presentaiton on thrive technology

Information about presentaiton on thrive technology

Published on December 18, 2007

Author: BAWare

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Slide1:  VOLUNTEERS FOR RURAL HEALTH, EDUCATION & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY Objective Founded by a group of professionals working in development subjects, thrive is an action research organization aiming to develop, showcase and implement technologies and processes of comprehensive development of the rural and underdeveloped communities in the areas of education, health, communication, agriculture, rural lighting and water lifting. Slide2:  VOLUNTEERS FOR RURAL HEALTH, EDUCATION & INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY RESOURCE CENTRE: THRIVE has developed a resource centre in a 20 acre campus in Chintapalli, which is easily accessible to the community. The resource center is complete and well equipped with all the required facilities…· Computer centre with internet connectivity· Soil and water testing laboratory· FM Radio station and experimental wireless tele-services centre· Greenhouse nursery· Community hall and recreational room with a well equipped library· Yoga centre· Fully equipped and functional Electrical & Mechanical workshop· Sports and recreational facilities Slide3:  Thrive Developmental Projects Slide4:  Solar Powered LED Lighting Slide5:  Under the PV program of MNES, about 6,10,000 systems aggregating to over 20 MW have been installed. This includes 3,85,000 solar lanterns 1,80,000 home lighting systems 41,000 street lighting systems 4204 water pumping systems and of about 1.2 MWp aggregate capacity of stand alone power plants/packs. SOLAR LIGHTING IN INDIA Slide6:  ISSUES WITH THE PRESENT SOLAR LIGHTING SYSTEMS They use florescent lightening (tube lights big or compact ones (CFL) lights ) which consumes less electricity than the filament based incandescent (normal) bulbs but still is considerable. To electrify a small hamlet populated by 100 residents, it can cost approximately 5 Lakhs rupees without subsidy. Since there are many storage batteries required the maintenance and their replacement cost is very heavy. The bulbs/ lights fail once in 6 months or so and require maintenance thus complicating the usage in a small inaccessible village. Battery storage and periodic maintenance are the main factor for the dysfunction of many of the installed systems. Slide7:  White LEDs, A Revolutionary Concept In Lighting TECHNICAL FEATURES OF LEDs : White LEDs are 'Light Emitting Diodes', a type of semiconductor. They are the newest item in today's lighting technology. Unlike other light sources, these WHITE LEDs can take a lot of punishment from vibration, heat and severe cold. WHITE LEDs can be made waterproof, and put into a lighting package with 2 to 1000 WHITE LEDs. They can be used for street lights, sign lighting, spot lighting or anything else. WHITE LEDs need 3.6VDC and use approximately 30 milliamps of current, a power dissipation of 110 milliwatts. The positive power is applied to one side of the LED semiconductor through a lead and a whisker. The other side of the semiconductor is attached to the top of the anvil that is the negative power lead. It is the chemical makeup of the LED semiconductor that determines the color of the light that the LED produces. The plastic housing has three functions: it is designed to allow the most light to escape from the semiconductor; it focuses the light, and it protects the semiconductor from the elements. Slide8:  White LEDs, A Revolutionary Concept In Lighting TECHNICAL FEATURES OF LEDs : White LEDs are 'Light Emitting Diodes', a type of semiconductor. They are the newest item in today's lighting technology. Unlike other light sources, these WHITE LEDs can take a lot of punishment from vibration, heat and severe cold. WHITE LEDs can be made waterproof, and put into a lighting package with 2 to 1000 WHITE LEDs. They can be used for street lights, sign lighting, spot lighting or anything else. WHITE LEDs need 3.6VDC and use approximately 30 milliamps of current, a power dissipation of 110 milliwatts. The positive power is applied to one side of the LED semiconductor through a lead and a whisker. The other side of the semiconductor is attached to the top of the anvil that is the