WDHSJuly505

Information about WDHSJuly505

Published on February 20, 2008

Author: Janelle

Source: authorstream.com

Content

Adolescent Literature and Libraries Presented by Sheila B. Anderson Dover (DE) Public Library Director and Clarion University (PA) Instructor:  Adolescent Literature and Libraries Presented by Sheila B. Anderson Dover (DE) Public Library Director and Clarion University (PA) Instructor Adolescent Stages:  Adolescent Stages Who am I? Who was I? - Serving Older Teens p. 50 and p. 81-82 - Extreme Teens: Library Services to Nontraditional Young Adults p. 1 Who are you? Who were you? Adolescent Stages:  Adolescent Stages Movie: Book: TV Show: Musician: Hobbies: Food: Hangouts Adolescent Stages:  Adolescent Stages BELOIT COLLEGE MINDSET LIST FOR THE CLASS OF 2006 Beloit College distributes the Mindset List to its faculty and staff as an indicator of how entering 17 and 18 year olds see the world differently from their professors. Most students entering college this fall were born in 1984. 1. A Southerner has always been President of the United States. 2. Richard Burton, Ricky Nelson and Truman Capote have always been dead. 3. South Africa's official policy of apartheid has not existed during their lifetime. 4. Cars have always had eye-level rear stop lights, CD players, and air bags. 5. We have always been able to choose our long distance carriers. 6. Weather reports have always been available 24-hours a day on television. 7. The "evil empire" has moved from Moscow to a setting in some distant galaxy. 8. "Big Brother" is merely a television show. 9. Cyberspace has always existed. 10. Bruce Springsteen's new hit, Born in the USA, could have been played to celebrate their birth. 11. Barbie has always had a job. 12. Telephone bills have always been totally incomprehensible. 13. Prom dresses have always come in basic black. 14. A "Hair Band" is some sort of fashion accessory. 15. George Foreman has always been a barbecue grill salesman 16. Afghanistan has always been a front page story. 17. There has always been an heir to the heir to the British throne. 18. They have no recollection of Connie Chung or Geraldo Rivera as serious journalists. 19. Peter Jennings, Dan Rather, and Tom Brokaw have always anchored the evening news. 20. China has always been a market-based reforming regime http://www.beloit.edu/~pubaff/releases/mindset_2006.html Adolescent Stages:  Adolescent Stages Early: “Hormone Hell,” 11-14, changing bodies, friends become important, parents are aliens, egocentric, self-conscious, questions about sex Middle: “Years of Limbo,” 15-16, self discovery, more mature relationships, busy with athletics and academics, cognitive skills, striving for independence, natural struggle against authority Late: “Preparation for Adulthood,” 17-19, almost self-reliant, making important decisions about future, forming stable sexual relationships Adolescent Stages:  Adolescent Stages EARLY: best time for programming, have materials on sex and changing bodies, provide space where they can hang out, provide positive adult interaction MIDDLE: Library is a low priority, rushing to do homework, programs relating to activities such as prom and homework LATE: Information on job market, colleges, finance, study guides, dorm life, employment, military Adolescent Stages :  Adolescent Stages Biological: puberty, changes in self-image, greater need for privacy, sexual impulses, some feel attractive and others feel self-conscious Cognitive: sophisticated thinking, hypothetical and abstract thinking, abilities to plan, argue, and solve problems Social: new rights and privileges, some excited about choices and other scared, strong socialization for stereotypic gender roles, autonomy including changes in political and religious thinking, cross-sex friendships and dating, sexual identity Adolescent Stages:  Adolescent Stages “Being Teen Aware in Delaware: Introducing Author Lara M. Zeises,” Voice of Youth Advocates, February 2005, pp.444-445. Bringing Up the Bones: Bridget, 18, has already experienced love, is almost self-reliant, and is taking a year off before attending college Contents Under Pressure: Lucy, 14, a high school freshman, is at the end of her early adolescent years, is becoming independent from her parents Adolescent Stages:  Adolescent Stages Library: reading and research are priorities, programs, a lot like school with rules and adults, lots of limits such as checking out videos and computer use Teens: reading is sometimes a low priority, research can be frustrating, competition for time, tired of rules, natural to test limits Adolescent Stages:  Adolescent Stages Professional Organizations:  Professional Organizations Young Adult Library Services Association (YALSA) American Association of School Librarians (AASL) Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) All three are divisions of the American Library Association (ALA) at www.ala.org Professional Organizations:  Professional Organizations Michael L. Printz Award Excellence in young adult literature Best Books for Young Adults Includes fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and biographies Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults Different genres each year Outstanding Books for the College Bound and Lifelong Learners Life of fiction, nonfiction, biographies, drama, and poetry for college preparation and lifelong learning Alex Awards Adults books that will be enjoyed by young adults Selected Audiobooks Based upon quality of recordings, strength in conveying the story, author recognition, and timeliness of the subject matter Selected DVDs and Videos for Young Adults Based upon technical merit, content, and interest to young adults Teens’ Top Ten Where teens choose the books Professional