training docs

Information about training docs

Published on January 21, 2008

Author: Susann

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Using HPCS III to Guide Instruction :  Using HPCS III to Guide Instruction Current or Past Initiatives Self System:  Current or Past Initiatives Self System 3R’s Relevance Relationships General Learner Outcomes #2 Resiliency CSSS Current or Past Initiatives Metacognitive System:  Current or Past Initiatives Metacognitive System Rubrics Self-assessment General Learner Outcomes #1 #4 #5 #6 Reading Strategies Problem Solving Strategies Brain Research Current or Past Initiatives Cognitive System:  Current or Past Initiatives Cognitive System 3R’s Rigor General Learner Outcomes #3 #6 HCPS III Bloom’s Higher Order Thinking Skills Gilford’s Structure of Intellect Homework from Day 1:  Homework from Day 1 Reflect and jot-down Where do the taxonomy and taxonomic levels fit into the big picture of the system of standards? How are the 3 systems of Marzano’s taxonomy (self, meta-cognitive, cognitive) related to the DOE system of standards and other initiatives? Purpose of this Session:  Purpose of this Session Learn to create/adapt existing instructional activities or assessment tasks so that they are aligned with HCPS III. Overview of the Session:  Overview of the Session Elements of HCPS III Developing tasks by adapting existing activities Steps for adapting tasks Developing tasks by adapting Sample Performance Assessments in HCPS III Developing task-specific rubrics Types of rubrics Big Ideas:  Big Ideas Assessment tasks can be created from existing activities or from the Sample Performance Assessments that are part of HCPS III There are specific steps teachers can take to adapt existing tasks to align with HCPS III More Big Ideas:  More Big Ideas The rubrics that are part of HCPS III are designed to reflect what the standards writers thought was the most important aspect of performance for students to demonstrate 8 different focuses of performance are included in HCPS III More Big Ideas:  More Big Ideas The rubrics in HCPS III can be used to develop task specific rubrics for tasks that are aligned with the benchmarks Benchmark maps can be used to develop tasks that address more than one benchmark What’s in HCPS III?:  What’s in HCPS III? Activity: The Elements of HCPS III:  Activity: The Elements of HCPS III Review the example from HCPS III included in the handout. Notice that the labels for the various parts have been left blank. Read the definitions that follow the HCPS III example and place the appropriate label in each of the blanks. Definitions:  Definitions Strand = themes or “Big Ideas” that organize standards Standard = a broad statement of what a student needs to know or be able to do Topic = organizes the benchmarks into related ideas Benchmark = a specific statement of what a student should know or be able to do (related to the topic) at a specific grade level or grade level cluster More Definitions:  More Definitions Rubric = a description of levels of performance in relation to a benchmark Sample Performance Assessment = a generalized description of how a student might demonstrate significant aspects of the benchmark Benchmark Map = document created by OCISS which illustrates benchmarks clustered by quarters with accompanying major understandings and big ideas Developing Tasks:  Developing Tasks Consider … content of the benchmark level of difficulty of the benchmark expected level of performance Creating Tasks from Sample Performance Assessments in HCPS III:  Creating Tasks from Sample Performance Assessments in HCPS III Example 1A: Task from SPA:  Example 1A: Task from SPA Example 1B: Task from SPA:  Example 1B: Task from SPA Example 1C: Task from SPA:  Example 1C: Task from SPA Example 2: Task from SPA:  Example 2: Task from SPA Example 3: Task from SPA:  Example 3: Task from SPA Example 4: Task from SPA:  Example 4: Task from SPA Example 5: Task from SPA:  Example 5: Task from SPA Example 6: Task from SPA:  Example 6: Task from SPA Example 7: Task from SPA:  Example 7: Task from SPA Example 8: Task from SPA:  Example 8: Task from SPA Example 9: Task from SPA:  Example 9: Task from SPA Example 10: Task from SPA:  Example 10: