shaver flight

Information about shaver flight

Published on January 15, 2008

Author: Panfilo

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Slide2:  1. The Emergence of Optimism Go to bed Dear; you'll feel better in the morning. When the sun comes Out you'll want to play. Yes, perhaps; you never know when Rain could appear out of nowhere. Steady, now. Splish, splosh, that's water I hear. Don't slip lose your grip Careful, now the ceiling dips low Aren't you glad you're not alone? Slide your hand against the side— Don’t despair It's like a maze, you'll find your way. A thousand years are like a day When you look back on it all.[1] [1] Ps 90:4; 2Pet 3:8; Rev 20:5 Slide3:  How wretched a sense, sight Wrecks imagination, Dashes dreams upon rocks; A useless thing for mud-splashed eyes Unlike mine. Can you see? No can you really See?[1] Come out and play. [1] John 9:6-12; Rom 8:24-25; Heb 11:1 Slide4:  Thirteen years of my life are gone (that doesn’t give him long to live) Those barren fields were once my home (we drove past the forests bark-stripped, further away from the blistering core) Melted away, Chornobyl! (he went bald young his face has blotches) We all stand up and sing a song: I’m so glad you came to save us[1] [1] “Lord I Lift Your Name on High” by Rick Founds Slide5:  We all worked at an ice-cream shop. I came late the day I was new And you showed me the pictures you’d brought Of your grandson. You smiled so vibrant, so content. All you needed that day was those pictures. The sun is rising, The air is fresh. It’s a good day for the climb. Throw me your rope, let’s go. And we’ll sing “You were meant for me, and I was meant for you.”[1] [1] Lyrics (song by Jewel) Slide6:  2. A View of Languor and the Arrival of Exigency Late in the old town with withered green, the dusk Above and darkness through, ghosts wander and there’s a chance that all May sleep their life away, month by month as the Eagles come and steal their green, their brightest green and Carry it off to add to their nests, to make friendly the crags Overlooking the town where the people sleep, their hands Under their pillows, frozen, as Rooftop jumping, I watch the scene, I watch day to day As the people sleep, and none will change, and Ghosts, shadows, walk the streets, pace the porches or gaze through the windows Evenings as the sun goes down and watch the eagles nestle their young Under their wings, far away, barely seen.[1] Sounds of settling cloak the burnt red, the unnoticed majesty in Lapis lagoons, Even as no more words come to me, and I wonder, what does it mean to be alive? [1] See Scout’s description of Maycomb in To Kill A Mockingbird; also, Shakespeare’s Macbeth “To-morrow, and to-morrow, and to-morrow / Creeps in this petty pace from day to day…Life’s but a walking shadow; a poor player” Slide7:  Leaves clutter the streets and there is no one to crunch them; ‘Afore long they will all die, for there is no one to Move them. Yet the ghosts stay as if Expecting—yet the people sleep on, I can see them, restless, Quiet—the wait of a Rose.[1] Until the long delayed and always expected comes, In deep slumber they remain.[2] That they wait Only makes sense (perhaps Theseus lives), for they’d have no other reason to Stay sleeping rather than dead. Suddenly—an Eastward wind starts to blow and the streets start to show, Eeeeee sound the ghosts, or perhaps Tis the wind, and the people start to stir—a Door opens and a window cracks and Rose calls to her neighbor on Étage deux, “Sont tous vos rois toujours dans le rang arrière? Ma Foi, mais il a été longtemps!”[3] “But yes, too many winters have we been In this town, too long have we seen[4]—now we’re blind, with new Eyes—nothing comes of nothing, we lose nothing”[5] It is time[6] And the streets are clear, And the ghosts no more, And an eagle takes me home And east winds through the crags roar. [1]Referring to Briar Rose (Sleeping Beauty) [2]Williams’ The Glass Menagerie “[H]e is the long delayed but always expected something that we live for.” Tom, speaking of the gentleman caller. [3]“Are all of your kings still in the back row? My faith, but it’s been ages!” Reference to The Catcher in the Rye. [4]Ethan Frome. “Guess he’s been in Starkfield too many winters.” [5]Shakespeare’s King Lear. “Nothing can come of nothing.” [6]The first letters of each line say, “L'âme courageuse. L'âme qui ose et défie.“ in English, “The brave soul. The soul that dares and defies.” This is a quote from The Awakening. Mademoiselle Reisz says it to Edna Pontellier when E.P. asks what she means by ‘the courageous soul.’ Slide8:  3. Lamentation[1] Never shall I forget that nocturnal silence, Nay, I shall not forget those moments, Those now everlasting moments…[2] Olivet sweeps the streets Ragged shoes on her feet She has no food to eat Blows her hands to keep heat[3] Bleak Blows the wind House lights go dim Sweep Sweep the streets I dine tonight on trout and wine Trout à la seule, I tip my glass[4] Hear the wind blow past Outside Glance, as the flicker snatches my eye Candle in the glass[5] I gulp it down Away out in the woods, she can’t dream for sleepin’ And the Oooooo wants to tell her Somethin’s on its mind If she’d at least sleepwalk maybe she’d find it Maybe it could make her understand[6] Not even the children weep Anymore.