Organizations :  Professional Organizations Assembly on Literature for Adolescents (ALAN) of the National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) ALAN Workshop in Pittsburgh on November 21st – 22nd 2005 with forty YA authors as speakers and panelists http://www.alan-ya.org/ Professional Organizations :  Professional Organizations International Reading Association www.reading.org Professional Organizations:  Professional Organizations New Jersey Library Association (NJLA) Young Adult Services Section Garden State Teen Book Awards www.njla.org Educational Media Association of NJ http://www.emanj.org Professional Resources: Journals:  Professional Resources: Journals ALAN Review (ALAN) American Libraries (ALA) Booklist (ALA) English Journal (NCTE) Journal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy (IRA) Library Media Connection (Linworth Publishing) Reading Today (IRA) School Library Journal (Reed) Voice of Youth Advocates (Scarecrow Press) Young Adult Library Services (YALSA of ALA) Adolescent Literature: Characteristics:  Adolescent Literature: Characteristics Written from the viewpoint of teens Fast-paced Includes a variety of genres and subjects Includes characters from different ethnic and cultural groups Portrays emotions and topics that are important to teens such as: Acquiring more mature social skills Accepting changes in body and physique Preparing for sex, marriage, and parenthood Selecting and preparing for an occupation Developing ethical standards Robert Havinghurst, Developmental Tasks and Education (McKay, 1972) in Literature for Today’s Young Adults, 7th edition, 2005, Donelson & Nilsen Adolescent Literature: History 1950s – 1970s :  Adolescent Literature: History 1950s – 1970s 1951: Catcher in the Rye by Salinger 1967: The Outsiders by Hinton 1968: The Pigman by Zindel 1972: Dinker Hocker Shoots Smack! By Kerr 1973: Summer of My German Soldier by Greene 1974: The Chocolate War by Cormier 1975: Forever by Blume 1976: Are You in the House Alone? By Peck 1977: I Am the Cheese by Cormier 1978: Killing Mr. Griffin by Duncan 1979: Tex by Hinton Adolescent Literature: History 1980s – 1995:  Adolescent Literature: History 1980s – 1995 1980: Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Adams 1982: Annie On My Mind by Garden 1987: Crazy Horse Electric Game by Crutcher 1989: Weetzie Bat by Block 1992: Somewhere in the Darkness by Myers 1993: Make Lemonade by Wolff 1995: Like Sisters on the Homefront by Williams-Garcia Adolescent Literature: History 1996-2000:  Adolescent Literature: History 1996-2000 1996: Rats Saw God by Thomas 1997: Whistle Me Home by Wersba 1998: Killer’s Cousin by Werlin 1999: Monster by Myers 2000: Kit’s Wilderness by Almond 2000: Stuck in Neutral by Trueman Adolescent Literature: History 2001-2005:  Adolescent Literature: History 2001-2005 2001: Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants by Brachares 2001: A Step From Heaven by Na 2002: Big Mouth and Ugly Girl by Oates 2003: First Part Last by Johnson 2004: how i live now by Rosoff 2005: Rainbow Party by Ruditis 2005: Necklace of Kisses by Block Adolescent Literature: Realistic:  Adolescent Literature: Realistic Problems may include peer groups, family relationships, multiculturalism, or changing bodies “Problem novel” began in late 1960s Good realistic fiction has a believable plot, characters that come alive, and universal appeal Poor problem novels are predictable, include stereotypes and trendy topics, and are preachy Monster by Myers was the first Printz Award winner, is written as a screenplay, and involves a teen on trial for murder Adolescent Literature: Sports:  Adolescent Literature: Sports Fiction for young adults range from Jerry Spinelli’s There’s a Girl in My Hammerlock to Wrestling Sturbridge by Rich Wallace, which is heavier and more involved regarding the actual sport More sports books include information about training, expected rewards, and inevitable disappointments Hard Ball, Striking Out, and Farm Team by Will Weaver concern not only baseball, by farm life, Minnesota, parental relationships, and coping with death Chris Crutcher has successfully interwoven sports into his novels about personal development Nonfiction sports books include biographies about sports figures, professional athletic teams, Olympians, extreme sports, professional wrestling, and more Most sports books feature males although more female athletes have been portrayed in recent years Adolescent Literature: Romance:  Adolescent Literature: Romance Realistic fiction and problem novels often include a romantic plot Usually involve a quest of some type Appealing to teenagers because many romantic symbols relate to youthfulness and hope Teens spend a lot of time seeking true love Necessary for writers to create believable characters More same-sex romances published in last five years Typically more sexual content in love romances written by male and by male authors. Adolescent Literature: Adventure:  Adolescent Literature: Adventure Readers are attracted to the basic conflict of person against person, person against nature, and person against self Survival stories Meeting incredible odds and winning More excitement and action compared to other genres Increasing difficulty and danger Westerns are a subgenre of adventure Gary Paulsen Will Hobbs Popularity of movie Titanic and implications for publishers; Titanic Adventure by Joel Hirschhorn; Titanic: An Illustrated History by Don Lynch; Titanic: The Long Night by Diane Hoh; Remember the Titanic by Diane Hoh; SOS Titanic by Eve Bunting “Adventure stories are popular because boredom chafes at our souls and crowds out of our minds such practical concerns as safety and caution; however, the human body– at least our own– reminds us all too quickly