negative power lead. It is the chemical makeup of the LED semiconductor that determines the color of the light that the LED produces. The plastic housing has three functions: it is designed to allow the most light to escape from the semiconductor; it focuses the light, and it protects the semiconductor from the elements. Luminosity: White LEDs, typically 20 to 60 Lumens/Watt or between 5000 & 12000 millicandela THRIVE has implemented LED Lighting through Solar Power in a village by name Choututla Tanda in the Panchayat of Yalamalamanda, Chandampet mandal, Nalgonda district. This villiage is nearly 30 KM from the major block head quarters, DEVERAKONDA. This is located in hills and there is no transportation system to the village and one has to reach the villiage by a two wheeler or good four wheel drive vehicle. This village has a population of nearly 142, residing in 30 households. These houses were constructed by the state government 10 years ago. Only two 40 amps 12 volts batteries were used for the village Each battery is charged though a single 37 watt solar panel and usually charged in a single sunny day. 3 to 4 LED bulbs were used in each house. Around 7 lights were used for street lighting. Since the consumption of electricity is very less there is no need to switch them of in the late night. Day lighting automatic switch is used, and the system switches on and off automatically in the day and night times. The battery requires just topping with water once every month. Total cost of the project Rs. 40,000 THRIVE  (Volunteers for Rural Health, Education & Information Technology ) Chintapalli, Nalgonda district Andhra Pradesh - INDIA Phone: +91-8691-233601/2, +91-98663-05772 Email: [email protected] www.thethrive.org Slide9:  White LEDs can be placed in abusive environments White LEDs can be "AC" or "DC" powered depending on the model. White LEDs are the newest lighting device on the market today. White LEDs do not produce "RF" to interfere with radio equipment. White LEDs are a proven technology. White LEDs last about 100, 000 hours of continuous use. White LEDs radiate light at a 15 to 45 degree angle depending on the model. White LEDs can be made completely waterproof for use in many marine applications. White LEDs are polarity protected, so it is hard to make an installation mistake. Some Basic Facts About White LEDs LED Unit > Luminosity: White LEDs, typically 20 to 60 Lumens/Watt or between 5000 & 12000 millicandela Slide10:  THRIVE has implemented LED Lighting through Solar Power in a village by name Choututla Tanda in the Panchayat of Yalamalamanda, Chandampet mandal, Nalgonda district. This villiage is nearly 30 KM from the major block head quarters, DEVERAKONDA. This is located in hills and there is no transportation system to the village and one has to reach the villiage by a two wheeler or good four wheel drive vehicle. This village has a population of nearly 142, residing in 30 households. These houses were constructed by the state government 10 years ago. ALTERNATIVE LIGHTING WITH LEDs Slide11:  Only two 40 amps 12 volts batteries were used for the villiage Each battery is charged though a single 37 watt solar panel and usually charged in a single sunny day. 3 to 4 LED bulbs were used in each house. Around 7 lights were used for street lighting. Since the consumption of electricity is very less there is no need to switch them of in the late night. Day lighting automatic switch is used, and the system switches on and off automatically in the day and night times. The battery requires just topping with water once every month. The Lighting System Slide12:  The total cost of Implementation of this system was surprisingly less than Rs. 50000 INR for the entire village and approximately 5 Rs a month for each household to replace the battery after 3 years. The COST involved in providing conventional electricity for lighting to this village would exceed well over Rupees 10Lakhs INR and needs minimum 1 Lakh Rupees for Line losses and maintenance every year. The user has to pay for lighting and replace bulbs frequently and has to bear with limited supply from the grid. Whereas, The total time for Implementation of this system was just 1 week, with installation taking just 1 Day. The TIME involved in providing conventional electricity for lighting to this village