[7] [1] Used dryly. [2] From Night, by Elie Wiesel. A rewording of his description/adding on of my thought. “Never shall I forget that nocturnal silence which deprived me, for all eternity, of the desire to live. Never shall I forget those moments which murdered my God and my soul and turned my dreams to dust.” [3] “Olivet” is meant to call “Oliver” to mind, as in Oliver Twist. [4] “Seule” means “alone” in French. [5] Macbeth. “And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death. Out, out, brief candle!” [6] References to The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (“Then away out in the woods I heard that kind of a sound that a ghost makes when it wants to tell about something that’s on its mind and can’t make itself understood”) and to The Crucible (“I cannot sleep for dreamin’; I cannot dream but I wake and walk about the house as though I’d find you comin’ through some door.”). [7] Re-wording of a quote from To Kill A Mockingbird. “I don’t know [how they could convict Tom Robinson], but they did it. They’ve done it before and they did it tonight and they’ll do it again and when they do it—seems that only children weep…” (Atticus talking to Jem) Slide9:  What good, what good, what good are my eyes?[1] A man pulls a child out of a river The torrent has mussed her hair and she shivers Clinging to him, this clean-shaven stranger Never has she felt more safe She leans back to see his face Oh, he has mud in his eyes She wipes it away A blank stare He is blind[2] Rest easy, rest easy Every night rest easy Don’t spend your life grieving A sob and a fury[3] [1] Oedipus, character of Sophocles’, says “What good were eyes to me? Nothing I could see could bring me joy.” [2] See poem 1, ref. to mud in Bible [3] Continuation of earlier quote from Huck Finn, “and so can’t rest easy in its grave, and has to go about that way every night grieving.” Also a reference to Macbeth, “…it is a tale / Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, / Signifying nothing” (emphasis mine). Slide10:  Swirling The breeze is cold “I got this way, upfront but never true.” Cheeks sting nose is numb the Sting is good, means there’s still life left in ya Granpa used to joke The woods close in but outside it’s so open “God I’m wrong, it’s just the way I am”[1] That day Tom hit Billy and I beat Tom up I didn’t know Billy had been messing with Susie. I cried that night over what I’d lost Yet what good were tears to me? And poor Tom had a black eye for a week Still he fared better than my heart The wind is blowing but the river is calm I’ll sit here Tom never shed a tear. And all our yesterdays but lead to death[2] For myself I fought, and no other[3] But now I kneel here, fall here, Head between my knees here Crashing down, any chance you hear[4] My candle has burned down. A timid knock on the door, Sir I ask for more.[5] [1] This and the immediately previous quote are from the same song [2] Macbeth, same quote as earlier in this section. “And all our yesterdays have lighted fools / The way to dusty death.” [3] Reference to Night, where Wiesel says, “Here, every man has to fight for himself and not think of anyone else. Even of his father. Here, there are no fathers, no brothers, no friends. Everyone lives and dies for himself alone.” [4] This single line is from the same song as footnote 10 [5] Oliver Twist asks for more in the novel by Charles Dickens. “Please, Sir, I want some more.” I did not capitalize the “sir” because Dickens did; I capitalized it to refer to a Christian God. Slide11:  4. A Foolish Wager[1] Drip Drip Drip Drip He does not wake as water collects, pools, trickles over his cold face. Even mighty Nile[2] has a source. Think you less of these stalactites? [1] Reference to a quote from Pensées by Blaise Pascal, “Belief is a wise wager. Granted that faith cannot be proved, what harm will come to you if you gamble on its truth and it proves false? If you gain, you gain all; if you lose, you lose nothing. Wager then, without hesitation, that He exists.” [2] The longest river in the world. Slide12:  5. The Verdict How deserted lies the city, Once so full of people![1] The dying sun illuminates its ruins. The broken faces did it once. They’ve done it before. They will Do it tonight and they’ll do it again and When they do it not even the children weep anymore In the rain there is mud and in the sun Dust Dust turns to mud and mud turns to dust And if you mix them together you get clay. Soft clay, shapeable, But it falls apart if it rains or Cracks, left in the sun Falls apart until it’s mud Or cracks until it’s dust And then there is dust, and then there is mud But no clay.[2] [1] First two lines of the book of Lamentations in the Bible. [2] Gen 1; Job 10:9; Isaiah 64:8; Jer 18:6; Lam 4:2; Rom 9:21 Slide13:  I do something funny. “You’re a piece of work,” my daddy tells me.