of risk.” p. 182 or 6th edition, Donelson & Nilsen Adolescent Literature: History and Historical Fiction:  Adolescent Literature: History and Historical Fiction Historical fiction is read because people are curious about other times, places, and people, but also because we want mystery, adventure, and suspense Historical fiction includes many genres, including romance, mysteries, comedies, adventures, and realistic problem stories, but they are all set in the past Popular authors for young adults include Anne Rinaldi, Carol Matas, Carolyn Meyer, James Lincoln and Christopher Collier, and Catherine Cushman Dear America and My Name Is America series Suggestions for Evaluating Historical Fiction:  Suggestions for Evaluating Historical Fiction A good historical novel usually has: A setting that is integral to the story An authentic rendition of time, place, and people being featured An author who is so thoroughly steeped in the history of the period that he or she can be comfortably creative without making mistakes Believable characters with whom young readers can identify Evidence that even across great time spans people share similar emotions References to well-known events or people or other clues through which the reader can place the happenings in their correct historic framework Readers who come away with the feeling that they know a time or place better. It is as if they have lived in it for at least a few hours A poor historical novel may have: A story that could have happened any time or at any place. The historical setting is for visual appeal and to compensate for a weak story Anachronisms in which the author illogically mixes up people, events, speaking styles, social values, or technological developments from different time periods Awkward narrations and exposition as the author tries to teach history through characters’ conversations Oversimplification of the historical issues and a stereotyping of the “bad” and “good” guys Characters who fail to come alive as individuals having something in common with the readers. They are just stereotyped representatives of a particular period Adolescent Literature: Humor:  Adolescent Literature: Humor Humor exists in advertisements, television, movies, newspapers, radio, and on the Internet Teens may need humor even more so compared to adults Urban legends Humorous poetry Authors who include humor in books for young adults include Paula Danziger, Ellen Conford, Jerry Spinelli, Joan Bauer, Daniel Hayes, Robert Koertge, and Gordon Korman Lance M. Gentile and Merna M. McMillen (from Literature for Today’s Young Adults, Donelson and Nilsen, 2005) Ages 10-11 Literal humor, slapstick, laughing at accidents and misbehavior, sometimes mildly lewd jokes, and grossness Ages 12-13 Practical jokes, teasing, goofs, sarcasm, more lewd jokes, tongue twisters Ages 14-15 More lewd jokes, humor aimed at schools, parents, and adults in authority Age 16 and up More subtle humor, satire and parody now acceptable and preferable, witticisms/adult humor is increasingly part of their repertoire, partly because they are anxious to appear sophisticated, and partly because they are growing up I Didn’t Gamble on Finding This!:  I Didn’t Gamble on Finding This! “When we were teaching in New Jersey and our four children were young, we participated in an annual event that is unique, we think, to New Jersey. In 14 B.C. when the state came into being, God came down and created a constitution, and it was written that there should be an educational convention every year regardless of whether the state has money to run its schools. And so every November the schools in New Jersey would close for two days and 60,000 teachers would drive to Atlantic City—the only city large enough to hold all of us. One year when we were driving down the Garden State Parkway in our station wagon with our four children in the back, we heard them saying, ‘That’s a teacher car, ‘ That’s not a teacher car,’ ‘Yes, there’s a teacher car!’ In the front seat, we were saying, ‘That’s a Ford,’ ‘Well, that’s a Cadillac,’ and ‘There’s an Edsel.’ We couldn’t break the code or come up with a reason for their conjecturing. Finally, we asked: ‘How do you know when it’s a teacher car?’ Kids being kids, they condescendingly explained, ‘Isn’t it obvious? Look at their faces!’ And they were right. Teachers have grim faces. We don’t laugh enough. We don’t let kids laugh enough. Now we’re learning, and it is important to realize that humor is the one genre that appeals to non-readers, can’t readers, and won’t-readers, as well as to avid-readers. That’s why in our first two anthologies we focused on humor. It gave us an excuse to read and reread American humor going from Ben Franklin to Woody Allen. It is wonderful to find humor in literature, but there is also humor in our classrooms.” Helen S. Weiss and M. Jerry Weiss, “On the Importance of Humor,” Literature for Today’s Young Adults, Donelson and Nilsen, 7th edition, 2005, p. 163. Adolescent Literature: Mystery:  Adolescent Literature: Mystery Popular adult authors include Agatha Christie and Sue Grafton Popular authors for teens include Robert Cormier and Joan Lowery Nixon Some authors for teens may write in different genres including mysteries, such as: - The Body of Christopher Creed by Carol Plum-Ucci - The Killer’s Cousin By Nancy Werlin - When Jeff Comes Home by Catherine Atkins A mystery novel may involve detectives, police procedures, or spy thrillers Adolescent Literature: Horror:  Adolescent Literature: Horror “Support for allowing young adults to read supernatural books comes from Jeanine Basinger, chair of film studies at Wesleyan University. While her words were aimed at horror films, they apply equally well to books: ‘It never really goes away, this appetite for horror . . . We have all of these tragedies on our minds. In modern life it’s just one damn thing after another, and we seek to explain it to one another. And if there’s some experience that gives closure to it, gives an explanation or at least gives us reassurance that we’re not the only one having the scaries, it reassures us.’ “ (Lyman, Rick. “The Chills! The Thrills! The Profits,” New York Times, August 31, 1999, p. B1, Literature for Today’s Young Adults, Donelson & Nilsen, 7th edition, 2005, p. 198. Many teens like adult authors such as Lovecraft, King, and Hitchcock Popular authors and titles for teens include: - The Silver Kiss and Blood and Chocolate by Annette Curtis Klause - Companions of the Night by Vivian Vande Velde - Summer of Fear, Stranger With My Face, and The Third Eye by Lois Duncan Adolescent Literature: Science Fiction:  Adolescent Literature: Science Fiction “Science fiction is speculative fiction based on the real world, with all its ‘established facts and natural laws’ and it is not fantasy: it is legitimate– and often very tightly reasoned—speculation about the possibilities of the real world’ according to Robert A. Neinlein in”Ray Guns and Rocket Ships” in Library Journal, July 1953. Stories based on known scientific principles and possible outcomes of contemporary problems like pollution, population, and politics projected into the future for a new perspective “Soft” science fiction deals with disciplines like sociology and psychology Social criticism (Fahrenheit 451 by Bradbury) Dystopias and utopias (The Giver by Lois Lowry, Among the Hidden by Margaret Peterson Haddix) Alternative/parallel worlds that offer an opportunity to impose a new pattern on history (Man Who Was Poe by Avi) “Hard” science fiction includes stories that imaginatively project possibilities or probabilities of current technology, hardware, and theories such as: Space travel (Foundation series by Asimov, Interstellar Pig by Sleator) Space opera (Star Wars) Media tie-ins (Star Trek, X-Files) Time travel/time warp (Doomsday Book by Willis) Interaction of man and machine through virtual reality, artificial intelligence, and robotics (Ship Who Sang by McCaffrey Cyberpunk, where human nature takes precedence (Clockwork Orange by Burgess) Adolescent Literature: Fantasy:  Adolescent Literature: Fantasy Creates an imagined world in which characters and events operate within established rules; no matter how imaginative, fantasy must have a convincing reality of its own in the midst of things that cannot happen to characters with superhuman powers in unreal worlds Almost always involves magic or supernatural powers, a struggle of good and evil, and characters that mature through some type of quest “High fantasy” is set in a complete secondary world filled with imaginary beings like fairies, dragons, and unicorns, with laws set by supernatural beings, such as Middle-Earth by Tolkien “Low fantasy” is set in our more familiar world of natural laws in which non-rational happenings occur inexplicably, such as animal fantasy in Watership Down “Dark fantasy” that incorporates some horror elements such as the Darkangel trilogy by Meredith Pierce and Silver Kiss by Annette Curtis Klause Sword and sorcery fantasy such as offshoots from the game Dungeons and Dragons Animal fantasy such as the Redwall series by Jacques Time travel Resources Fantasy Literature: a Reader’s Guide edited by Neil Barron is a collection development and readers’ advisory tool Fluent in Fantasy:a Guide to Reading Interests by Diana Tixier Herald explains different types of fantasy such as sword and sorcery, saga, myth, legend, fairy tales, time travel, paranormal powers, dark fantasy, romantic fantasy, and short stories Fantasy Literature for Children and Young Adults: an Annotated Bibliography compiled by Ruth Nadelman Lynn includes an author, title, illustrator, and subject index and also breaks down types of fantasy with annotations and reviews Adolescent Literature: Picture Books:  Adolescent Literature: Picture Books “Picture books are often viewed as a type of reading that a child begins with and then moves away from. After a child is able to read independently, he or she is introduced to easy readers, chapter books, and novels. The richly illustrated picture books of childhood are left behind. Using the debate of showmanship, I argue that the sophisticated subjects and richly detailed illustrations in flashy picture books are ideal to enhance the education of young adults.” (page xvi of Literature for Today’s Young Adults, Donelson and Nilsen, 7th edition, 2005) Inner City Mother Goose by Eve Merriam: “New illustrations make this reissue of a 1962 controversial book more powerful. Merriam’s parodies are shocking because of the contrast between the supposed innocence of the nursery rhymes and the harsh realities of inner city life.” Cannibal in the Mirror by Paul Fleischman: Selections from anthropological writings are paired with photographs of twentieth-century people engaged in similar activities including marriage, recreation, and death. Making Up Megaboy by Virginia Walter and Katrina Roeckelein: When thirteen-year-old Robbie shoots an old man in a liquor store, everyone who knows the quiet, withdrawn youth struggles to understand this act of seemingly random violence. Adolescent Literature: Graphic Novels and Comic Books:  Adolescent Literature: Graphic Novels and Comic Books “Why comic books? Because kids are reading them. Do we need any other justification?” Michael R. Lavin, in “Comic books and Graphic Novels for Libraries: What to Buy,” Serials Review, Summer 98, Volume 24 Issue 2, p. 31. Encouraging non-readers to develop reading habits Costumed super-hero adventures remain the most abundant comic book form, such