Task from SPA Example 11: Task from SPA:  Example 11: Task from SPA Example 12: Task from SPA:  Example 12: Task from SPA Example 13: Task from SPA:  Example 13: Task from SPA Example 14: Task from SPA:  Example 14: Task from SPA Example 15: Task from SPA:  Example 15: Task from SPA Example 16: Task from SPA:  Example 16: Task from SPA Example 17: Task from SPA – Grade Span Benchmarks:  Example 17: Task from SPA – Grade Span Benchmarks Example 1: Task from Benchmark:  Example 1: Task from Benchmark Activity: Creating a Task from a Sample Performance Assessment:  Activity: Creating a Task from a Sample Performance Assessment Work in groups of 2 or 3 Select a benchmark from the samples provided Develop a specific task to address the benchmark, using the Sample Performance Assessment or the benchmark as a starting point SPA to Specific Task:  SPA to Specific Task Sample 1:  Sample 1 Sample 2:  Sample 2 Sample 3:  Sample 3 Sample 4:  Sample 4 Combining Benchmarks:  Combining Benchmarks Steps for Adaptation:  Steps for Adaptation Determine if the content of the activity is addressed by a benchmark in HCPS III If no, the activity is likely not useful If yes, proceed to the next step Determine if the level of difficulty of the activity matches the level of difficulty of the selected benchmark and the focus of performance of the general rubric If no, revise the task to match the level of difficulty of the benchmark and/or focus of performance of the general rubric If yes, proceed to the next step Develop task-specific rubric Slide46:  Flow Chart for Developing a Task from an Existing Activity Example 1: Developing a Task from an Existing Activity – Step 1:  Example 1: Developing a Task from an Existing Activity – Step 1 Original Activity Groups show and describe their maps/pictorials of each region. Students use question starters such as: What if they discovered fire sooner? Why did they settle in cold climates? Who might…, How could…Where could… etc. Step 1: Is the content addressed in HCPS III? Yes – Compare the physical and human characteristics of different communities and regions (Topic: Places and Regions; Benchmark SS.3.7.2) Example 1: Developing a Task from an Existing Activity – Step 2:  Example 1: Developing a Task from an Existing Activity – Step 2 Original Activity Groups show and describe their maps/pictorials of each region. Students use question starters such as: What if they discovered fire sooner? Why did they settle in cold climates? Who might…, How could…Where could… etc Step 2: Is the activity at the same difficulty level as the benchmark and does it have the same focus of performance as the general rubric for the benchmark? Difficulty Level Match:  Difficulty Level Match Difficulty of the benchmark Compare the physical and human characteristics of different communities and regions Difficulty of the activity Groups show and describe their maps/pictorials of each region (early Africa, Eurasia, and the Americas). Students use question starters such as: What if they discovered fire sooner? Why did they settle in cold climates? Who might…, How could…Where could… etc. Are these difficulty levels the same? Slide50:  Discuss with a partner how the teacher might modify the activity so that it matches the difficulty level of the benchmark. Activity: Adapting Existing Activities:  Activity: Adapting Existing Activities Work in small grade-level or content groups Select an activity from a textbook or other source (e.g., HCPS II) Follow the steps to determine whether the activity can be used “as is” to address a benchmark in your content area or revise the activity as necessary Examples of Existing Activities:  Examples of Existing Activities As part of language study, students may compile lists—either by class or individually—of acronyms and initialisms. They seem to be in increasing use in the world of electronic media and popular culture. You might also ask them to reflect on what communication would be like without acronyms and initialisms. (grade 8) Ask students to look for posters in and out of school and study the art work and the kinds of information on a poster. Then have them create their own poster for a school event, e.g., craft fair, fund raiser, food drive, “Jump