[1] I giggle. [1] Shakespeare’s Hamlet. “What a piece of work is man!” Slide14:  What fools these mortals be[1] They must laugh in heaven Hell doesn’t laugh; it rejoices lost expectations [1] From A Midsummer Night’s Dream. “Lord, what fools these mortals be!” Slide15:  Anyone can be a fisherman in May,[1] But I, I fish in winter, When the ice is slick and the wind is chill And children go sledding downhill Hurry, hurry, faster, faster Change the route to avoid disaster Race and skid and see the goal To pass the test, to make it whole Again[2] If it ever was but I’m agéd, dis com bob u Lated So I fish Come thou long expected[3] [1] The Old Man and the Sea by Hemingway. [on September]. “The month when the great fish come. Anyone can be a fisherman in May” (says the old man). [2] Referring to Knowles’ A Separate Peace, when Leper says “Now I see what racing skiing is all about. It’s all right to miss seeing…all the other things when you’ve got to be in a hurry. And when you’re in a war you’ve got to be in a hurry…so I guess maybe racing skiers…were preparing it, if you see what I mean, for the future. Everything has to evolve or else it perishes… I’m almost glad this war came along. It’s like a test, isn’t it, and only the things and the people who’ve been evolving the right way survive.” [3] Hymn by Charles Wesley “Come Thou Long Expected Jesus” Slide16:  I took her hand in mine and we went Out of the ruined place,[1] Out of the dusky afternoon, when Evil mixes itself with good and Befuddles the world.[2] Fear not, Carpe Diem[3] Torn in two, you cannot always be.[4] [1] Direct quote from Pip in Great Expectations, at the end of the novel as he leads Estella away. [2] The Crucible. “This is a sharp time, now, a precise time—we live no longer in the dusky afternoon when evil mixed itself with good and befuddled the world.” Danforth says this, believing that the court is doing the work of God. [3] Well-known expression in Latin. “Seize the day.” [4] In Tolkien’s The Return of the King, Frodo to Sam: “My dear Sam: You cannot always be torn in two. You will have to be one and whole for many years. You have so much to enjoy and to be and to do. Your part in the story will go on.” Slide18:  This poem was written as a parallax to The Waste Land by T.S. Eliot. I read Eliot’s poem several times and took notes on what I considered to be key emotions from each of the five sections. Then I meditated on these emotions and wrote five poems of my own, dealing with these same emotions. As I wrote, continually referring back to The Waste Land and my notes, I strove to apply Eliot’s “objective correlative”—that is, the Imagist idea that a vivid image can evoke a particular emotion and can successfully capture emotional complexities without directly stating them. I also attempted to imitate Eliot’s style in the following ways: using free verse, often shifting rhythmic and tonal patterns, inventing personalities to speak instead of using my own voice to narrate, making the images discontinuous and having the unity of the poem come from its revelations, making direct references to well-known literary and historical figures, making explicit allusions, using direct quotes from famous sources, and generally writing in a difficult way to understand thoroughly. I also kept in mind the “voice of modern consciousness,” and ventured using both the voice from Eliot’s era and a voice from our era now. Slide19:  I have read almost every work that I used as a source for an allusion or as a direct quote. The two sources I have not read are King Lear and Pensées. However, I do know the general basis of King Lear from hearing reports on it in an English class. Even though I haven’t read Pensées, (I have read a couple of other short works by Pascal) I chose to use it because the quote I came across seemed to fit perfectly as the title of section four. As I was researching Imagists and reading The Waste Land for the first few times, I took some pictures that captured at least somewhat the emotions I would be writing about. I don’t know what effect, if any, they will have on the reading of my poem, so I also am turning in a printed copy without background images. I took all of these pictures during or after Thanksgiving 2005. There is one exception—my sister snapped one of the pictures (slide three of the actual poem) for me while I was driving. Slide20:  in The Emergence of Optimism: -hope (including loss of hope and hope though there is none, or though it feels as though there is none) -cheer/lightheartedness Overriding Emotions (taken from The Waste Land) Slide21:  in A View of Languor and the Arrival of Exigency: -feelings of monotony, ennui, and being overpowered (I use the passive sense on purpose) -these emotions are replaced by readiness with the coming of urgency Slide22:  in Lamentation: -confusion -need Slide23:  in A Foolish Wager: -I saw the fourth section of Eliot’s poem as a warning. So, this section was meant to be just that—warning. Slide24:  in The Verdict: -reflection -frustration (Main Entry: frus·tra·tion Function: noun 1 : a deep chronic sense or state of insecurity and dissatisfaction arising from unresolved problems or unfulfilled needs Source: Merriam-Webster's Medical Dictionary, © 2002 Merriam-Webster, Inc.) -decision

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