would exceed well over an year Whereas, Slide13:  Community Radio Slide14:  Community radio is very inexpensive and it is owned by the community(it may cost any where from 10,000 Rs to 1,00,000 Rs) The signal is broadcast in FM mode and it generally reaches upto 20 Km depending on the topography of the area. A user can reach the services with a very inexpensive radio costing 30 Rs. to 100 Rs. any where in the coverage area. Any type of service can be broadcast like, weather, pest information, visits of the officers, scientists, workshops, Camps, marriages, deaths call for the doctor and emergency services, Mandi prices and availability and workload, local music, interviews with local officers. (even missing cattle information) Government NOW PERMITS campus wide radio broadcast for educational and training institutes. Community radio Slide15:  Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Slide16:  70 of the population of the state of Andhra Pradesh are dependent on agriculture for their livelihood. Though there are major surface water projects and big dams, most of the Telenagana districts and some areas in costal and Rayalaseema are dependent on the ground water for agriculture operations. At present there are more than 20 Lakhs pump sets in Andhra Pradesh and usually they are of 5 horse power category. As the ground water level lowers every year, farmers have gone for submersible pump sets. GOAP charges a flat rate on each pump set irrespective of the consumption. However the supply to the agriculture pump sets is limited to less than 8 hrs. With the increasing cost of power and depleting ground water resources, it is becoming increasingly difficult to subsidize/finance the agriculture pump sets.   An alternative model based on turbine systems which address the inadequacies of the existing system has been developed in collaboration with MS AITKIN Australia CONSULTANTS and THRIVE organisation, Chintapally at a cost of Rs. 80,000. At present the utilization of wind turbines for water pumping is quite limited and restricted few NGOs and model farms. The available models generally supply low volume of water for domestic consumption only. Generally the fan type wind pumps are employed and all of them are imported from Netherlands and other countries. Fan type wind mills have complicated rudder mechanism and a system of gears. Maintenance of the system is not available with the local people and consequently they are non functional in most of the places they are installed. WIND TURBINE FOR WATER PUMPING Slide17:  It has all the advantages of renewable sources of energy and causes no pollution etc. It can pump upto 2 inch water based on the ground water availability and wind speed It needs hardly any maintenance as there are no gears and rudder and related complexities It can operate at very low wind speeds of 6 KM per hour It can be mounted next to the bore well thus facilitating reboring or deepening the existing borewell. It is all likely that it can run for more than 7 hours a day. This model at present has been successfully pumping the water and is undergoing some tests and small modifications so that a mass scale replication is possible. Features:- Click for Video Slide18:  Activities Slide19:  India is a agriculture dependent country with a huge variation in topography and climate. Agriculture planning, monitoring and support needs accurate weather data for higher level agencies down to a farmer. At present weather monitoring, forecast in India is very inadequate in terms of coverage, quality and its application for day to day use by the ultimate beneficiary. The main reason for it being the centralized system (Hyderabad or Bombay) , lack of weather conscious field staff, low quality crude manual equipment and others. Weather monitoring station Slide20:  Transmission Range up to 400' Add optional repeaters for more range up to .6 mile Temperature, Base: Range 32° to 140°F. Resolution ±0.1°F Temperature, Remote: Range -40° to 140°F. Resolution ±0.1°F Humidity, Base: 10 to 90% RH. Resolution ±1% RH Humidity, Remote: 0 to 100% RH. Resolution ±1% RH Barometric Pressure: Range 26.00" to 32.00" Hg. Resolution ±0.05" Hg. Maximum 12,000' altitude usage. Barometric Pressure Trend: with alarm Time: user-set, 12/24 hour, alarm, calendar Rainfall, Daily: Range 0 to 