for Heart,” etc. They are to add posters on their list of “My Writing.” (grade 1) Examples of Existing Activities:  Examples of Existing Activities Explore and describe ways to include physical activities into a lifetime physical activity plan. Explain how selected personal goals and level of participation relate to a healthy lifestyle. Develop strategies for maintaining and adjusting goals. (PE, grade 10) Have pairs compare, share, and read each others’ notes on rules. Talk about similarities and differences. Ask children to work in groups to write rules. (SS, grade 3) Examples of Existing Activities:  Examples of Existing Activities Work with a partner to create and improvise characters using costume pieces randomly selected. Describe areas that need improvement. Use the assessment form and rubrics developed by the group to self-assess. (Drama, grade 5) Below is a fruit punch recipe that will be used for the 8th grade luau. If each serving is ¾ of a cup, how many cups of syrup do you need to make 360 servings? If syrup is sold only in gallon containers, how many gallons of syrup would you need to buy to make 360 servings? Syrup 3 cups Water 4 cups Lemon Lime Soda 2 cups (Math, grade 8) 2 Minute Write:  2 Minute Write Reflect on what you have learned about adapting existing activities to align with benchmarks. Record the important ideas you want to remember. Rubrics :  Rubrics General Rubric:  General Rubric Benchmark: SC.6.6.4: Describe and give examples of different types of energy waves Types of Rubrics:  Types of Rubrics Holistic Analytic Task Specific General Focus of Performance :  Focus of Performance 1. Consistency Difficulty Error Level of detail Significance of Detail Quality Speed and Fluency Variety Focus provides the means for distinguishing between rubric levels :  Focus provides the means for distinguishing between rubric levels Activity: Getting to Know Rubric Types:  Activity: Getting to Know Rubric Types Form groups of six Count off 1 to 6 in your group Go to your assigned expert table; take your handout with you Read and discuss your assigned information Prepare information to share with your home group Share information with home group (3-5 minutes per expert) Rubric Types:  Rubric Types Consistency Difficulty Error Level of Detail Significance of Detail Quality Speed and Fluency Variety (The above are included in the handout, “Rubric Types”) Rubrics with Consistency as the Focus:  Rubrics with Consistency as the Focus Used to assess if knowledge and/or skill can be used over time and/or in variety of situations Associated with skills or processes Implies numerous observations and not single performance Consistency Rubric:  Consistency Rubric Rubrics with Error as the Focus :  Rubrics with Error as the Focus Applied to knowledge or skill with definite right or wrong answer Rubric can establish degree of proficiency by significance of error made or overall number of mistakes made Math or World Languages would use this type of rubric Error Rubric:  Error Rubric Error Rubric:  Error Rubric Rubrics with Difficulty as the Focus :  Rubrics with Difficulty as the Focus Used in conjunction with well-designed taxonomy of educational objectives Used to determine level of difficulty appropriate for mastery of the content Used to characterize nature of difficulty above and below desired level of performance Taxonomic Rubric (Difficulty):  Taxonomic Rubric (Difficulty) Rubrics with Level of Detail as the Focus :  Rubrics with Level of Detail as the Focus Allow teachers to assess the depth of student knowledge about a particular topic Work well on content with many layers of information Teacher determines desired degree of knowledge on topic in order to express expectations for proficient performance Level of Detail Rubric:  Level of Detail Rubric Rubrics with Significance of Detail as the Focus :  Rubrics with Significance of Detail as the Focus Used when content is complex, containing much information, some of which may not be as important Focus on significant relationships within a concept, rather than details Not effective for benchmarks with items of equal importance or narrow topics Significance of Detail Rubric:  Significance of Detail Rubric Rubrics with Quality