as Superman, Batman, and Spider-Man Other genres of comic books include romance, war, western, detective, humor, fantasy, and adventure A graphic novel is a book-length, original story told in comic book form Adolescent Literature: Magazines:  Adolescent Literature: Magazines Fanzines: Bop, Sixteen, Superteen, Teen Beat, Tiger Beat Fashion/advice: Seventeen, Teen, YM, CosmoGirl Sports: NBA Inside Stuff, SportsIllustrated (for Kids), Slam Action Sports: Warp, Transworld Skateboarding, BMX Plus, Thrasher Other sports-related: Beckett Baseball Card, WWF Magazine Music: Rolling Stone, Spin, Vibe, Right On, Circus, Word Up, The Source, Option, Fresh, Rap Pages, Nerve News: Teen People, Teen Newsweek Humor: Mad, Nickelodeon, Cracked Computers: GamePro, Electronic Gaming Monthly, Nnintendo Power, Game Players Literary: Merlyn’s Pen, Voices, Writes of Passage Science Fiction/Fantasy/Horror: Starlog, Analog, Wizard, Dragon, Hero Illustrated (comics), Fangoria Adolescent Literature: Magazines:  Adolescent Literature: Magazines Appeal to the short attention spans and busy schedules of many teens Socially acceptable reading material compared to books School libraries tend to focus on magazines reflecting the curriculum Magazines fill the mission of most public libraries– to provide materials for educational, recreational, cultural, and informational purposes “What is acceptable in San Francisco or New York might not fly in rural Tennessee or medium-sized burgs like Fort Wayne, Indiana.” Patrick Jones, p. 101, “Sex, Thugs, and Rock ‘n’ Roll: Magazines for Young Adults” in Young Adults and Public Libraries: a handbook of materials and services edited by C. Allen Nichols and Mary Anne Nichols Adolescent Literature: Newspapers:  Adolescent Literature: Newspapers Local: teens like to read about themselves and peers USA Today: photos, graphics, charts, graphs, chunks of information Horoscopes Comics Classified ads Online news: CNN, Fox, local television stations Adolescent Literature: Short Stories:  Adolescent Literature: Short Stories Possible to meet a greater variety of viewpoints and to represent different ethnic groups by reading several short stories instead of one novel “In an age when adults, especially teachers, love to remark on the short attention span of ‘Today’s Youth’ the short story seems to prefect antidote; a gripping literary experience in a nut shell. A nut shell, mind you not a pill. I think a whole generation or two of kids got turned off from short stories by the far griping pabulum served up to them in primers and made-for-instruction school anthologies. You know, those short stories that come with a list of questions hanging off the end. Those shorts would give anyone a wedgie!” Tim Wynne-Jones, 6th edition of textbook , page 364. Several anthologies of short stories written by known young adult authors have been published in the last few years, such as Leaving Home: 15 distinguished authors explore personal journeys, edited by Rochman and McCampbell and American Street: A multicultural anthology of stories edited by Anne Mazer At a session on “The Resurgence of the Short Story” at a NCTE Conventions, teacher Bob Seney from Houston, TX, recommended short story collections and showed how they represented various genres. Rush Hour: A Journal of Contemporary Voices edited by Michael Cart, compiles stories by writers and artists for older teens Short story selections originally published in Merlyn’s Pen: The National Magazines of Student Writing have been compiled in books published by The American Teen Writers series such as the following, and guides for teachers are usually available: Sophomore: Tales of Reality, Conflict, and the Road Freshmen: Fiction, Fantasy andHumor by Ninth Grade Writers Outsiders and Others: Stories of Outcasts, Rebels, and Seekers by American Teen Writers White Knuckles: Thrillers and Other Stories by American Teen Writers Taking Off: Coming of Age Stories by American Teen Writers Something Like a Hero: Stories of Daring and Decision by American Teen Writers Writing Tall: New Fables, Myths, and Tall Tales by American Teen Writers Adolescent Literature: Poetry:  Adolescent Literature: Poetry The Rose That Grew From Concrete by Tupac Shakur Girl Coming In For a Landing: a novel in poems by April Halprin Wayland I Feel a Little Jumpy Around You: paired poems by men & women by Naomi ShihabNye and Paul B. Janeczko Frenchtown Summer by Robert Cormier What Have You Lost? By Naomi Shihab Nye Behind the Wheel: Poems About Driving by Janet S. Wong Thing I Have To Tell You: poems and writings by teenage girls edited by Betsy Franco Make Lemonade by Virginia Euwer Wolff Brimstone Journals by Ron Koertge Heart to Heart: New Poems Inspired by Twentieth-Century American Art edited by Jan Greenberg Stop Pretending: What Happened When My Big Sister Went Crazy by Sonia Sones Spam-Ku: Tranquil Reflections on Luncheon Loaf by John Nagamichi Cho, Spam Haiku Archive Master Joyful Noise: Poems for Two Voices by Paul Fleischman Adolescent Literature: Classics, College, and Lifelong Readers:  Adolescent Literature: Classics, College, and Lifelong Readers Outstanding Books for the College Bound: choices for a new generation edited by Marjorie Lewis Genre-focused lists produced by YALSA since 1959; first produced at the request of the National Education Association (NEA) “Not a list of classics or bestsellers” Arranged by genre and the year of appearance on the list Genres include arts, biography, fiction, nonfiction, now/current, and poetry Titles that have appeared on the list ten times include Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen, The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Reading Lists for College-Bound Students by Doug Estell, Michele L. Satchwell,and