Mr. Keith Kleine - State of the Equine Industry

Information about Mr. Keith Kleine - State of the Equine Industry

Published on May 14, 2015

Author: trufflemedia

Source: slideshare.net

Content

1. Keith Kleine, MS Director of Industry Relations CURRENT TRENDS IN THE HORSE INDUSTRY

2. The Economy John Holland, President of Equine Welfare Alliance A H G U C

3. Breed Transfer Trends 2000–2011 Breed Membership Trends 2000–2011 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Quarter Horse Paint Standardbred Arabian Appaloosa Tennesse Walking BREED TRANSFER AND MEMBERSHIP TRENDS 0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 350,000 400,000 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 AQHA Paint Arabian Standardbred Appaloosa Tennessee Walking

4. AQHA Transfers - 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

5. Transfers in the Industry Quarter Horse Paint Standardbred * Arabian Appaloosa Tennessee Walking

6. INDUSTRY COMPARISON Percentage Percentage Percentage Decrease from Decrease from Decrease from Breed 2012 to 2013 2006 to 2013 2000 to 2013 Quarter Horse -11.8% -55.1% -49.2% Paint 4.6% -65.9% -78.5% Thoroughbred -2.1% -44.0% -39.1% Arabian -10.2% -53.3% -66.0% Appaloosa -11.9% -60.7% -73.7% Pinto -4.8% -60.0% -58.8%

7. Membership in the Industry BREED 2014 2014 vs 2013 Trend change Quarter Horse 263,528 -7,185 -2.65% Paint 50,211 -1,082 -2.11% Arabian 22,433 -1,786 -7.37% Standardbred* 17,500 -554 -3.07% Appaloosa 12,096 -780 -6.06% Tennessee Walking 5,912 -1,741 -22.75% Miniature Horse 5,028 -1,021 -16.88% Morgan Horse 6,032 -325 -5.11% Pinto* 7,200 -233 -3.13% Saddlebred 6,562 -401 -5.76% Paso Fino 3,264 -160 -4.67% Estimate*

8. Membership in the Industry Quarter Horse Paint Arabian Standardbred* Appaloosa Tennessee Walking Miniature Horse Morgan Horse Pinto* Saddlebred Paso Fino Estimate*

9. STALLION BREEDING REPORTS BY STALLION GROUPS 0 1,000 2,000 3,000 4,000 5,000 6,000 7,000 Race Stallions 0 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 18,000 20,000 Show Stallions 0 5,000 10,000 15,000 20,000 25,000 30,000 35,000 Other Activity Stallions

10. Horse Registrations Trends

11. AQHA Registrations 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 180,000 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014

12. Registrations in the Industry BREED 2014 14 vs 13 Trend change Quarter Horse 83,146 9,032 12.19% Paint 11,572 -1,837 -13.70% Thoroughbred * 22,000 -1,000 -4.35% Standardbred 7,448 -329 -4.23% Tennessee Walking 2,825 -1,329 -31.99% Arabian 3,489 207 6.31% Appaloosa 2,391 -263 -9.91% Miniature Horse 3,715 -462 -11.06% Anglo & Half Arabian 1,045 36 3.57% Saddlebred 1,241 -295 -19.21% Ponies of America * 450 -30 -6.25% Morgan Horse 1,389 -36 -2.53% Pinto * 1,650 -53 -3.11% Paso Fino 623 134 27.40%

13. Registrations in the Industry Quarter Horse Paint Thoroughbred * Standardbred Tennessee Walking Arabian Appaloosa Miniature Horse Anglo & Half Arabian Saddlebred Ponies of America* Morgan Horse

14. AQHA Registrations by Foaling Year 0 20,000 40,000 60,000 80,000 100,000 120,000 140,000 160,000 180,000

15. 51,296 22,000 1986 2014 Projected

16. * * * * estimate * 20,000 22,000 24,000 26,000 28,000 30,000 32,000 34,000 36,000 38,000 40,000 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 37,949 22,000

17. AHC Breed Roundtable USEF  2-3% ↑ in membership/ 20% ↑ in show entries Arabians  15% ↑ in small shows/ ↑embryo transfers, exports Therapeutic Riding Assoc.  7% growth (6,000 horses) NCHA  ↑events and purses PRCA  6.4% ↑ in entries AQHA  15% ↑ in show entries/ # of horses down

