clapham Common Northside Elliots Row, Princess Street and St George's Road Ontario Street, Princes Street and London Road Cannon Street Road and Cable Street Surveys indicate that over 80% of cyclists prefer low-level signals, which repeat main traffic light signals at a cyclist's eye level. These improve the signals received by cyclists to ensure they have all the information needed to act safely at junctions. The government is now researching whether or not these traffic signals should be used to give cyclists an "early start". Schemes and initiatives that should reduce the number of cyclist personal injury compensation claims have been taking place in London for many years, with Transport for London and Mayor of London Boris Johnson currently also trailing bus stop bypass and roundabout design and examining a 'Quietway' cycle network through low-traffic areas and back streets. Transport Minister Stephen Hammond said that the government welcomes innovative transport designs from local authorities as part of its effort to improve cyclist safety. : Low-level traffic lights set to improve cyclist safety in London Low-level traffic lights, which could cut personal injury claims involving cyclists, will be installed across London in the immediate future. The first low-level traffic lights will be installed by Transport for London ( TfL ) at the Bow Roundabout, with the Department for Transport working alongside TfL to have these lights installed at a further 11 sites . This will potentially reduce the risk of cyclist personal injury claims at the following junctions : Pancras Road and Euston Road Upper Thames Street and Queen Street Place Field way Crescent and Madras Place and Holloway Road Colebrooke Row and City Road Goswell Road and Owen Street Royal Mint Street and Dock Street and Cable Street Narbonne Avenue and Clapham Common Southside Cedars Avenue and Clapham Common Northside Elliots Row, Princess Street and St George's Road Ontario Street, Princes Street and London Road Cannon Street Road and Cable Street Surveys indicate that over 80% of cyclists prefer low-level signals, which repeat main traffic light signals at a cyclist's eye level. These improve the signals received by cyclists to ensure they have all the information needed to act safely at junctions. The government is now researching whether or not these traffic signals should be used to give cyclists an "early start ". Schemes and initiatives that should reduce the number of cyclist personal injury compensation claims have been taking place in London for many years, with Transport for London and Mayor of London Boris Johnson currently also trailing bus stop bypass and roundabout design and examining a ' Quietway ' cycle network through low-traffic areas and back streets . Transport Minister Stephen Hammond said that the government welcomes innovative transport designs from local authorities as part of its effort to improve cyclist safety. Ministers have worked alongside transport authorities to improve cyclist infrastructure, he added, noting that there is "always more" that can be done. Boris Johnson said the low-level traffic lights are "very good news" for the capital's cyclists, forming a "key element" of the government's vision for cyclists in the city. TfL Managing Director of Surface Transport Leon Daniels said the new cyclist traffic lights should be installed over January 2014, and if they prove to be successful, further trials will take place across the city over the year. Bow Roundabout already has "innovative traffic signals", Mr Daniels said, adding that the low-level lights will be a "further improvement" to these. Other initiatives that could reduce personal injury claims involving cyclists London is set to see in the near future include 'two-turn' junctions, which allow cyclists to take right turns without having to cut across other vehicle traffic. Instead, cyclists will turn left and then go straight ahead when taking right turns. This junction design is used to deliver cyclist safety in many other European cities. Although cyclist deaths in London have received a lot of press attention recently, London is actually becoming a safer city to cycle in; the number of people cycling regularly has soared recently, but this has not been matched by a proportionate increase in the number of cyclist deaths and serious injuries. Carol Smith works with cash advance solicitors and also she is keenly interested in the effects of head trauma and similar trauma. http://www.cashadvancesolicitors.co.uk/ : Ministers have worked alongside transport authorities to improve cyclist infrastructure, he added, noting that there is "always more" that can be done. Boris Johnson said the low-level traffic lights are "very good news" for the capital's cyclists, forming a "key element" of the government's vision for cyclists in the city. TfL Managing Director of Surface Transport Leon Daniels said the new cyclist traffic lights should be installed over January 2014, and if they prove to be successful, further trials will take place across the city over the year. Bow Roundabout already has "innovative traffic signals", Mr Daniels said, adding that the low-level lights will be a "further improvement" to these. Other initiatives that could reduce personal injury claims involving cyclists London is set to see in the near future include 'two-turn' junctions, which allow cyclists to take right turns without having to cut across other vehicle traffic. Instead, cyclists will turn left and then go straight ahead when taking right turns. This junction design is used to deliver cyclist safety in many other European cities. Although cyclist deaths in London have received a lot of press attention recently, London is actually becoming a safer city to cycle in; the number of people cycling regularly has soared recently, but this has not been matched by a proportionate increase in the number of cyclist deaths and serious injuries. Carol Smith works with cash advance solicitors and also she is keenly interested in the effects of head trauma and similar trauma. http://www.cashadvancesolicitors.co.uk/

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