Sun Earth Connection

Information about Sun Earth Connection

Published on January 9, 2008

Author: Vincenza

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Slide1:  The Sun-Earth Connection Drs. Bryan Mendez & Laura Peticolas Space Sciences Laboratory University of California at Berkeley Slide2:  What is the Sun? The Sun is a Star, but seen close-up. The Stars are other Suns but very far away. The Sun is giant ball of very hot, mostly ionized gas that shines under its own power. Slide3:  The Sun is 109 times the diameter of Earth (10 times the diameter of Jupiter). Over 1,000,000 Earths could fit inside the Sun. The Sun is 150 million kilometers away from Earth. 390 times farther away than the Moon. It takes light 8 minutes to travel to Earth from the Sun. This distance is defined as 1 Astronomical Unit (AU) Size and Distance of the Sun Sun Earth Moon Slide4:  The Multiwavelength Sun Looking at the Sun in different wavelengths of light reveals different parts of the Sun. Radio light: Wavelength = 17.6 cm See radiation from Sun’s atmosphere, Corona Slide5:  The Multiwavelength Sun Looking at the Sun in different wavelengths of light reveals different parts of the Sun. Visible light (H-α): Wavelength = 656.3 nm See radiation from layer just above Sun’s surface, Chromosphere Slide6:  The Multiwavelength Sun Looking at the Sun in different wavelengths of light reveals different parts of the Sun. Visible light (white light): Wavelength = 400-700 nm See radiation from Sun’s “surface”, Photosphere Slide7:  The Multiwavelength Sun Looking at the Sun in different wavelengths of light reveals different parts of the Sun. Extreme Ultraviolet light: Wavelength = 30.4 nm See radiation from Sun’s atmosphere, Corona Image from STEREO mission Slide8:  The Multiwavelength Sun Looking at the Sun in different wavelengths of light reveals different parts of the Sun. Extreme Ultraviolet light: Wavelength = 17.1 nm See radiation from Sun’s atmosphere, Corona Image from STEREO mission Slide9:  The Different Parts of the Sun During a total eclipse of the Sun, the very bright Photosphere is blocked and the Sun’s outer atmosphere becomes visible (in white light). We call it the Corona Spacecraft, like SOHO and STEREO, place a disk in front of their cameras to create an eclipse. They are then able to take images with a larger view of the Sun’s Corona It extends far out into the Solar System, in fact we live in it! Slide10:  The Different Parts of the Sun Core Nuclear Fusion H → He T = 15,000,000 K Radiative Zone Energy transported by light T = 10,000,000 K Convective Zone Energy transported by convection Photosphere Visible surface Far less dense than Earth’s atmosphere T = 5,800 K Sunspots: T = 4,000 K Chromosphere Thin layer above photosphere Produces most of Sun’s UV light T = 10,000 K Corona Tenuous, extends out millions of kilometers Emits X-rays T = 1,000,000 K Slide11:  The solar wind is a stream of mostly charged particles that emanate from the Sun and blow throughout the Solar System. It blows a bubble in the interstellar medium about 200 AU in diameter. The space inside this bubble is called the Heliosphere. The Solar Wind The shape of Earth’s magnetosphere is distorted by interactions with the solar wind. Slide12:  Sunspots Dark splotches on the face of the Sun. About 2,000 degrees Kelvin cooler than the average temperature on the photosphere. Appear to be dark only in comparison to their very bright surroundings. Following long-lived sunspots through time allows one to determine the rotation rate of the Sun. The Sun spins faster at the equator than at the poles. The Italian astronomer Galileo was one of the first people to use Sunspots to track the Sun’s rotation. Slide13:  The Magnetic Sun Images of the Sun in ultraviolet light reveal loops of hot ionized gas (plasma) trapped in magnetic fields above the locations of Sunspots. Sunspots are cooler because the magnetic fields do not allow plasma from the surrounding region to enter. The plasma pressure in the Sunspot drops and the temperature cools. Slide14:  The number of Sunspots and solar flares increase and decrease on an 11-year cycle. The Sun’s magnetic field becomes more and more twisted and complex from differential rotation. It finally breaks and flips every 11 years. So the total cycle is really 22 years from start to finish. The Solar Cycle Slide15:  Solar flares are enormous explosions in the atmosphere of the Sun. They release energy in the form of light, heat, and the movement of large amounts of plasma. Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs) are literally ejections of mass from the Sun’s corona. CMEs occur when large-scale magnetic fields “break” and release energy and enormous amounts of matter into space. Solar Flares & CMEs Slide16:  RHESSI Spies Solar Flares Launched: 5-Feb-2002 Science Instruments: X-ray & Gamma-Ray Imager and Spectroscope Solar flare: rapid release of a large amount of magnetic energy in the Sun’s atmosphere. Gas is heated to ~10 million degrees Kelvin (K) Radiates light across the entire EM spectrum RHESSI data has revealed electrons streaming along magnetic fields from high in the Sun’s corona and then slamming into denser gas near the surface Slide17:  CME’s are sometimes directed at Earth. It takes a few days for the material to arrive. The CME can often travel faster than the Solar Wind material creating a Shock Wave. Earth is Affected by the Sun Slide18:  Seeing the Sun in STEREO NASA’s STEREO mission has placed 2 satellites in orbit around the Sun on either side of Earth to study CME’s and their possible effects on Earth Slide19:  Energy from Solar Flares and CMEs can damage satellites and change orbits. Disrupt radio communications CME particles traveling near the speed of light threaten Astronauts. CMEs can intensify auroras (Northern and Southern Lights) Electric currents from intense aurora can cause power surges and blackouts. Electric currents from intense aurora create interesting magnetic field variations detectable on Earth. Space Weather Effects on Earth Slide20:  Magnetosphere: The magnetic field surrounding Earth Electrical currents in Earth’s molten iron outer core generate a large-scale magnetic field, similar to that of a bar magnet. Interaction with the Solar Wind compresses Earth’s magnetosphere on the dayside and elongates it on the night-side Slide21:  Two small magnetospheric funnels (cusps) are open to solar particles. 3-D rendering Sliced view Most solar wind particles are deflected around Earth’s Magnetosphere. Magnetosphere: The magnetic field surrounding Earth Slide22:  Auroras: the northern and southern lights Slide23:  Red & Green = Oxygen Pink/white (Blue & Red) = Nitrogen Electrons collide into the upper atmosphere, ionizing the gas, creating more electrons. All the electrons cause the gas to glow like neon lights or a plasma ball. 100 km (60 miles) above Earth’s surface. Auroras: caused by particles hitting the upper atmosphere. Slide24:  Particle detectors and magnetic and electric field sensors help FAST to study how auroral particles are accelerated before they crash into the atmosphere. Launched in August, 1996 While spinning in its polar elliptical orbit around the Earth, FAST passes through the auroral regions located around Earth's northern and southern magnetic poles. FAST Studies the Aurorae Slide25:  Solar Wind Particles Ionosphere Particles Magnetosphere Particles Sun’s Light Particles in Earth’s Magnetosphere are made up of particles from the solar wind and Earth’s ionosphere. Solar Wind particles do not directly cause most aurorae. Most are caused by Particles in Earth’s Magnetosphere. Auroras: Slide26:  Aurora ovals are always present. Cusp Aurora South Oval North Oval Both Ovals Images on the left are from the IMAGE satellite. Image on the right is from the Polar Satellite. Auroras: form an oval around the North and South Magnetic Poles Slide27:  Substorm: A pattern that the oval moves through in time from a thin, quiet oval to an expanding oval (growth phase), to (onset of) a dynamic oval that expands/thickens (break-up or expansion phase), to a recovery back to the thin oval (recovery phase) Auroral Substorms Slide28:  When a CME passes Earth, it can “drag” the magnetic tail far out into space. Stretched magnetic lines can break and then reconnect into a different shape. Electrons, guided by the magnetic field, speed up towards Earth and enhance auroras. CMEs can create Geomagnetic Substorms Slide29:  Chris VenHaus, Wisconsin Nov. 20 Brian Whittaker 36,000 feet above Iceland from a airplane Nov. 12th Chris Schur, Arizona Nov. 20 Eric Honeycutt, North Carolina, Nov. 20 From http://science.nasa.gov/spaceweather/aurora/gallery_01nov03.html Connie Corbett, Napa Valley, California Nov. 20 Ulrike Haug, Alaska, Nov. 15 The Auroras of Nov. 2003 Slide30:  THEMIS: with 5 satellites and many ground-based stations, will learn more about dynamic aurora and the magnetosphere. Magnetic Reconnection Model 1. Magnetic storm starts at 20 Earth Radii 2. Effects propagate to Current Disruption Region 3. Substorms and aurora are triggered Current Disruption Model 1. Substorms start in the Current Disruption Region 2. Aurora are triggered on Earth Effects then propagate tailward 3. Reconnection is triggered Slide31:  THEMIS launches Feb. 15

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