99.99". Resolution ±.01 inch or .25 mm Rainfall, Monthly and Yearly: Range 0 to 199.99". Wind Speed: Range 2 to 120 mph. Resolution ±1 mph/kph Wind Direction: Range 0° to 360°. Resolution ±1° Compass Rose: all 16 Compass Points N, NE, E, SE etc. Dew Point: Range -105° to 130°F. Resolution ±0.1°F Wind Chill: Range -120° to 130°F. Resolution ±0.1°F Parameters measured by the Weather Station.. Slide21:  Parameters Contdd.. Slide30:  Wi-fi A Community Perspective Slide31:  ‘Wifi’ – What it stands for? “Wi-fi / Wireless-Fidelity, Otherwise known as 802.11 Wireless Network, is an open-standard, open spectrum, open-source, open-hardware, mode of wireless inter-connectivity for participating devices.” 2 Slide32:  3 Traditional Ethernet Connections (802.3):- Twisted Pair Ethernets Coax-Cable Ethernets Fiber Optic Networks Wireless Networks Wireless Connections (802.11):- Bluetooth (Low frequency radio signals) Data Rate: 10 Mbps – 1 Gbps using 10 Base T or CAT 3 or CAT 5 Cabling, Effective Distance: 100mts. (Extended using hubs and switches) Data Rate: 10 Mbps using Thick Ethernet (10 base 5), 500mts. Effective Distance: 500mts. (Extended using hubs and switches) Data Rate: Upto 2.5Gbps, ‘10BaseF’ Cable Effective Distance: Upto several Kilometers. Typically 30 to 50. Data Rate: Upto 1 Mbps. Effective Distance: 10mts - 100mts max. Data Rate: Upto 55 Mbps Effective Distance: 100mts to 300mts. (Extended to > 30 Km., using antennas) Slide33:  4 Wifi compliant devices use the unlicensed, open-spectrum radio waves, to carry internet data. 802.11 IEEE Specification 802.11b:- - 5 GHz frequency, upto 54 Mbps Bandwidth 802.11a:- - 2.4 GHz frequency, upto 11 Mbps Bandwidth 802.11g:- - 2.4 GHz frequency, upto 55 Mbps Bandwidth Standards.. Slide34:  5 What a wireless network is made up of:- Base stations, Access points, or Gateways Wireless Network cards Radios which send and receive signals from other radios or access points, usually PCMCIA* cards which fit into Laptop expansion slots, or PCI Bus in case of Desktop computers. (There are other, simpler options using USB). PDAs like PALM, and Pocket PC having a compact flash slot can also connect. * PCMCIA – Personal Computer Memory Card International Association. The base station sends and receives radio signals to and from the Wi-Fi radio in your laptop or PC, enabling you to share your Internet connection with other users on the network. Access points and gateways have a wide range of features and performance capabilities, but they all provide this basic network connection service. Slide35:  6 Community wifi Traditional wifi network Used in offices and business to provide roaming facility for laptop users, as in Airport Hotspots. Home, Offices and Institutions, Campuses (Access b/w buildings). Consists typically of Access points and Network cards. Community Wifi Connecting one or two campuses a few miles apart, to connecting many subscribers along a corridor several hundred miles long. Consists typically of Customer Premises Equipment (CPE) The radio or network card A short cable and a directional antenna with high gain Towers with sector antennas in different directions which will talk with the CPE High gain directional antennas on these towers to catch the signal from other distant towers to complete the network At the subscribers base the traditional Ethernet can be used Slide36:  7 Typical Community Wifi Constituents High gain Parabolic grid antennas to beam the signal to over 30km from tower to tower.. Typically 5.7-5.8 GHz,  2' Diameter Parabolic Grid Antenna,  26 dBi gain, 6 degree beam width, N-Female connector Customer Premises equipment (CPE) to access the signal from the towers.. Typically 23dBm Radio+15dBi Antenna = 38dBm Sector antennas to beam the signal from the towers to the community users Typically 2.4-2.5 GHz, 90 degree sector antenna, 17 dBi gain Other components that need to be installed in order to put the above systems together Slide37:  8 THRIVE, Now a Wifi Campus THRIVE has put Wifi to use within the campus using 802.11b wireless technology. The System consists of a ‘NetGear’ Wireless Router mounted atop the communication tower which beams a wifi signal accessible to anyone using a wifi-enabled computer within the boundaries of the campus without using any other amplifying antennae at about 300mts radius of