sc4wg2n0190 WTO FCC 433

Information about sc4wg2n0190 WTO FCC 433

Published on May 8, 2008

Author: Rainero

Source: authorstream.com

Content

World Trade Organization (WTO):  World Trade Organization (WTO) WTO: Multilateral Agreements On Trade In Goods—Technical Barriers:  Clause 2.4 “Where technical regulations are required and relevant international standards exist or their completion is imminent, Members shall use them, or the relevant parts of them, as a basis for their technical regulations except when such international standards or relevant parts would be an ineffective or inappropriate means for the fulfillment of the legitimate objectives pursued, for instance because of fundamental climatic or geographical factors or fundamental technological problems.” Clause 3.4 “Members shall not take measures which require or encourage local government bodies or nongovernmental bodies within their territories to act in a manner inconsistent with the provisions of Article 2.” Clause 3.5 “Members are fully responsible under this Agreement for the observance of all provisions of Article 2. Members shall formulate and implement positive measures and mechanisms in support of the observance of the provisions of Article 2 by other than central government bodies.” WTO: Multilateral Agreements On Trade In Goods—Technical Barriers WTO: Multilateral Agreements On Trade In Goods—Technical Barriers:  Clause 5.4 “In cases where a positive assurance is required that products conform with technical regulations or standards, and relevant guides or recommendations issued by international standardizing bodies exist or their completion is imminent, Members shall ensure that central government bodies use them, or the relevant parts of them, as a basis for their conformity assessment procedures, except where, as duly explained upon request, such guides or recommendations or relevant parts are inappropriate for the Members concerned, for, inter alia, such reasons as: national security requirements; the prevention of deceptive practices; protection of human health or safety, animal or plant life or health, or the environment; fundamental climatic or other geographical factors; fundamental technological or infrastructural problems.” WTO: Multilateral Agreements On Trade In Goods—Technical Barriers Federal Communications Commission (FCC):  Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Slide5:  FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: NEWS MEDIA CONTACT: April 15, 2004 Lauren Van Wazer (202) 418-0030 FCC ADOPTS RULE CHANGES FOR IMPROVED RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION SYSTEMS TO FACILITATE HOMELAND SECURITY EFFORTS Washington, D.C. – In an effort to increase homeland security and improve the efficiency of commercial shipping operations, the Federal Communications Commission today adopted a Third Report and Order (Order) that allows for the operation of improved radio frequency identification (RFID) systems for use in conjunction with commercial shipping containers. This action is expected to result in lower shipping costs and improved security at ports, rail yards and warehouses in commercial and industrial settings by enabling the contents of containers to be rapidly inventoried. These improvements will also help system users determine whether tampering with their contents has occurred during shipping. RFID systems use radio signals to identify items. Uses of RFID include electronic toll collection such as the E-Z Pass system and anti-theft tags. An RFID system consists of a tag mounted on the item to be identified and a device that receives information transmitted from the tag. The Commission’s rules permit RFID systems to be operated on a number of frequency bands, subject to limitations on their maximum signal level and transmission duration. These limitations constrain the range and information transfer rates of RFIDs. Slide6:  The Order increases the maximum signal level permitted for RFID systems operating in the 433.5-434.5 MHz band to facilitate more reliable