Patricia S. Wright College and university lists List of one hundred titles recommended the most Top ten recommended authors Shakespeare Faulkner Dickens Hemingway Austen Homer Twain Sophocles Hawthorne Fitzgerald Adolescent Literature: Nonfiction:  Adolescent Literature: Nonfiction Recreational, informational, educational “Where Do All the Prizes Go?” by Milton Meltzer in 1966, indictment against the literary community, charging them with bias against nonfiction due to almost no recognition of nonfiction book awards People need visual stimulation, especially teenagers Nonfiction For young adults: from delight to wisdom by Carter and Abrahamson: accuracy, organization, style, format, uses Books for youth service workers and importance of staying familiar with resources Self-help Rosen Publishing Group, Inc. publishes books for reluctant readers/high interest and low reading levels; typically the books are heavily bound, include lots of photos, large print, and resources guides for further information “Coping With” series by Rosen including alcoholic parents, anxiety, asthma, birth control, compulsive eating, date rape, drugs and sports, eating disorders, foster children, PMS, gender bias, street gangs, etc. Drug Abuse Prevention Library focusing on different drugs Onslow Polishers produces similar series, such as I”issues in Focus” Adolescent Literature: Biographies and Autobiographies:  Adolescent Literature: Biographies and Autobiographies Teens, especially those who do not like to read fiction, may enjoy reading about the lives of other people Bad Boy: a memoir by Walter Dean Myers Hole In My Life by Jack Gantos Halle Berry: actor by James Robert Parish Literature and Author Resources:  Literature and Author Resources Print reference materials - The Power of Reading by Krashen - Life is Tough: guys, growing up, and young adult literature by Bilz - Reading Lists for College-Bound Students by Estell, Satchwell, and Wright - Best Books for High School Readers by Gillespie and Barr - Authors & Artists for Young Adults by Hayes -Great Books for High School Kids by Ayers and Crawford - A Core Collection for Young Adults by Jones, Taylor, and Edwards - ARBA In-Depth Children’s and Young Adult Titles by Dillon and Hysell Online databases - EBSCOHOST -Novelist -Lit Reference Center Recorded Books:  Recorded Books Selected Audiobooks Committee of YALSA First Part Last by Angela Johnson Distributors include Books on Tape, Inc., Brilliance Audio, Recorded Books, Listening Library Many public libraries have recently stopped buying cassettes Downloadable audiobooks Visually impaired teens Students with special needs benefit because they can read long, either silently or aloud, reinforcing reading skills Reluctant readers ESL Skillful narrative, variety of accents, help with pronunciation of difficult vocabulary words, foreign words, and unusual place and character names Audiobook awards and production “While it is sometimes not ‘cool’ for high school or junior high school students to read these days, it is frequently acceptable to listen to a portable cassette player. Who can tell whether a listener is listening to The Great Gatsby or rock music?”” (p. xviii of Kliatt Audiobook Guide) DVDs, Videos, and Web Streaming:  DVDs, Videos, and Web Streaming Selected DVDs and Videos Committee of YALSA - Winners must be under 60 minutes - Quality of photographs or images, sound, and appeal to teens - Most selections are focused on social issues - Scenarios USA - George Lucas in Love - The Truth About Violence (School Edition) Most public libraries stopped buying videos three years ago and some series, such as those by AIMS Multimedia that focus on social issues, are now available in DVD format Web streaming - Sample clips before purchasing DVDs - TV studio in Fort Wayne, Indiana and public service announcement for summer reading program Booktalking:  Booktalking A booktalk is . . . What you say to someone to convince someone to read a book A performance Not a book report or storytelling Outreach Process of “hooking” the potential reader Not something that you have to be creative to master! Try The Booktalker’s Bible by Langemark or More Booktalking That Works by Bromann Booktalking:  Booktalking Plot Summary Mood Scene Characters Booktalking:  Booktalking “YA 101: Inner Game of Booktalking” by Anderson and Mahood, Voice of Youth Advocates, June 2001, Vol. 24 No. 2, pp. 107-110 Program models - Based on a theme or topic - Logically connect to each other - Based on existing structure Booktalking :  Booktalking Accents/dialects: in the first person Atmosphere: Dim the lights when Blurbs: Use blurb on the back of the book Diary: Use authentic voice Experience: Relate story to your own personal experience Interview: Do the booktalk as an interview News story: Use the who, what, where, when, and how approach Props: Bring items related to the story Lists: If lists exist in the book, use them with the audience Mood: Change the setting of the space, if necessary, such as dimming the lights when talking about a mystery Reader’s theatre: Ask for volunteers to act out parts of the dialogue Involve the audience: Ask questions as a hook in the beginning of the booktalk Repetition: Repeat the same words over and over Sounds: Use sound effects to describe the book Connecting Young Adults and Libraries: a how-to-do-it manual by Patrick Jones Collaborating with Public Libraries:  Collaborating with Public Libraries Carol Murphy, Young Adult Librarian, West Deptford Public Library Textbooks Assignments Rotating artwork Fantasy stock market Publicity Programs and extra credit School visits Library tours Professional development Questions:  Questions Sheila B. Anderson [email protected] 302 359 1750 (cell) www.sheilabanderson.com