the tower. THRIVE is in the process of setting up a campus monitoring and surveillance system using wifi. A visitor testing the wifi signal around the THRIVE campus. Slide38:  9 Capabilities and Uses High data transmission rate and high reliability in all weather conditions, and an always available (95% Uptime) network makes wifi a robust solution suitable for high bandwidth applications…. - Online video-conferencing with greater clarity - Telephony, using VoIP - Revenue-model for budding start-up ISPs - Broadband in the true sense - Easier reach into far-flung rural areas Ability to add more nodes as and when required Less maintenance overheads, especially in Rural areas where technical manpower is scarce Slide39:  10 Hyderabad – Sagar Wifi Corridor Extending wifi to the community The 120 Km state highway between Hyderabad and Nagarjuna Sagar is an Ideal corridor for wifi implementaon Potentially there are 200 Schools, 10 Engineering Colleges, several MBA and Degree Colleges, Gram Panchayats, Government offices, NGOs and other Institutions active in this region, who are looking for a reliable internet connectivity.. This provides for a sustainable revenue model for Implementation of the wifi corridor. Hyderabad Ibrahimpatnam Yacharam Mall Chintapalli Mallepalli Nagarjuna Sagar Devarkonda Slide40:  No. Tower School or College Gram Panchayat office Other Subscribers Map of the 120 Km long, 20 Km wide Wifi Corridor Slide41:  12 Applications and services that can be provided - High speed Internet - Secure Local Intranet for Govt. Establishments - Bandwidth on Demand - Video Conferencing - Internet Telephony thro. VoIP* - Tele-Agriculture & Tele-medicine Counseling - Internet HOT-SPOTS accessible to registered subscribers * VoIP:- Voice over Internet Protocol Slide42:  13 Potential Subscribers (Paying and Non-Paying) About 200 Schools (Govt. and Pvt.) Engineering, MBA and MCA Colleges (1 – 2 Computers in each) (50-100 Computers in each) Gram Panchayat Offices (1 Computer in each) Government Establishments (2 - 4 Computers in each) Private Institutions and NGOs (2 - 4 Computers in each) Internet Browsing Centers (4 - 5 Computers in each) Slide43:  14 Successful Implementations of Wifi in India & Abroad Digital Gangetic Plain – “Infothela” The researchers of Media Labs Asia based at IIT Kanpur have taken a technology designed for indoor use as a replacement for wired local area networks and have stretched it to 75km and beyond between Kanpur and Lucknow. They have made available a mobile koisk called ‘infothela’ whichis wifi-enabled and will provide a range of Govt. services from health to education. Bhutan - Internet Telephony using VoIP A pilot project to use wireless and VoIP technologies to deliver communication services to rural areas in Bhutan, a small Himalayan Kingdom, was completed with encouraging results. Torornto – Montreal Wifi Link along Rail Line TORONTO – Canada's national passenger train service is offering wireless Internet access to riders with their own Wi-Fi devices travelling between Toronto and Montreal The Highest Wireless Network (WiFi - 802.11b) in the Northeast US In the winter of 2003, a solar-powered Web camera was deployed in northern New Hampshire, and in the process, the highest wireless network (WiFi - 802.11b) in the northeast United States came into operation across 5 miles of backcountry. Slide44:  15 A Final Word Slide45:  16 UNITeS Explores Applications of Wireless to Development In his Millennium Report, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan stressed the importance for developing countries to benefit from opportunities emerging from the digital revolution, and stressed the vital role volunteers are playing in helping to bridge the digital divide between industrialized and developing countries, in key fields like health, education, income generation, gender equity, environment and humanitarian aid. UNITeS: United Nations Information Technology Service What significance could wireless technologies have in developing countries? Are there impacts WiFi is having already? Where is wireless tech currently being used successfully, anywhere in the world, to build a sense of community, to give people better Internet access, etc., and do/could these applications have significance in developing countries? Slide46:  17 Thank You