18. HERITAGE CLOSES WITH 45% JUMP IN AVERAGE OKLAHOMA CITY—When the last horse exited the ring at Heritage Place Saturday, figures showed that the entire offering in the Winter Mixed Sale averaged $12,168 and the median price was $6,500. Preliminary sheets issued by the sale company and TRACK Magazine also showed that a remarkable 90% of the horses that went through the ring in the three day event were listed as “sold.” The $12,168 average was up 45% over the 2013 figure of $8,397. The $6,500 median is a 44% jump over $4,500 figure posted for the 2013 sale.

19. TB Yearling & Broodmare Sale Prices

20. U.S. Horse Population * Combined population of several additional breeds and unregistered horses 2005 American Horse Council study Deloitte Consulting ** AQHA 2010 Annual Report 9.2 Million Horses in the U.S. By Use • 3.91 million – recreation • 2.72 million – showing • 840,000 – racing • 1.75 million – other* By Breed • American Quarter Horse – 3.10 million** • Thoroughbred – 1.29 million • Other* – 4.64 million

21. Texas 1,000,000 California 700,000 Florida 500,000 Oklahoma 326,000 Kentucky 320,000 Ohio 307,000 Missouri 281,000 North Carolina 256,000 Colorado 256,000 Pennsylvania 256,000 States with Largest Horse Populations 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 1010

22. Horse Owner Demographics Estimate there are 1.8 million horse owners* Generally speaking they are:**  Female  Ages 45+  HH income of $50,000+  Employed full-time  Married *AVMA U.S. Pet Ownership & Demographic Sourcebook, 2012 **Brakke Equine Marketing Mega Study, 2014

23. Horse Owner Demographics*  85% Recreational rider  30% Participate in competitive events  11% Breed horses  10% Manage a horse facility  9% Groom or exercise horses  7% Are professional trainers  2% Own race horses *Brakke Equine Marketing Mega Study, 2014

24. Horse Owner Demographics*  24% believe horse economy is improving  24% believe horse economy is getting worse  48% ride Western Style  Most often compete in barrel racing, pleasure & trail events  16% ride English-style  Most often compete in hunter and dressage events *Brakke Equine Marketing Mega Study, 2014

25. Current Culture and Attitudes  Horse crazy boomers aging, new generations have multiple other interests  Horse world can seem arrogant to none horse owners  Increased public concern with horse welfare

26. Major Horse Industry Issues  Horse welfare  Federal/ State Pending Legislation  Unacceptable training techniques  Processing of Horses for meat  Emerging diseases  Declining horse ownership

27. Equine Welfare Issues: Unwanted Horses, Racing, Wild Horses, Show Horse Ethics, TWH Soring & Horse Slaughter The Public’s concern for horse welfare is at an all time high, while the Public’s knowledge of what constitutes good horse welfare is at an all time low

28. Welfare “Animal welfare is fast becoming the major challenge of the veterinary profession for this century.” Dr. Bernie Osborn Dean Emeritus of the University of California Davis School of Veterinary Medicine

29. Welfare “The greatest threat to animal agriculture is a misinformed consumer (public).” Todd Allen Former President, Kansas Livestock Association

30. Center for Food Integrity Survey: Most credible source of information on farm animal care according to consumers 16% 12% 12% 6% 0% 10% 20% 30% HSUS Veterinarians PETA Farmers/ Ranchers

31. Survey of 5th Graders* What are the most important issues in the world? 1. Welfare of Animals 2. Protecting the Environment 3. Caring for People *USAToday 2009 Survey

32. So…we’re smart people. How difficult can making recommendations on equine welfare really be?

33. Animal Use & Care Decisions How did we get to such different places?

34. Why the Divergence on What Constitutes Good Welfare? Our views on animal welfare are conditioned by our personal knowledge base and life experiences.