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Contexto Latinoamericano 2005
22. 10. 2007
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Contexto Latinoamericano 2005

BLRB08 2 rbs
11. 12. 2007
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BLRB08 2 rbs

CrystalPP
12. 10. 2007
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CrystalPP

07 Pilz
19. 10. 2007
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07 Pilz

Lec3 APS301 Slideshow
25. 10. 2007
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Lec3 APS301 Slideshow

Hill Ch 003 part 3 03
31. 10. 2007
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Hill Ch 003 part 3 03

Foolish Fragments
01. 11. 2007
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Foolish Fragments

pp hematoma
06. 11. 2007
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pp hematoma

file0068
06. 11. 2007
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file0068

Biodiesel Production
07. 11. 2007
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Biodiesel Production

turkey presentation
21. 11. 2007
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turkey presentation

Turkey and the EU
23. 11. 2007
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Turkey and the EU

chap14 07
14. 12. 2007
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chap14 07

The Clash of Civilizations
23. 12. 2007
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The Clash of Civilizations

grace agnew
20. 11. 2007
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grace agnew

IX Aerosol
03. 01. 2008
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IX Aerosol

Malignant Wounds
05. 01. 2008
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Malignant Wounds

224 121676
07. 01. 2008
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224 121676

Monday lab ppt presentation
10. 10. 2007
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Monday lab ppt presentation

Sailor Relationship Management
08. 10. 2007
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Sailor Relationship Management

Schischke Penang Label v2
01. 10. 2007
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Schischke Penang Label v2

tomography
15. 10. 2007
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tomography

Flowering2
17. 12. 2007
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Flowering2

