Rebranding Cornwall Thalia

Information about Rebranding Cornwall Thalia

Published on March 30, 2009

Author: tainsh

Source: authorstream.com

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Slide 1: Rebranding Cornwall By: Thalia De Sa Slide 2: SEASIDE RESORT TOURIST DESTINATION GREEN IMAGE Slide 3: Every year, over 4 million tourists visit Cornwall for its spectacular coastal scenery and beaches. It is the UK’s top destination for family holidays and short breaks. Many people who live there feel that it is in crisis and in need of regeneration. This is due to the decline in the rural economy, the lack of rural services and employment opportunities as well as the low wages. Cornwall has declined in a number of sectors such as farming, fishing, mining, quarrying and tourism. Slide 4: Why has is declined? FARMING Falling farm prices, as supermarkets seek the lowest prices from their suppliers Importing food from overseas, where wages and costs are lower Withdrawing EU subsidies which has led to a rapid and accelerating decline EU quotas have allocated fish supplies to other European countries The decline in overall fish stocks caused by previous over-fishing FISHING Slide 5: MINING QUARRYING TOURISM The exhaustion of the tin reserves in Cornwall A collapse in tin prices caused by overseas competition The strength of the pound has made the UK tin more expensive to buy overseas The St Austell area has some of the world’s best china reserves. However, fewer and larger quarries, using technology rather than people to extract the clay, has resulted in cutbacks in the workforce. The jobs are mainly seasonal, part time and poorly paid The visitor numbers vary between seasons and depend a lot on the weather only 33% of profit from tourism stays in Cornwall – the rest ‘leaks’ out of the country Slide 6: The average visitor duration of stay has also changed, with an increase in the shorter breaks of three to seven days throughout the year and less of the conventional seven or fourteen day holidays of the 1970s and 1980s. The Cornwall Visitor Survey in 2004/05 showed that the majority of visitors were staying in Newquay, St Ives, Bude and Falmouth - almost 50%. More than a fifth planned to visit the towns of Newquay, Padstow, Penzance, Falmouth and Truro during their stay. The Eden Project is still the most popular tourist attraction in the area with over one million visitors in 2004. Other important tourist attractions include the National Maritime Museum in Falmouth and Tate St Ives. The numbers of visits to some of the main attractions in the area are provided in the Figure above. Slide 7: Tourism is vital to the well-being of Cornwall and has been estimated to contribute as much as 24% of the County’s GDP (Cornwall Tourism Board).  In 2003, domestic and overseas visitors made in excess of five million trips to Cornwall and spent in excess of £1.216m (South West Tourism). The trend in annual visitor numbers is shown in the Figure above.  The overwhelming majority of visitors are from the UK, with 30% being from the South East. Slide 8: The need to rebrand Cornwall’s rural economy is suffering from a collapse in farm prices It needs to diversify by creating a year-round economy There are serious attempts to rebrand Cornwall and attract new tourists: The main concept is DESTINATION TOURISM – where people simply visit a place because of a single attraction. The hope is that they will then visit others The EDEN PROJECT is an excellent example of this! Slide 9: Rebranding techniques THE EDEN PROJECT In March 2001, the Eden Project opened to visitors It consists of two large conservations – known at Eden as ‘biomes’ – between them, they include 100 000 plants representing 5000 species. Eden consists of: a humid tropics biome (humid tropical plants) a warm temperature biome (Mediterranean plants, and plants from places such as South Africa) Slide 10: HOW SUCCESSFUL HAS THE EDEN PROJECT BEEN IN REGENERATING AND RE-IMAGING THE AREA? The Eden Project has transformed the local landscape: The area around St Austell is quarried for china clay, which leaves huge white waste heaps and open quarries on the landscape. In contrast to its image as a holiday destination, Cornwall has the UK’s highest percentage of derelict land. The Eden Project in the bottom of the china clay pit was an opportunity to RE-IMAGE THE ENVIRONMENT THE PROBLEMS Traffic levels have increased The Eden Project is ironically a major source of pollution in the area The 3500 cars that fill Eden’s parking spaces, generate more CO² emissions than all other sources in St Austell combined Slide 11: THE BENEFITS Visitor numbers have increased; within the first 6 months, it was the UK’s third-most visited attraction Visitor spending is high – each visitor the Eden Project spends on average £150 in Cornwall Demand for accommodation has doubled since 2001 Employment has increased – the Eden Project employs 400 full-time staff The Eden Project has boosted local farmers and food-processing companies The Eden Project has created interest for other attractions such as the National Maritime Museum at Falmouth In 2003, an average of 80% of Cornwall’s businesses said they felt that Eden had brought very positive impacts for them and the Cornish economy Slide 12: Rebranding and funding from the European Union Objective One money is money provided to rural areas that are in decline. Cornwall benefits from it due to the poverty associated with the problems mentioned earlier. Slide 13: Assess each of the following projects that were assisted by Objective One money: Extreme Academy, Fifteen, Combined Universities of Cornwall and various Arts Festivals. Assess how successful they think their project has been Feedback and decide which do you believe is the most successful giving reasons. Next – Rebranding Farming

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