35. Unwanted Horse/ Welfare Issues Complicated by: Horses as livestock vs. companion animals

36. Unwanted Horse/ Welfare Issues Complicated by: Urbanization US and Farm Populations: 1900 - 1990 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 1900 1910 1920 1930 1940 1950 1960 197 0 1980 1990 Year Population(Millions) US Population Farm Population

37. Unwanted Horse/ Welfare Issues Complicated by: Processing of horses for human consumption

38. Unwanted Horse/ Welfare Issues Complicated by: Aggressive campaign by animal activist groups

39. Unwanted Horse/ Welfare Issues Complicated by: America’s Most Beloved Animals* American Public’s love affair with the horse *Kellert, S.R., American Attitudes Toward and Knowledge of Animals: An Update, 1980

40. Welfare View- Animal Related Businesses Welfare is important—they care for animals, but……… •Production efficiencies •Cost •Competitive pressures •Return on investment •Tradition (habituation) May view animals as instruments for human use Often viewed as ‘cold’ or ‘uncaring by the public

41. Another Viewpoint: Animal Protection Activists Many not familiar with animal industries and animal care practices Most driven by genuine desire to make sure animals are used appropriately Use celebrities and emotion to carry message But………their organizations need to survive/ raise money

42. Another Viewpoint: Public Officials Come from all walks of life/experiences Most not familiar with animal use industries and animal care But………they need to be re- elected/appointed Tremendous potential for stakeholder influence

43. Another Welfare Viewpoint: The Public Urbanization Animals move from utility to companions Pet “parents” vs. owners Are moderate animal rights advocates Vision of animal welfare similar to their own, personal welfare Want a voice in protecting animals……..but not sure what that means

44. What Resonates With The Public

45. What Resonates With The Public allowed to roam freely fed a vegetarian diet small, Amish/Mennonite, family farms eggs gathered by hand

46. Unwanted Horses “Horses which are no longer wanted by their current owner because they are old, injured, sick, unmanageable, or fail to meet their owner’s expectations.”* *AAEP hosted Unwanted Horse meeting, 2005

47. Unwanted Horse Contributing Factors*  Downturn in the economy  Closing of nation’s processing facilities  High cost of euthanasia/ carcass disposal  Indiscriminate breeding *UHC’s National Assessment Study of Contributing Factors Surrounding the Unwanted Horse Issue, 2009. www.unwantedhorsecoalition.com

48. Demographics of the “Unwanted” Horse  Generally horses:  Old  Incurably lame  Behavioral problems  Dangerous  Un-adoptable feral horses (mustangs)  Fail to meet owner’s expectations  Unattractive  Not athletic  Unmarketable  Wrong color (no color)  Cost too much to care for  Normal, healthy horses of various ages and breeds

49. Unwanted Horse Demographics* Most likely to be sold  Show or competition horse  Failed to meet expectations  Quarter Horse; Paint; Thoroughbred  3-10 years of age  45% mares; 48% geldings Most likely to be donated  Race horse  Failed to meet expectations  Thoroughbred; Quarter Horse  6-20 years of age  33% mares; 63% geldings *UHC’s National Assessment Study of Contributing Factors Surrounding the Unwanted Horse Issue, 2009 www.unwantedhorsecoalition.com

50. Unwanted Horse Demographics* Most likely to be euthanized  Recreational; riding horse  Horse old or terminal illness/injury  Quarter Horse; Thoroughbred; Arabian  10-21+ years  55% geldings; 42% mares *UHC’s National Assessment Study of Contributing Factors Surrounding the Unwanted Horse Issue, 2009

51. Number of “Unwanted” Horses ~44,721 exported to Canada for processing in 2014* ~105,339 exported to Mexico for processing in 2014* Total = 150,060 Up from 138,845 in 2013 Others? Native American herds? Neglected, abandoned, abused? *USDA, Veterinary Services

52. Horse Processing Numbers

53. Horse Processing Numbers Recent Years Canada Mexico TOTAL  2010 - 68,914 52,580 121,494  2011 - 66,254 68,429 134,683  2012 - 57,749 110,202 167,951  2013 - 36,591 102,254 138,845  2014 - 44,721 105,339 150,060

54. Top Indexing Solutions for Unwanted Horse*  Reopen U.S. processing plants.  Educate owners to breed, purchase, & own responsibly.  Increase ability of private rescue/retirement facilities to care for unwanted horses.  Increase options & resources to euthanize & dispose of unwanted horses. *UHC’s National Assessment Study of Contributing Factors Surrounding the Unwanted Horse Issue, 2009

55. Processing of Horses for Human Consumption * Dallas Crown (Kaufman) Beltex (Fort Worth) * Cavel International *(De Kalb) State laws closed all three U.S. plants in 2007

56. USDA Transport Requirements 1996 Farm Bill gave USDA responsibility for regulating commercial transport of horses to slaughter & ensures:  Each horse is fit for travel  Horses provided food, water and rest prior to loading on vehicles  Each horse has enough floor space to avoid injury or discomfort.  Stallions or aggressive horses are completely segregated  Transport documents certify the date, time and place the equine(s) were loaded on conveyance.