transmissions with greater range than the rules previously allowed. The 433 MHz band is available for unlicensed operation in many countries around the world, thus enabling manufactures to produce a single model of a device for use in both the United States and other countries. The Order also increases the maximum permitted transmission duration for these RFID systems from one second to 60 seconds, resulting in a sixty-fold increase in the amount of data that can be transmitted, thus facilitating the scanning of the contents of an entire shipping container. To minimize the risk of interference to authorized communication services, operation of RFID systems with higher power and longer transmission duration is limited to commercial shipping containers in commercial and industrial areas. Action by the Commission April 15, 2004, by Third Report and Order (FCC 04-98). Chairman Powell, Commissioners Abernathy, Copps, Martin, and Adelstein. Statement by Chairman Powell. Office of Engineering and Technology contact: Mr. Hugh L. Van Tuyl, (202) 418-7506, e-mail [email protected] ET Docket No. 01-278 ­ FCC­ Slide7:  STATEMENT OF CHAIRMAN MICHAEL K. POWELL Re: Review of Part 15 and other Parts of the Commission’s Rules, Third Report and Order, ET Docket No. 01-278 With more than two billion tons of freight traveling through U.S. ports and waterways yearly, ensuring the efficient flow of goods while reducing the possibility of terrorism and fraud is no easy task. Today’s Third Report and Order allows a powerful new technology to help secure our ports while increasing productivity. Specifically, we change Commission rules to allow for the introduction of smart shipping containers that can detect intrusions and streamline the inventory process. When you consider that a trillion dollars worth of goods pass through our ports annually, the potential economic benefits of this technology become clear. It is worth noting that some have raised privacy concerns regarding the use of radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. We are aware of these concerns, and stress that today’s ruling is narrowly tailored. The technical and operational rules we adopt today allow higher-powered/longer-duration RFID tag use on limited frequencies, and only in commercial and industrial environments. We also take steps to protect federal government radar sites from interference by requiring grantees of an equipment authorization for a 433 MHz RFID device to register their location and inform purchasers where the devices may or may not be used. I’m excited by the prospects for improved inventory control, lower costs, and increased homeland security that this technology promises to bring. Interoperability:  Interoperability The Layers of Logistic Units (Optically Readable Media):  Movement Vehicle (truck, airplane, ship, train) Layer 5 ISO TC 204 (None) AIAG B-15 Container (e.g., 40 foot Sea Container) Layer 4 ISO TC 104 (None) Layer 3 ISO TC 122/WG 4 (15394) ANS MH10.8.1 AIAG B-10/14 EIA 556-B UCC 6 / Genl EAN Spec Layer 2 ISO TC 122/WG 4 (15394) ANS MH10.8.1 AIAG B-10/14 EIA 556-B UCC 6 / Genl EAN Spec Layer 1 ISO TC 122/WG 7 (22742) ANS MH10.8.6 AIAG B-4 EIA 621/624 & IEC 62090 UCC 1 / Genl EAN Spec Layer 0 ISO TC 122 (TBD) ANS MH10.8.7 AIAG B-4 EIA SP-3497 UCC 1 / Genl EAN Spec The Layers of Logistic Units (Optically Readable Media) The Layers of Logistic Units (Radio Frequency Identification - RFID):  Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Item Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Pkg Transport Unit Transport Unit Transport Unit Transport Unit Unit Load “Pallet” Unit Load “Pallet” Container (e.g., 40 foot Sea Container) Movement Vehicle (truck, airplane, ship, train) Layer 5 Layer 4 (433 MHz, 860-960 MHz) ISO 17363 Layer 3 (433 MHz, 860-960 MHz) ISO 17364 Layer 2 (860-960 MHz) ISO 17365 Layer 1 (860-960 MHz) ISO 17366 Layer 0 (860-960 MHz) ISO 17367 The Layers of Logistic Units (Radio Frequency Identification - RFID) Note 433 MHz from ISO/IEC 18000-7 860-960 MHz from ISO/IEC 18000-6