as the Focus :  Rubrics with Quality as the Focus Used when student is expected to explain, design, produce, or create a product with no easily discernable “right” answer Should be flexible and accurately describe the characteristics or content of the desired product Make use of adjectives to describe levels of performance Quality Rubric:  Quality Rubric Rubrics with Speed and Fluency as the Focus :  Rubrics with Speed and Fluency as the Focus Most appropriate when the speed of recall and automaticity of a skill are of primary importance Benchmarks most suited for fluency usually focus on basic knowledge and skills in math and reading Used in observation, one-on-one assessment settings Speed & Fluency Rubric:  Speed & Fluency Rubric Rubrics with Variety as the Focus :  Rubrics with Variety as the Focus Appropriate when there is a set of ideas commonly associated with a topic or a variety of contexts associated with a topic that students should know Not useful for benchmarks which explicitly state a very limited list of items Variety Rubric:  Variety Rubric One focus or many?:  One focus or many? Often the rubric focuses on only one aspect of performance related to the benchmark, even if more than one could be identified. In some cases, multiple traits appear in the rubric to capture a number of critical aspects of performance related to the benchmark. Example 1: Mixed Model:  Example 1: Mixed Model Example 2: Mixed Model:  Example 2: Mixed Model Example 3: Mixed Model:  Example 3: Mixed Model Example 4:Mixed Model:  Example 4:Mixed Model Activity: Focus of Content Area Rubrics:  Activity: Focus of Content Area Rubrics Work in small groups with others who teach the same content Select one standard For each associated benchmark, determine the focus of the rubric (e.g., quality, significance of detail) Revisiting Example 1: Developing a Task from an Existing Activity – Step 2:  Revisiting Example 1: Developing a Task from an Existing Activity – Step 2 Original Activity Groups show and describe their maps/pictorials of each region. Students use question starters such as: What if they discovered fire sooner? Why did they settle in cold climates? Who might…, How could…Where could… etc. Step 2: Is the activity at the same difficulty level as the benchmark and does it have the same focus of performance as the general rubric for the benchmark? Revisiting Example 1:  Revisiting Example 1 Original Activity Groups show and describe their maps/pictorials of each region. Students use question starters such as: What if they discovered fire sooner? Why did they settle in cold climates? Who might…, How could…Where could… etc. Social Studies Benchmark 3.7.2 Compare the physical and human characteristics of different communities and regions General Rubric for Benchmark SS.3.7.2:  General Rubric for Benchmark SS.3.7.2 Slide91:  Discuss with a partner how the teacher might modify the activity so that it matches the difficulty level of the benchmark and the focus of performance of the general benchmark rubric. General vs. Specific Task Rubrics:  General vs. Specific Task Rubrics Benchmark: SC.6.6.4: Describe and give examples of different types of energy waves General to Specific Rubric:  General to Specific Rubric Benchmark SS.8.3.8: Examine the impact of the Seneca Falls Convention and major abolitionists, including Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison Example 5: Task from SPA – Grade Span Benchmarks:  Example 5: Task from SPA – Grade Span Benchmarks PE Example: Rubrics for Each Task from Grade Band Benchmarks:  PE Example: Rubrics for Each Task from Grade Band Benchmarks Activity: Writing Task Specific Rubrics:  Activity: Writing Task Specific Rubrics Work with a partner. Read the original SPA and rubric for the example on the next page of your handout. Read the specific task on the page that follows it. Develop a task specific rubric for the task Original SPA & Rubric:  Original SPA & Rubric Adapted Task & Rubric:  Adapted Task & Rubric Combining Benchmarks:  Combining Benchmarks Teachers struggling to teach an overloaded curriculum!:  Teachers struggling to teach an overloaded curriculum! Slide102:  TOPIC Summarizing the Day Slide103:  My self-system has gone on overload!