57. Horse Transportation Studies Temple Grandin Study (CSU-1999)  63 trailer loads arriving at U.S. processing plants  92% arrived in good condition  7.7% had welfare issues  Poor Body Condition  Foot & limb problems  Lacerations  Fighting was major cause of injuries during shipment  77% of welfare issues were due to neglect or abuse by owner Caroline Stull Study (UC-Davis-1999)  29.9% injury rate in double-decker trailers  8% injury rate in straight trailers

58. Government Accountability Office (GAO) Report – June 2011 HORSE WELFARE: Action Needed to Address Unintended Consequences from Cessation of Domestic Slaughter  Findings  Closing plants reduced price of lower-to-medium priced horses by 8-21%  No affect on higher priced horses  Economic downturn reduced prices on all horses by 4-5%  Recommended options for action  Return regulation and inspection of horses for slaughter in the US  Permanently and completely outlaw the use of horses for food animals

59. Federal Welfare Legislation 1996 Farm Bill amended in 2006  Phased out double deck trailers for transport of slaughter horses  Expanded in 2011 Safeguard American Food Exports Act of 2013 (SAFE Act)  H.R. 1094—Rep. Pat Meehan (R-PA) 4/2/2013  S. 541 – Sen. Mary Landrieu (D-LA) 3/13/2013 Horse Transportation Safety Act of 2015  H.R. 1282 – Rep. (D-TN-9) 3/4/2015  Prohibits the transport of all horses in a vehicle that contains two or more levels 2014 Farm Appropriations Bill  Restricts processing plant USDA inspections

60. Racing in the 1970s: a great decade with three Triple Crown winners, but also… Seattle Slew Affirmed Secretariat

61. Breakdown of a champion filly during 1975 TV broadcast of match race Early public awareness of racehorse welfare concerns.

62. Three more breakdowns seen on TV 1990: Go for Wand 2006: Barbaro 2008: Eight Belles

63. Racing in today’s culture*  Reduced popularity  Lower # starts, # race days, handle, attendance  Aging fan base  Public concern about medications, breakdowns  Questions about drugs in all sports *Ann Dwyer. DVM

64. Medication- General public believes:  Drugs = cheating  Drugs = performance enhancement  Drugs = breakdowns

65. AAEP white papers http://www.aaep.org/equine_welfare.htm

66. Medication- The AAEP supports:  Uniform medication rules  based on science  Uniform testing procedures  RMTC Certified labs  Uniform penalties  strict punishment for repeat offenses or prohibited substances  Allowing Salix on race day  therapeutic medication for EIPH

67. Came Together in 2013

68. Challenges  Many trainers, some veterinarians, want permissive medication  There are 38 racing jurisdictions  Public cannot differentiate between therapeutic medications and performance enhancing drugs

69. Challenges  Injuries are multifactorial  Science on ways to reduce them is limited  Breakdowns will NEVER be completely eliminated

70. Other initiatives  NYRWB Task Force looked at Racehorse Health and Safety at Aqueduct  New York Racing Emergency Rules  California Racing Safety Program  Necropsy of all fatalities  Track safety program  Research  Grayson Jockey Club  Numerous university projects

71. America’s Wild Horses: The BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program In 1971, Congress passed the Wild Free- Roaming Horses and Burros Act.  Goal (with 4 subsequent amendments) is to ensure that healthy herds thrive on healthy range lands  Program protects, manages and controls our population of wild horses and burros  Management includes reducing wild herd numbers

72. BLM WH&B Mission is two fold  Healthy Ranges  Healthy Horses Not a simple task!

73. BLM Herd Management  Herd Management Areas (HMAs) sustainability reviewed by BLM  Herd reduction strategies  Fertility management • PZP vaccine • Gender ratio adjustment  Gathers-planned removals

74. BLM WH&B Program Today The BLM Wild Horse and Burro Program began as an adoption program, but has evolved into a welfare program.