Related presentations


Other presentations created by BAWare

Integration into the SDLC
30. 08. 2007
0 views

Integration into the SDLC

hot topic
28. 09. 2007
0 views

hot topic

hispanics
01. 10. 2007
0 views

hispanics

zhang
10. 10. 2007
0 views

zhang

schwa
30. 08. 2007
0 views

schwa

aocc
30. 08. 2007
0 views

aocc

Pedersen
30. 08. 2007
0 views

Pedersen

Mining Sciences
30. 08. 2007
0 views

Mining Sciences

Intelligence Gathering mallorca
30. 08. 2007
0 views

Intelligence Gathering mallorca

ppt00021
30. 08. 2007
0 views

ppt00021

hoe wat over adsl
30. 11. 2007
0 views

hoe wat over adsl

The Healthy Potato
04. 12. 2007
0 views

The Healthy Potato

KINDS OF NOUNS
05. 11. 2007
0 views

KINDS OF NOUNS

CUPA 2007 Adv HW part 3
07. 11. 2007
0 views

CUPA 2007 Adv HW part 3

p Javier Carrillo
14. 11. 2007
0 views

p Javier Carrillo

High Intensity Interval Training
13. 12. 2007
0 views

High Intensity Interval Training

measurement
17. 12. 2007
0 views

measurement

OWASP AppSecEU2006 AJAX Security
30. 08. 2007
0 views

OWASP AppSecEU2006 AJAX Security

Feb05Sepracor
29. 11. 2007
0 views

Feb05Sepracor

aula17
28. 12. 2007
0 views

aula17

lab 04
11. 12. 2007
0 views

lab 04

cattle2000
31. 12. 2007
0 views

cattle2000

Mechanized Logging
02. 01. 2008
0 views

Mechanized Logging

Lightning Safety
03. 01. 2008
0 views

Lightning Safety

water problems
21. 11. 2007
0 views

water problems

mideastmaps
07. 01. 2008
0 views

mideastmaps

schulze
12. 10. 2007
0 views

schulze

Sept 17 03B
19. 11. 2007
0 views

Sept 17 03B

Empowerment2
29. 10. 2007
0 views

Empowerment2

LIU MIT 2006
28. 11. 2007
0 views

LIU MIT 2006

USFS Tourism
22. 11. 2007
0 views

USFS Tourism

omni partner guide pps
02. 10. 2007
0 views

omni partner guide pps

convergence
28. 12. 2007
0 views

convergence

sal mauro 061128
28. 02. 2008
0 views

sal mauro 061128

lec05
29. 02. 2008
0 views

lec05

nypss nsta nov 2003
26. 06. 2007
0 views

nypss nsta nov 2003

Movies MC 061129 3
26. 06. 2007
0 views

Movies MC 061129 3

MOUG 08 2002
26. 06. 2007
0 views

MOUG 08 2002

mold
26. 06. 2007
0 views

mold

moilanen movies
26. 06. 2007
0 views

moilanen movies

MMC Bonato
26. 06. 2007
0 views

MMC Bonato

mm class 8
26. 06. 2007
0 views

mm class 8

Oceans 2005
26. 06. 2007
0 views

Oceans 2005

C3A6
04. 01. 2008
0 views

C3A6

Session8Massimiliano Claps
21. 03. 2008
0 views

Session8Massimiliano Claps

paper Columbia pipelines
30. 08. 2007
0 views

paper Columbia pipelines

CDW Ches99 Talk
05. 01. 2008
0 views

CDW Ches99 Talk

Marketing Mix IPG Presentation
26. 03. 2008
0 views

Marketing Mix IPG Presentation

Moab Marketing
27. 03. 2008
0 views

Moab Marketing

0Kim
30. 08. 2007
0 views

0Kim

Coglx to cultlx
22. 11. 2007
