Mapping key dimensions of industrial relations - 2016

Information about Mapping key dimensions of industrial relations - 2016

Published on June 8, 2016

Author: christianwelz

Source: slideshare.net

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1. Mapping Key Dimensions of Industrial Relations Dr. Christian Welz University of Arkansas, Dublin, 08 June 2016

2. 2 Varieties of IR Research questions Key dimensions Views of stakeholders IR cluster perspective Indicators 2 3 4 6 5 1

3. 3 Varieties of IR1 2 3 4 6 5

4. Definition of industrial relations industrial relations (IR) – “the focal point of the field (…) is the employee-employer relationship.” (US Social Science Research Council 1928) – “(…) the consecrated euphemism for the permanent conflict, now acute, now subdued, between capital and labour.”(Miliband,1969, 80, cited by Blyton/Turnbull, 2004, 9) – “The central concern of IR is the collective regulation (governance) of work and employment.” (Sisson 2010)

5. Industrial relations regimes • Liberal market vs. coordinated market economies – Peter Hall and David A. Soskice, 2001, Varieties of Capitalism: the institutional foundations of comparative advantage, Oxford University Press.

6. Liberal Msarket Economies • UK – corporate governance: shareholder dominated; performance represented by current earnings and share prices – employee relations: short term, market relations between employee and employer; top management has unilateral control of the firm – industrial relations: employer organisations and unions relatively weak; decentralised wage setting; insecure employment (“hire and fire”; fluid labour markets) – vocational training / education: vocational education offered on market; labour force has high general skills – inter-firm relations: market relations, competition; use of formal contracting and subcontracting relationships.

7. Coordinated Market Economies • GERMANY – corporate governance: long-term bank-dominated insider systems; cross-directorships; cross-shareholding; – employee relations: long term, formalised participation of employees; consensus decision-making with management – industrial relations: trade unions and employers organised; industry wide collective bargaining and pay determination; employment relatively secure – vocational training: elaborate industry-based training schemes; labour force has high industry-specific and firm-specific skills – inter-firm relations: development of collaborative networks; cooperation among firms in diffusing technologies

8. Industrial relations regimes • 5 geographical clusters – Jelle Visser, 2008, in: EC, Industrial Relations in Europe Report, Brussels, DG EMP.

9. 9 Centre-East South Centre-West North West

10. 10 North Centre–West South West Centre–East IR regime Nordic corporatism social partnership polarised pluralism liberal pluralism transition economies role of SPs in public policy institutionalised irregular/ politicised rare/event-driven irregular/ politicised role of State limited ‘shadow’ of hierarchy frequent intervention non-intervention organiser of transition power balance labour-oriented balanced alternating employer-oriented state bargaining style integrative distributive/ conflict-oriented acquiescent employee representation union based/ high coverage dual channel/ high coverage variable/ mixed union based/ small coverage predominant level of CB sector sector/company company

11. Trade Unions Intersectoral level Government Employers Intersectoral level Sectoral level Sectoral level Company level Levels of CB Company level Belgium Finland Austria Denmark1 France1 Germany Greece Ireland1 Italy Luxembourg1 Netherlands Portugal1 Spain1 Sweden1 Denmark2 France2 Ireland2 Luxembourg2 Portugal2 Spain2 Sweden2 UK

12. Trade Unions Intersectoral level Government Employers Intersectoral level Sectoral level Sectoral level Company level Levels of CB Company level Slovenia 1 Bulagaria1 Cyprus 1 Slovakia 1 Slovenia 2 Bulgaria2 Croatia Cyprus 2 Czech Rep. Estonia Hungary Latvia Lithuania Malta Poland Romania Slovakia 2

13. Trade Union density rate (ESDE 2015)

14. Employer density rate (ESDE 2015)

15. Collective bargaining coverage and dominant level of CB (ESDE 2015)

16. Days not worked due to industrial action – 2009-2013 (ESDE 2015)

17. Monthly minimum wage _ 2011 v 2016 EIRO 2013/14 BG RO LV EE LT HU CZ PL SK HR PT EL ES SI MT EU CY DE IE FR BE NL UK LU 2011 128 158 285 290 232 338 310 345 327 385 485 585 641 748 685 661 855 146114251415144610901757 2016 214 276 287 430 350 353 360 430 405 407 530 580 655 763 792 805 870 1460146414661501152417291922 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 EUR 2011 2016

18. Average hourly labour costs (2012) EIRO 2014 BG RO LV LT PL HU SK EE CZ PT GR SI CY EU UK ES IT IE DE AT FI NL SE FR LU BE DK 2012 3 4.4 5.3 5.8 7.4 7.5 8.3 8.4 11 12 15 15 18 20 20 21 28 29 30 31 31 32 33 34 35 37 38 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 EUR

19. Real labour productivty (2012) EIRO 2014 EE SI LV LT PL CZ MT CY EU IT BE AT FI DE SE FR NL IE 2012 1.7 2.4 8.2 10.3 10.4 13.2 14.5 21.5 27 32.2 37.2 39.5 39.5 42.6 44.9 45.4 45.6 50.4 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 EUR per h worked

20. 20 Research questions 1 2 3 4 6 5

21. 21 1. Which elements can be identified as the key dimensions and sub-dimensions of a comparative framework for industrial relations? 2. Which indicators and which data sources can be used for measuring these dimensions?

22. 22 Key dimensions 2 3 4 6 5 1

23. 23

24. INDUSTRIAL DEMOCRACY JOB & EMPLOYMENT QUALITY INDUSTRIAL COMPETITVENESSSOCIAL JUSTICE

25. 26 Views of stakeholders 1 2 3 4 6 5

26. 27

27. 28

28. 29

29. 30 IR cluster perspective 1 2 3 4 6 5

30. 31 Centre-East South Centre-West North West

31. 32

32. 33 Indicators 1 2 3 4 6 5

33. 35 - Relevance: Can the indicator be brought into strong association with one or several issues of one of the four key dimensions? Will the indicator be able to detect and display a variation that is important enough to warrant further investigation? Due to its importance, this criterion was double-weighted. - Validity & embeddedness: Does the indicator indeed measure what it claims to measure? Is it not confounded by other factors? I.e. does the measure adequately represent all facets of a concept? How well is it embedded in the overall concept? - Availability and accessibility of data: Is time-series data available? In which intervals? Is data accessible in the first place? The higher the interval, the more useful the data! - Comparability: Is aggregated comparable across all EU member states plus Norway? I.e. are all countries in the EU covered by the indicator?

34. 36

35. 37 any proposals for other indicators ??? - - - - - - -

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