75. BLM Horse & Burro Numbers 16,160 feral horses& burros in BLM adoption pipeline* $8,152/ horse if adopted 33,608 un-adoptable feral horses & burros in BLM funded sanctuaries*  $45 K lifetime care/horse, if not adopted  $46.2/ $72 Mio budget spent each year to house ≈48,726 horses & burros on the range today* 26,700 - estimated range capacity *Bureau of Land Management, 2014

76. Wild Horse & Burro Locations Nearly half (>20,000) reside in Nevada >4000 in CA, AZ, >3500 in WY, UT Small #s in OR, MT, NM, ID, CO

77. Other Feral Horses ≈50,000 horses on non-BLM federal & state land*  Not protected by “Wild Free-Roaming Horse and Burro Act”, 1971  Land Managed by:  U.S. Fish & Wildlife  U.S. Park Service  Department of Defense  U.S. Forest Service *Bureau of Land Management

78. 0 100,000 200,000 900,000 800,000 700,000 600,000 500,000 400,000 300,000 1,000,000 Population Number AML 80 Population Growth w/o Gathers and Population Control Measures

79. Historical On-Range, Off-Range, Removal & Adoption Numbers 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 On-Range Population 48,624 45,414 38,815 37,186 37,135 31,760 31,206 28,563 33,105 36,940 38,365 38,497 37,294 40,605 48,726 Animals Removed 8,631 13,277 12,029 10,081 9,899 11,023 9,926 7,726 5,275 6,413 10,255 8,877 8,522 4,178 623 Off-Range Population 6,086 9,807 14,368 17,879 20,474 23,337 27,195 29,247 31,048 31,639 34,979 40,589 46,429 49,088 47,942 Animals Adopted 81 6,192 7,630 7,746 6,165 6,644 5,701 5,172 4,772 3,706 3,474 3,074 2,844 2,583 2,671 731 0 50,000 45,000 40,000 35,000 30,000 25,000 20,000 15,000 10,000 5,000

80. Some Older Horses Are Trained A few of the mature horses (6-11 years) go to Prison Programs.  Receive 4 months training with an experienced trainer  Inmates taught horsemanship  Auction at end

81. One of The Most Successful Programs Some go to the “Extreme Mustang Makeover”  Run by the Mustang Heritage Foundation  Trained by prominent trainers for a season  Over 2000 sold or adopted from program since 2007

82. BLM Fertility Reduction Efforts Porcine Zona Pellucida vaccines to prevent pregnancy $250/mare, Must capture, vaccinate and release NOT 100% effective. Blocks conception up to 2 years Gender ratio adjustment Release more males than females

83. Alternative Fertility Control  Castrate stallions > 6 years of age  Spay mares > 6 years of age  Return to the range  Requirements by activist groups  Not influence social behavior  Have no debilitating side effects on the health of the horse  Effects are reversible

84. Soring of Tennessee Walking Horses Brief History of the Big Lick 1940’s-50’s—TW surged in popularity, esp. in South “Big Lick”—everyone wanted it! 1950’s-60’s—Short cuts developed >> Soring Shoes, weights, pads Chains Caustic chemicals

85. Shortcuts = SORING  Application, insertion or injection of any substance or material on or into a limb, or manipulation of the limb that causes pain, distress, inflammation or lameness.  Can be done with chemicals, shoes, pads, chains, or other hardware alone or in combination.  Can also be done with hoof shaping.