Related presentations


Other presentations created by Susann

Athletic Footwear Industry
31. 03. 2008
0 views

Athletic Footwear Industry

radioactivity 1
07. 02. 2008
0 views

radioactivity 1

Africa Unit 3
02. 04. 2008
0 views

Africa Unit 3

Market Research
03. 03. 2008
0 views

Market Research

module 1 intro
08. 05. 2008
0 views

module 1 intro

zly
07. 05. 2008
0 views

zly

031016 inhale montreal
02. 05. 2008
0 views

031016 inhale montreal

new leg
02. 05. 2008
0 views

new leg

JM UWA Luncheon Oct2007
30. 04. 2008
0 views

JM UWA Luncheon Oct2007

Tutorial
24. 04. 2008
0 views

Tutorial

NSW China Briefing
22. 04. 2008
0 views

NSW China Briefing

Weber Fall06
18. 04. 2008
0 views

Weber Fall06

SharksPP
17. 04. 2008
0 views

SharksPP

Dennill Managing Your Risk
09. 01. 2008
0 views

Dennill Managing Your Risk

AAS Presentation
10. 01. 2008
0 views

AAS Presentation

GANG Powerpoint
11. 01. 2008
0 views

GANG Powerpoint

885
15. 01. 2008
0 views

885

Chapt 05
16. 01. 2008
0 views

Chapt 05

Class11
09. 01. 2008
0 views

Class11

Mercantilism
18. 01. 2008
0 views

Mercantilism

ppe p sp
20. 01. 2008
0 views

ppe p sp

eukaryoticorgs
22. 01. 2008
0 views

eukaryoticorgs

LimitedBrandsPresent ation
04. 02. 2008
0 views

LimitedBrandsPresent ation

MLA outreach presentation
15. 01. 2008
0 views

MLA outreach presentation

CenturyTheatre Ad Sept06 gg
15. 01. 2008
0 views

CenturyTheatre Ad Sept06 gg

LutzWalter
22. 01. 2008
0 views

LutzWalter

secondary aluminum
12. 02. 2008
0 views

secondary aluminum

2 3 Ben Sekamatte
25. 01. 2008
0 views

2 3 Ben Sekamatte

Clara Qualizza
19. 01. 2008
0 views

Clara Qualizza

Session 4 Oper vs Aux
28. 01. 2008
0 views

Session 4 Oper vs Aux

Ch5 6 10 14
29. 01. 2008
0 views

Ch5 6 10 14

Rites of Passage
29. 01. 2008
0 views

Rites of Passage

Jonah Presentation
30. 01. 2008
0 views

Jonah Presentation

tjea
07. 02. 2008
0 views

tjea

firesafety
07. 02. 2008
0 views

firesafety

Wiriya Suwannet
10. 01. 2008
0 views

Wiriya Suwannet

s Oceans
13. 02. 2008
0 views

s Oceans

Freeman
20. 02. 2008
0 views

Freeman

Forage Diseases
27. 02. 2008
0 views

Forage Diseases

SlaneP constraints
22. 01. 2008
0 views

SlaneP constraints

EPD2 Present and Future
28. 02. 2008
0 views

EPD2 Present and Future

INSOMNIA DrJeanGrenier Nov 2007
28. 02. 2008
0 views

INSOMNIA DrJeanGrenier Nov 2007

SAAS Gianessi
28. 01. 2008
0 views

SAAS Gianessi

5th Grade FCAT Review
14. 03. 2008
0 views

5th Grade FCAT Review

talent engine discussion guide
16. 03. 2008
0 views

talent engine discussion guide

Lecture14 TheEarth
11. 03. 2008
0 views

Lecture14 TheEarth

GEO205 powerpoint 12
27. 03. 2008
0 views

GEO205 powerpoint 12

Parasitology Basic 07
28. 03. 2008
0 views

Parasitology Basic 07

world geography
15. 04. 2008
0 views

world geography

Irwin
16. 04. 2008
0 views

Irwin

BuildingWordnets
05. 02. 2008
0 views

BuildingWordnets

Douglas Morgan
16. 01. 2008
0 views

Douglas Morgan

Wien
05. 03. 2008
0 views

Wien

NSO 2007
14. 01. 2008
0 views

NSO 2007

GeneralOutreachKansas
29. 01. 2008
0 views

GeneralOutreachKansas

Rita Tucker
25. 01. 2008
0 views

Rita Tucker

Bob Moseley Kawagebo
05. 02. 2008
0 views

Bob Moseley Kawagebo

michigan0314b
15. 01. 2008
0 views

michigan0314b

Canning Fruits
06. 02. 2008
0 views

Canning Fruits

English Labofa EGO Nordic
05. 03. 2008
0 views

English Labofa EGO Nordic

SlidesWithNotes
14. 02. 2008
0 views

SlidesWithNotes

GMkk
24. 01. 2008
0 views

GMkk

20030909152346 EVI
13. 01. 2008
0 views

20030909152346 EVI

07nrm
22. 01. 2008
0 views

07nrm

praca5
03. 03. 2008
0 views

praca5

majingweili
14. 04. 2008
0 views

majingweili

Module3Presentation
25. 02. 2008
0 views

Module3Presentation

Jones NDDA
20. 01. 2008
0 views

Jones NDDA

Thornton CreatingAClimate
17. 01. 2008
0 views

Thornton CreatingAClimate

FirstHalfStudyGuide
15. 02. 2008
0 views

FirstHalfStudyGuide