Related presentations


Other presentations created by Rainero

Ch9 English Rstoration
03. 03. 2008
0 views

Ch9 English Rstoration

6cL opera Moz
15. 01. 2008
0 views

6cL opera Moz

PilgrimagetoOurLady
05. 02. 2008
0 views

PilgrimagetoOurLady

zweibel rice 2004 2g thin films
10. 01. 2008
0 views

zweibel rice 2004 2g thin films

pediatric ocular injuries
10. 01. 2008
0 views

pediatric ocular injuries

make home made soap
10. 01. 2008
0 views

make home made soap

where wear ware
11. 01. 2008
0 views

where wear ware

flower pol
12. 01. 2008
0 views

flower pol

Into the Vastness
13. 01. 2008
0 views

Into the Vastness

louise workshop
14. 01. 2008
0 views

louise workshop

Lord of the Flies
17. 01. 2008
0 views

Lord of the Flies

Super natural 07ClassTwo
20. 01. 2008
0 views

Super natural 07ClassTwo

3sept03 notes
22. 01. 2008
0 views

3sept03 notes

ClassDay6
22. 01. 2008
0 views

ClassDay6

DallasHistory
23. 01. 2008
0 views

DallasHistory

ncaa
24. 01. 2008
0 views

ncaa

Indonesia Yogyakarta
05. 02. 2008
0 views

Indonesia Yogyakarta

AG Int Badminton
07. 02. 2008
0 views

AG Int Badminton

March 08 Peter Stehlik
12. 02. 2008
0 views

March 08 Peter Stehlik

TechEdCiscoMar26
25. 01. 2008
0 views

TechEdCiscoMar26

L07 extrasolarplanets2
25. 01. 2008
0 views

L07 extrasolarplanets2

companions and the internet
28. 01. 2008
0 views

companions and the internet

StreamEcology
28. 01. 2008
0 views

StreamEcology

Minor Bodies
16. 01. 2008
0 views

Minor Bodies

web3d
30. 01. 2008
0 views

web3d

Advocacy Presentation DOH1
31. 01. 2008
0 views

Advocacy Presentation DOH1

online catalog
05. 02. 2008
0 views

online catalog

meadows
06. 02. 2008
0 views

meadows

1 Phosphorus Cycle
07. 02. 2008
0 views

1 Phosphorus Cycle

201 07popsystem
07. 02. 2008
0 views

201 07popsystem

AHPS 2
13. 02. 2008
0 views

AHPS 2

Tsunami aav lecture
14. 02. 2008
0 views

Tsunami aav lecture

ChivalryintheMiddleA ges
15. 02. 2008
0 views

ChivalryintheMiddleA ges

WebDAV
21. 02. 2008
0 views

WebDAV

15718 2892892007104057
16. 01. 2008
0 views

15718 2892892007104057

powerpointjeavini
25. 02. 2008
0 views

powerpointjeavini

leuven2
28. 02. 2008
0 views

leuven2

Chris Wickens PP
05. 03. 2008
0 views

Chris Wickens PP

Millett AGEP 013107
12. 03. 2008
0 views

Millett AGEP 013107

outline19
07. 02. 2008
0 views

outline19

three gorges dam powerpoint
19. 03. 2008
0 views

three gorges dam powerpoint

hsa ix66
08. 04. 2008
0 views

hsa ix66

VenturingSpecific
16. 04. 2008
0 views

VenturingSpecific

LT1001N Lecture 8 2006 7
16. 04. 2008
0 views

LT1001N Lecture 8 2006 7

489 290
17. 04. 2008
0 views

489 290

Htourist
18. 04. 2008
0 views

Htourist

TKlachan
21. 04. 2008
0 views

TKlachan

BO1 EnricoI CCRM
22. 04. 2008
0 views

BO1 EnricoI CCRM

E260w2
24. 04. 2008
0 views

E260w2

tour
29. 02. 2008
0 views

tour

Invisible Forces 2002
30. 04. 2008
0 views

Invisible Forces 2002

yurova
02. 05. 2008
0 views

yurova

IBsummary
22. 02. 2008
0 views

IBsummary

1 frday04
02. 05. 2008
0 views

1 frday04

HU CC FDM 07v1
24. 03. 2008
0 views

HU CC FDM 07v1

hermes 20 09 win
29. 01. 2008
0 views

hermes 20 09 win

ALI
14. 04. 2008
0 views

ALI

milbury
25. 01. 2008
0 views

milbury

Moira Chan Yeung FRE PPT
15. 01. 2008
0 views

Moira Chan Yeung FRE PPT

MENOPAUSElectureforW HAW
03. 03. 2008
0 views

MENOPAUSElectureforW HAW

capetocape intro
02. 04. 2008
0 views

capetocape intro

335 shrinked sfs 101 powerpoint
22. 01. 2008
0 views

335 shrinked sfs 101 powerpoint

ReuseDisp
22. 01. 2008
0 views

ReuseDisp

TWPC FINAL WEB
15. 04. 2008
0 views

TWPC FINAL WEB

taking forward seg profile
25. 02. 2008
0 views

taking forward seg profile

4th NSA GBM S06
11. 01. 2008
0 views

4th NSA GBM S06

calc prob Solv jeopardy
11. 03. 2008
0 views

calc prob Solv jeopardy

Pranay Sinha
04. 02. 2008
0 views

Pranay Sinha