86. Signs of soring  Standing with feet close, shifting weight to hind legs  Irritated, scarred or dark skin on pasterns  Resistance of hoof handling or pastern palpation  Lying down a lot, reluctance to rise  Difficulty walking, “praying mantis” gait

87. “Performance Packages”  Pads, “stacks”, bolts, or heel springs affixed to hoof  Pads up to 4” at heel, 2” at toe  Often weighted  Strapped on by metal bands  Currently (2015) unregulated

88. Chemical Irritants  Caustic chemicals applied to pastern; chains increase pain.  Pain causes exaggerated gait rewarded in show ring  Kerosene, diesel. mustard or croton oil, hand cleaner, WD 40, etc.  Illegal, but in widespread use

89. “Action Devices”  Chains or rollers  Steel, aluminum, wood  Circle front pasterns  Cause pain when very heavy or if skin is inflamed  Currently (2015) one per limb allowed  Must be < 6 ounces

90. Physical soring  Trimming down to sensitive sole or removing supporting hoof wall  Inducing laminitis  Adding weight to pads, or inserting hard objects between pad and sole  Over tightening of bands holding “packages”

91. Horse Protection Act (HPA)  1970: Horse Protection Act  Soring ILLEGAL, fines set  Soring not allowed in shows, sales or exhibits  1976: HPA amendment  DQP program  USDA oversight of DQPs  DQPs licensed by HIO (horse industry orgs)

92. More history…  2006: Swabbing begins  -high # positives found.  2008: AAEP white paper on “Ending Soring”*  2010: USDA Office of Atty G. reports HPA oversight inadequate.  Faults DQP “self policing” program.  2012: Video of abuse goes viral  Escalates public concern  Big fines, criminal indictment of trainer * AAEP Paper: http://www.aaep.org/equine_welfare.htm

93. Current Situation A sored gait is still rewarded in the show ring.  8-9% of all horses at 2011 & 2012 Celebrations cited  Industry has failed to police itself.  Uncooperative with USDA enforcement efforts  Strong effort across horse industry/veterinary community to stop it

94. April 2013: “PAST” ACT—HR 1518 ”Prevent All Soring Tactics” If passed, HR 1518 would amend the HPA to:  BAN “Performance packages” (weighted shoes, wedges, hoof bands)  BAN “Action devices” Rules would apply only to Tennessee Walkers, Spotted Saddle horses and Racking horses

95. Other Pending Federal Legislation Veterinary Medicine Mobility Act of 2013  H.R. 1528—Rep. Kurt Schrader (D-OR)  S. 1171 – Sen. Jerry Moran (R-KS)  Signed into Law – July 2014 Prevent All Soring Tactics Act of 2013 (PAST act)  H.R. 1518 – Rep. Ed Whitfield (R-KY)  S. 1406 – Sen. Kelly Ayotte (R-NH) Horseracing Integrity and Safety Act of 2013  H.R. 2012 – Rep. Joseph Pitts (R-PA)  S. 973 – Sen. Tom Udall (R-NM) GovTrack.us

96. Show Ring Ethics & Unacceptable Training Techniques AQHA Welfare Commission Created  Definition of Abuse: Any excessive and/or repetitive action to cause obvious distress or discomfort to a horse.  Structure for Fines and Penalties to address abuse and unsportsmanlike conduct

97. Detrimental Genetic Diseases Will we eliminate them?  Arabians:  LFS (CCDL), Cerebral Arbiotrophy (CA), SCID (17% Carriers)  American Paints:  HYPP, PSSM 1&2, HERDA, GBED, OLWS (21.3% Carriers)  Belgians:  PSSM 1&2, Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), “Shivers”  Thoroughbreds  Recurrent Exertional Rhabdomyosis (REB)  Saddlebreds  JEB  Quarter Horses  HYPP, PSSM 1 & 2, GBED, HERDA, MH, OLWS

98. Horse Owner Demographics The proportion of horse owners 18-34 has declined 15% from 2009 to 2013  18-34 Year olds (11%)  34% Western  25% English  39% Both  35-54 Year olds (42%)  47% Western  16% English  29% Both  55 Years plus (47%)  53% Western  14% English  24% Both *Brakke Equine Marketing Mega Study, 2014

99. Declining Horse Owner Numbers  Declining horse ownership  Declining Youth participation  So………….how do we revitalize the industry and attract new owners?

100. DISCUSSION & QUESTIONS CURRENT TRENDS IN THE HORSE INDUSTRY

Related presentations


Other presentations created by trufflemedia

2009 Iowa Pork Congress Seminars
05. 02. 2009
0 views

2009 Iowa Pork Congress Seminars

2009 Pig Ski Agenda
18. 02. 2009
0 views

2009 Pig Ski Agenda

Law
Law
Dean Black - Beef Trade Missions
17. 04. 2015
0 views

Dean Black - Beef Trade Missions