INMET training course v4
28. 12. 2007
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INMET training course v4

landmarks And Monuments
12. 10. 2007
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landmarks And Monuments

EARSS december 1 06
19. 10. 2007
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EARSS december 1 06

Presen 1
10. 10. 2007
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Presen 1

P6S1
16. 02. 2008
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P6S1

mtgbog07 smith
19. 02. 2008
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mtgbog07 smith

Viktoras Seskauskas
28. 11. 2007
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Viktoras Seskauskas

Canadian literature powerpoint4
12. 03. 2008
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Canadian literature powerpoint4

ses3 1545 Sethu Raman
30. 09. 2007
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ses3 1545 Sethu Raman

A105 024 Cosmo
16. 10. 2007
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A105 024 Cosmo

communication 2
27. 11. 2007
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communication 2

Performance of DFT
31. 10. 2007
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Performance of DFT

investment strategy
09. 04. 2008
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investment strategy

Analyst meet
17. 04. 2008
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Analyst meet

Sess 1 Zhang Xizhen
10. 10. 2007
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Sess 1 Zhang Xizhen

2205 Joao Carlos
26. 11. 2007
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2205 Joao Carlos

Single Payer101
07. 05. 2008
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Single Payer101

dentalhealth
08. 05. 2008
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dentalhealth

AACBelecs2004
08. 05. 2008
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AACBelecs2004

Extending the SpanishWordNet
31. 10. 2007
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Extending the SpanishWordNet

SCOPE991001
02. 05. 2008
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SCOPE991001

SupportGroup031106
02. 05. 2008
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SupportGroup031106

Martina OConnor
02. 05. 2008
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Martina OConnor

dns pres michaelson roots
30. 10. 2007
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dns pres michaelson roots

m101
09. 10. 2007
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m101

CaseEUvirtuellefabrik
15. 10. 2007
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CaseEUvirtuellefabrik

hou leong
10. 10. 2007
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hou leong

DeSangroValencia
31. 10. 2007
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DeSangroValencia

Intro to Pod biomech
30. 04. 2008
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Intro to Pod biomech

wspa07 23
26. 03. 2008
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wspa07 23

95 Romi 25mag
19. 10. 2007
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95 Romi 25mag

Tue1530 137
09. 10. 2007
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Tue1530 137

Helping students help themselves
30. 10. 2007
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Helping students help themselves

XPath
18. 10. 2007
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XPath

GSB presentation4
29. 12. 2007
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GSB presentation4

tornado sample slides
02. 10. 2007
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tornado sample slides

vbq
09. 10. 2007
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vbq

sullivan list
08. 10. 2008
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sullivan list

Moore Plasma Circulation ESSE06
02. 11. 2007
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Moore Plasma Circulation ESSE06

biod145 lecture4 bb
16. 10. 2007
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biod145 lecture4 bb

Final Spring 2003 Presentation
06. 03. 2008
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Final Spring 2003 Presentation

Provisu SSIM2006
19. 10. 2007
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Provisu SSIM2006

30th Anniv USSP
17. 10. 2007
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30th Anniv USSP

Prion2005
15. 10. 2007
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Prion2005

imperialism 2
22. 10. 2007
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imperialism 2

Lipchitz AFDonCatRisk
23. 10. 2007
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Lipchitz AFDonCatRisk

Cumberland
26. 11. 2007
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Cumberland

606
16. 11. 2007
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606

GAIC5Oct04
31. 10. 2007
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GAIC5Oct04

eceatcz
20. 03. 2008
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eceatcz

upa nyc jonathan bloom
04. 10. 2007
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upa nyc jonathan bloom

ssuo robo3
15. 11. 2007
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ssuo robo3

nuccio lanza
15. 11. 2007
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nuccio lanza

Haroldo Sustainab Develop 0607
30. 10. 2007
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Haroldo Sustainab Develop 0607

presentation eichhorn jan
16. 11. 2007
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presentation eichhorn jan

ling411 23
19. 11. 2007
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ling411 23

DYB US PRC
16. 10. 2007
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DYB US PRC

PHN0202a
13. 03. 2008
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PHN0202a

10 2205 HISTORIA EUA
13. 11. 2007
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10 2205 HISTORIA EUA

ChineseAmericans
30. 10. 2007
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ChineseAmericans

apgrid ggf4
09. 10. 2007
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apgrid ggf4

kur
26. 10. 2007
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kur

HIS104 Lecture05
31. 10. 2007
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HIS104 Lecture05

Harvard Presentation
12. 10. 2007
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Harvard Presentation

wilhelmson
02. 10. 2007
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wilhelmson

MLI Site Visit 4 98 overview
29. 09. 2007
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MLI Site Visit 4 98 overview