0 views

Coglx to cultlx

12 Igra 4pm
06. 12. 2007
0 views

12 Igra 4pm

Rao
28. 03. 2008
0 views

Rao

Goorevich Richard
30. 03. 2008
0 views

Goorevich Richard

06MYMRes2
09. 04. 2008
0 views

06MYMRes2

quickreview
10. 04. 2008
0 views

quickreview

MontanaDDpresentatio n060105a
13. 04. 2008
0 views

MontanaDDpresentatio n060105a

The Happy Monkey
29. 11. 2007
0 views

The Happy Monkey

cnea 376
20. 11. 2007
0 views

cnea 376

e know GV Presentation
17. 04. 2008
0 views

e know GV Presentation

SustainabilityCaseSt udies
22. 04. 2008
0 views

SustainabilityCaseSt udies

mark
30. 08. 2007
0 views

mark

Dialectal Differentiation
24. 11. 2007
0 views

Dialectal Differentiation

Chapter01
30. 08. 2007
0 views

Chapter01

n0102 SPIE1
26. 06. 2007
0 views

n0102 SPIE1

tues RMI cloonan
07. 12. 2007
0 views

tues RMI cloonan

Modi
26. 06. 2007
0 views

Modi

mne tools scripts kskassam
26. 06. 2007
0 views

mne tools scripts kskassam

hausmesse vortrag meyer
16. 11. 2007
0 views

hausmesse vortrag meyer

sjw
21. 12. 2007
0 views

sjw

stew cartons
17. 06. 2007
0 views

stew cartons

stellmach tim
17. 06. 2007
0 views

stellmach tim

Twelfth Night 2
17. 06. 2007
0 views

Twelfth Night 2

tuebingen seminar nov 04
17. 06. 2007
0 views

tuebingen seminar nov 04

TNG Presentation1
17. 06. 2007
0 views

TNG Presentation1

THE SCIENCE OF LOVE
17. 06. 2007
0 views

THE SCIENCE OF LOVE

t06B Functions Examples
17. 06. 2007
0 views

t06B Functions Examples

Sunny
17. 06. 2007
0 views

Sunny

28 1330 HARP rohacs hideg
18. 03. 2008
0 views

28 1330 HARP rohacs hideg

Water way Awareness
17. 06. 2007
0 views

Water way Awareness

Watergate Political Cartoons
17. 06. 2007
0 views

Watergate Political Cartoons

Valentine s PPT
17. 06. 2007
0 views

Valentine s PPT

USB FunctionDrv
17. 06. 2007
0 views

USB FunctionDrv

urban legends
17. 06. 2007
0 views

urban legends

unti 17Le 1 Funny stories
17. 06. 2007
0 views

unti 17Le 1 Funny stories

Understanding Political Cartoons
17. 06. 2007
0 views

Understanding Political Cartoons

Week2 Augustineandhisera
17. 06. 2007
0 views

Week2 Augustineandhisera

Tee
09. 10. 2007
0 views

Tee

seshun
13. 11. 2007
0 views

seshun

Locke 1 07
30. 08. 2007
0 views

Locke 1 07

ames tornado
05. 10. 2007
0 views

ames tornado

TEAM 9
08. 11. 2007
0 views

TEAM 9

Ferragina
23. 11. 2007
0 views

Ferragina

robo wk 4 controls
07. 01. 2008
0 views

robo wk 4 controls

ScottStroup
02. 11. 2007
0 views

ScottStroup

dyer w ref
04. 03. 2008
0 views

dyer w ref

act31sld
30. 08. 2007
0 views

act31sld

WA Final
17. 06. 2007
0 views

WA Final

EnB presentatie Fischbacher
30. 08. 2007
0 views

EnB presentatie Fischbacher

What to do in Harrisonburg
17. 06. 2007
0 views

What to do in Harrisonburg